1996

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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NEW THIS YEAR: Pony Express Relay Race

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 1996

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 14th, 15th, 16th, & 17th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Chrissi Loch, Stockton Graves, & Jerome Schneeberger
RODEO QUEEN: Amy Bull SPECIALTY ACT: One Armed Bandit

101 Wild West Rodeo Final Plans Shaping Up For Week-Long Show

 

The 101 The 101 Wild West Rodeo is getting bigger and better every year, and 1996 will be no different as the final plans begin to take shape for quite a show.

 

There will be rodeoing from Monday through Saturday at the 101 Ranch arena located at the southwest portion of West Prospect Avenue and North Ash Street, according to marketing director Darrell Dye.

 

"While the actual rodeo is set for Wednesday through Saturday, Aug. 14-17, with grand entry set for 8 p.m. each night, we do have a couple of special nights of activity in conjunction with the rodeo," Dye said.

 

He related that the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging event will kick off the week of activity at the arena at 8 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 12.

 

That event will involve cowboys participating in two full go-rounds, and a short go-round with prize money and a saddle going to the average winner. The top cowboys from the go-rounds will compete for $500 bonus money, Bill Pickett style, which means the cowboys have to bite the steer on the lip while throwing it to the ground, according to Dye.

 

All the shows and specialty acts of the rodeo set to be in the arena during the four nights, Aug. 14-17, with the Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan., once again supplying the stock and producing the show.

 

Prior to the Wednesday opening night activity however, will be a Tuesday night of steer roping and slack, beginning at 7 p.m. Rodeo officials say there will be two complete go-rounds of steer roping that night, Aug. 13, plus some slack.

 

Prior to the Saturday night performances Ponca City and area residents will line Grand Avenue for the annual 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, which has been set for 10 a.m.

Dye said there will be wild cow milking during the Wednesday and Thursday night performances of the rodeo, and the Red River Riders will perform on Friday and Saturday night, sponsored by 101 Beverage Company.

Rodeo fans will also be treated Wednesday through Saturday by the six-time PRCA Specialty Act of the Year, when Shidler's John Payne brings his One Armed Bandit act to the arena to thrill the crowds with one of the best performances fans will see.

 

Head Country Barbecue Restaurant will be hosting a barbecue dinner Thursday at the Moose Lodge in Ponca City, with proceeds going to Domestic Violence of Ponca City.

 

A rodeo dance has been set after the rodeo on Friday and Saturday nights, at Cassies Country just north of Ponca City on Hubbard Road.

 

During that week of rodeo, the 101 Rodeo Association urges all to dress western style throughout the week.

Rodeo Queen Competition Deadline Set

Deadline for entering the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen competition is July 29, according to Chairman Linda Mauk and Terri Buell.

 

The rodeo is Aug, 14, 15, 16 and 11, at the 101 Rodeo arena, North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue. Performances will be at 8 p.m. each night.

 

To qualify, queen contestants must sell $300 in rodeo admission tickets. Other qualifications will include being judged 40 percent horsemanship, 30 percent public speaking, 15 percent personality and 15 percent appearance. Age limit is between 14 and 24, and it is open to any resident of Oklahoma, but contestants can not be married or have never been married.

 

The public speaking competition will include a three minute speech on their choice of topic including: their home town, about the sport of rodeo, or the history of the 101 Ranch.

 

Each contestant will be interviewed privately by the judges. A style show will also be held at the same time as the speeches. The public is invited to attend.

 

Numerous Ponca City merchants have donated awards and gifts for the queen, horsemanship, congeniality and runner-up.

 

For information, call Mauk at 765-8864 day or 762-0406 evening, or Buell at 765-2980.

Parade Marshals Chosen For 101 Wild West Rodeo

 

Three young but talented rodeo performers have been selected as Parade Marshals for the 1996 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, according to Chris Short, of the rodeo foundation.

 

The parade will be at 10 a.m. Aug. 17, includes a couple other activities prior to the parade to kick off the festivities that end with the fourth night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena.

 

Those special activities are the pancake breakfast at the Masonic Lodge on West Grand Avenue beginning at 7 a.m. It's all-you-can-eat for $3.50

 

The other activity will be at Centennial Plaza at 8:30 a.m. Aug. 17, when Oklahoma Kids will be performing.

 

Short said that there are two requirements this year for rodeo parade participants, one of which is the parking of trailers and vehicles in the area of assemble, and that everyone with a horse in the parade must be prepared to show a Coggins Certificate for the horse.

 

"The assembly area is at the Ponca City Middle School, but there is not any room west of the school now for people to park their trailers and vehicles. It has been taken up by the construction of a new school, and police have said that there is ample parking along the side streets, but vehicles must be parked legally," Short said.

 

Parade Marshals this year include Chrissi Loch, who took eighth nationally in the goat-tying contest; Stockton Graves, who qualified for the national high school finals in bulldogging and calf-roping; and Jerome Schneeberger, the national finals collegiate champion in calf-roping. Schneeberger also set the arena record at Dodge City two weeks ago in the calf-roping event.

 

Short said the parade route would head east from Elm Street on Grand Avenue, to Sixth Street. Anyone wishing to participate should contact Short at 762-9649.


"There's no charge to get into the parade, but there is a lineup that needs to be followed, so people should call if they want to be in the parade," Short said.

Barbecue Thursday Night Benefits Domestic Violence

A 101 Wild West Rodeo tradition has been restored to the rodeo's Thursday night performance, but with a pleasing new twist. Rodeo fans attending the Aug. 15 performance will enjoy the traditional pre-rodeo barbecue dinner absolutely free.

 

"United Supermarket and Head Country Bar-B-Q Restaurant have come together to support the Domestic Violence Program of North Central Oklahoma Inc., and the 101 Wild West Rodeo," explains Brad Beaty, Ponca City Rodeo Foundation president. "We both are extremely appreciative of their support." Beaty said the rodeo barbecue is free to anyone with an advance ticket for Thursday evening's performance. "It is important to stress that the Aug. 15 barbecue is for Thursday evening advance ticket holders," he said.

 

The barbecue dinner will be held Aug. 15 at the Moose Lodge, Ash and Prospect. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. The rodeo performance will follow at 8 p.m. at the rodeo grounds across the street west.


RED RIVER RIDERS of Clarksville, Texas, will appear twice at the 101 Wild West Rodeo, compliments of 101 Beverage of Ponca City. They will perform during the Friday and Saturday night rodeo at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena and have designed a drill that displays precision at all gaits — from walk to wide open speed. Popular maneuvers include figure eights,. wagonwheel, and the wave, but the most outstanding part of the drill is the "mix master."

Bandit's Company Keeps Show Going

Lynn Payne, a 20-year-old cowboy from Shidler, is the youngest member of "The One Arm Bandit and Company" specialty act that will be appearing at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Aug. 14-17.

 

Also helping out will be Amanda Payne, 18, who also is the daughter of John Payne, The One Arm Bandit.

 

Recently the Bandit was in California, Lynn was in Utah, Terry Smith who works for them was in Atlanta at the Olympics and all three were doing shows. So Amanda did the Pawhuska Cavalcade by herself.

 

Lynn and his father John started the show in 1987. Lynn assisted John with the training of all the animals, and the building of the first horse trailer used in the show.

 

Currently Payne has four "rigs" on the road. The Paynes will be bringing two of the rigs into the arenas at the 101 Ranch Rodeo for a two ring show at the same time on Wednesday and Thursday night.

 

John says, "We're going to give them everything we've got because this is where we got started.

 

The Paynes have won "Specialty Act of the Year" the past seven years. This award is voted on by the PRCA.

 

Along with helping his father during the show, Lynn has been an integral part of the partnership. He did his first solo performance in 1994, in Rockford, Ill., during his senior year in high school.

 

Lynn rides a six-year-old mustang (Tucker), which he raised and trained himself. With the completion of high school he went on to do a total of 50 performances. His performances increased to 81 in 1995 and he is scheduled to do more than 100 in 1996. His travels have taken him from coast to coast and to Canada He enjoys traveling and meeting people, but is always glad to be home in Shidler.

 

When he is not performing he works at home on the ranch raising longhorn cattle, horses and cur dogs. He enjoys riding horses hunting and tinkering with old pickups.

Reigning 101 Queen Competed In State

The 1995 Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen, Tara Banks, has traveled throughout Oklahoma this year competing in numerous pageants.

 

The 17-year-old daughter of Richard and Gaye Banks, and great-granddaughter of Everette and Elizabeth Rochelle of Ponca City, Tara just recently took first runner-up and horsemanship at Owasso and also represented Colcord as their queen.

 

She is now serving as the National Vice-President in the Vocational Industrial Clubs of America.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation acknowledges a number of individuals and business firms that have made the queen candidate contest possible.

 

Trout Funeral, Steve and Terry Huston have provided the Queen's saddle; Jimmy's Western Wear, the Queen's buckle and McVay's, the Queen's watch.

West End Interiors has provided the first runner-up buckle; Sonic Drive-In, the horsemanship buckle; Cornerstone Restaurant, ticket sales buckle; Creative Flowers and Linda Culver, contestants' flowers.

 

Sam and Robin Smith will provide stables for the contestants' horses; Blue Moon and Head Country Bar-B-Q, dining accommodations; and Rose Stone Inn, hotel accommodations.

 

The queen's committee has included Linda Mauk, Robin Carpenter and Stacey Jackson.

101 WILD WEST RODEO SET FOR 37TH YEAR

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making it's fourth four-night run in Ponca City, after many years of three-night performances as the 101 Ranch Rodeo.

 

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be Aug. 14-17. with performances nightly set for 8 p.m.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue, and not at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect.

 

1996 will mark the 37th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

 

Fabulous History

The fabulous 101 Ranch with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

 

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa, and Osage tribes.

 

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61. and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

 

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment incentive for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix s debut as a roper and rider.

 

Success Crumbles
After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the death of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

 

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes  were constructed in 1962.

 

The 1996 rodeo will attempt to bring "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma,, Colorado, and Kansas.

 

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, and the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Brad Beaty contracted with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the four-night stand.

 

 Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena chutes, where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes.

 

Many special events happen during "rodeo week." They include an exciting parade, the excitement of 101 Wild West Rodeo, Queen contestant activities, special nights for barbecue and dances. and the playing by the Po-Hi band as the official 101 Wild West Rodeo Cowboy Band, under the direction of Steve Workman.

 

Rumford Rodeo Contractors
Contestants will be thoroughly tested for their skills in bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding, bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, steer roping and calf roping, when they do it against the stock of the Rumford Rodeo Company. For the past few years, Rumford Rodeo Company has been the stock contractor and producer of the rodeo.

 

Led by Floyd and Lola Rumford from Abbyville, Kan., the Rumford Rodeo Company got it's big lift when Floyd received his PRCA card in 1984 and for the last ten years has produced or subcontracted for rodeos across 17 different states.

 

Son Bronc Rumford is manager and co-owner of all the ranch  operation and rodeo business. Bronc is also in great demand as arena director and pickup man.

 

Tommy Rumford, also a PRCA contestant and co-owner of the family business, works as a pickup man and in all phases of the horse business. This includes a horse and mule auction in Hutchinson. Kan., which the Rumford's have managed for more than 10 years.

 

Busy Week For Rodeoers


Monday
Second Annual Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging. 8 p.m..
101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.


Tuesday
Steer Roping, 2 Full Go Rounds, 7 p.m.; followed by Rodeo Slack.
101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.


Wednesday
101 Wild West Rodeo, 8 p.m., 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue. Family Night, Wild Cow Milking, Specialty Act One Armed Bandit John Payne of Shidler.


Thursday
Head Country Bar-B-Q Restaurant dinner, 6 p.m.. Moose Lodge (across the street east of rodeo grounds), proceeds to Domestic Violence Program. 101 Wild West Rodeo, 8 p.m., 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue. Family Night. Wild Cow Milking. Specialty Act One Armed Bandit John Payne of Shidler.


Friday
101 Wild West Rodeo, 8 p.m., 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena. North Ash Street and Prospect Avenue. Specialty Acts One Armed Bandit John Payne of Shidler, and Red River Riders of Clarksville. Texas. Rodeo Dance, follows the rodeo, Cassie's Country, Hubbard Road.


Saturday
Pancake and Sausage Breakfast. 6:30 a.m.- 1 p.m.. Ponca Masonic Lodge, 1200 West Grand. Oklahoma Kids, 8:30 a.m.. Centennial Plaza, downtown Ponca City. Rodeo Parade, 10 a.m., starts on West Grand Avenue at Elm, heads east to Sixth Street through downtown Ponca City. 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Coronation, 7:30 p.m., 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena. 101 Wild West Rodeo, 8 p.m., 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, North Ash Street and Prospect, Specialty Acts One Armed Bandit John Payne of Shidler and Red River Riders of Clarksville. Texas. Rodeo Dance, follows the rodeo, Cassie's Country, Hubbard Road.


Parade Saturday Features Three Young Marshals

Three young but talented rodeo performers have been selected as Parade Marshals for the 1996 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, according to Chris Short, of the rodeo foundation.

 

The parade will be at 10 a.m. Aug. 17, includes a couple other activities prior to the parade to kick off the festivities that end with the fourth night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena.

 

Those special activities are the pancake breakfast at the Masonic Lodge on West Grand Avenue beginning at 7 a.m. It's all-you-can-eat for $3.50

 

The other activity will be at Centennial Plaza at 8:30 a.m. Aug. 17, when Oklahoma Kids will be performing.

 

Short said that there are two requirements this year for rodeo parade participants, one of which is the parking of trailers and vehicles in the area of assemble, and that everyone with a horse in the parade must be prepared to show a Coggins Certificate for the horse.

"The assembly area is at the Ponca City Middle School, but there is not any room west of the school now for people to park their trailers and vehicles. It has been taken up by the construction of a new school, and police have said that there is ample parking along the side streets, but vehicles must be parked legally." Short said.

 

Parade Marshals this year include Chrissi Loch, who took eighth nationally in the goat-tying contest; Stockton Graves, who qualified for the national high school finals in bulldogging and calf-roping; and Jerome Schneeberger, the national finals collegiate champion in calf-roping. Schneeberger also set the arena record at Dodge City two weeks ago in the calf-roping event.

 

Short said the parade route would head east from Elm Street on Grand Avenue, to Sixth Street. Anyone wishing to participate should contact Short at 762-9649. "There's no charge to get into the parade, but there is a lineup that needs to be followed, so people should call if they want to be in the parade," Short said.

 

Bill Pickett Bulldogging


Rodeo week begins in earnest Monday with the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging event at 8 p.m. in the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena.

 

There will be two full go rounds, and a short go round with prize money and a saddle going to the average winner.

 

The top cowboys from the go rounds will also compete for bonus money of $500 during a competition of Bill Pickett-style bulldogging, meaning the cowboys have to bite the steer on the lip while throwing him to the ground.

Young Performers Sing At 101 Rodeo

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will have special musicians singing the National Anthem at the beginning of each performance this year during the four nights of the rodeo performance.

 

Singing on Wednesday will be Kimberly Evans, 10 year old daughter of Bruce and Deb Evans, and Blair Turney, 8-year-old daughter of Phil and Darla Turney.

 

Evans is a fifth grader at Trout School and has sung at Carnegie Hall. New York City, had a principle part four years in the Conoco Christmas plays, participated in three plays of Ponca Playhouse and sang with Mayor Marilyn Andrews during the ceremonies at Westminster Village for the Oklahoma City bombing memorial.

 

She has been a student for seven years with the Inciardi School of Dance, two years as a Ponca City News paper carrier, and participated in the Cancer Relay for Life.

 

Turney is a third grader at First Lutheran School and has been a member of Oklahoma Kids for five year, reaching the state finals competition each year, and placed first three of the five years in vocal and dance competition.

 

She has competed in the Junior Music Festival three years and holds several pageant titles, including "Little Miss Oklahoma Talent Queen," "All Star Oklahoma Beauty Queen," and is the alternate for "Little Miss Kaw Lake." She represented Oklahoma twice m Hollywood at the "Little Miss of America" pageant, reaching the top ten one year and second runner-up the other.

 

Currently under contract with Fullerton Modeling Agency, Turney has appeared in one movie and several commercials and has trained with Bill and Suzanne Kern for six years in dance and gymnastics and with Leslie Rardin four years in vocal arts.

AUDREY EUBANK, 10-year-old daughter of David and Sharon Eubank, will be singing the National Anthem for the 101 Wild West Rodeo Thursday. The fifth grader at Washington Elementary has been in the 1996 Junior Music Theater and second runner-up in the Junior Vocal Art Song Division.

 

PAMELA HILL, 16-year-old daughter of Susan and Tom Tudor, is a student of Ponca City High School and will be singing the National Anthem at the 101 Wild West Rodeo Fri-day. Hill is a member of FFA and the FFA horse judging team. She is a three-year member of American Kids, where she was a state finalist. She sang at the Oklahoma State Fair, and has been a finalist at the State Fair Talent Spotlight.

 

 

 

AMBER MARIE KEESEE, 16-year-old daughter of Elizabeth and Butch Behar, will be the featured performer at the 101 Wild West Rodeo Saturday when she sings the National Anthem. Amber has been in Oklahoma Kids two years, a state finalist and performer at the State Fair.

 

'Dogger' Smiling After Pickett Win

 

If anyone wants to tell you that Checotah is the "bulldogging capital of the state," don't refute it.

 

No less than a dozen cowboys showed up Monday night for the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging event, and one of them, Dusty Duvall, carried the special prizes home.

Competition was really keen in the event that served as the kick-off to rodeo week, which ends with a four-night performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, Wednesday through Saturday.

 

Tonight the Rumford Rodeo Company, rodeo producers, will stage slack for the extra high numbers of competitors that have entered the open listing. Action is scheduled to begin at 7 p.m., and include two go-rounds of steer roping, team roping, steer wrestling (bulldogging), and calf roping.

 

The four nights of main rodeo will begin at 8 p.m. Wednesday, and include specialty acts along with all other usual events of the rodeo: bull riding, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, calf roping, girls barrel racing, steer wrestling and team roping. There will also be specialty acts, including One Armed Bandit all four nights and Red River Riders on Friday and Saturday.

 

When it was all over for Monday night's performances in the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging, Dusty Duvall, was one happy fellow Duvall had finished sixth in the first go, and fourth in the third go, and took fifth in the average. That set him up for a try in the $500 added bonus, and special saddle trophy by bulldogging a steer "Bill Pickett style." He did just that in the best time, and ended the night with some real extras to go with his prize money in the go-rounds and average.

 

Shane Henderson of Winfield was the average winner, using a 4.37 in the first go for third place, 4.65 for fifth in the second go and finished the third go with a 5.65.

 

Taking second in the average was Josh Mclntyre of Goodwell, followed by Warren Jackson, Houston: Garrett Nokes of Nebraska; Dusty Duvall and Jody Stampler, Beggs, sixth.

 

Tom Duvall was the first go winner in 3.93, the best time of the night Robin Peterson of Checotah was second, followed by Henderson, Shawn Johnson of Checotah, Nokes and Dusty Duvall.

 

The second go winner was Rex Meyer of Checotah in 4.13, followed by Jackson, Joe Morris of Elgin, Texas, Mclntyre; Henderson and Tom Duvall.

 

The third go winner, Stamper, had a 4.10. He was followed by Mclntyre, Nokes. Dusty Duvall, Morris and Casey Callahan of Cameron, Texas.

Nightlong Slack Produces Fast Times To Open Rodeo

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo opens with a four- night running at 8 p.m. tonight in the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena at North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

 

But anyone who could stick it out, was able to see some really good times in the slack portion of the rodeo Tuesday night, if they were able to with stand the 10 hours that it took to run off.

 

The unlimited numbers of slack performers is made possible with the Rumford Rodeo Company furnishing stock for the rodeo and cowboys taking advantage of it.

 

Starting at 7 p.m., rodeo lovers were treated to some really top times in all of the events. Take for instance, the 11.1 by Doug dark of Wayne, Okla., in the steer roping that won him the first go-round of 47 entries. But Buster Record Jr. of Buffalo and Roy Cooper of Childress, Texas, each had a 10.4 in the second go-round.

 

They were unable to match however, the consistency of Rod Hartness, a Pawhuska roper, when he turned in 12.5 and 12.3 to wrap up the steer roping title with a 24.8 total.

 

There was excitement also in the girls barrel racing. First up was Kay Young of Overbrook, Okla., and she toured the arena course in 16.8. That was really fast, but she had to survive sever- al others that were within a second of that time, including Leanna Hall of Jay, 17.1; Charla Alien of Pawhuska, 17.3; Melissa Bunyard of Douglass, Kan., 17.5; and Sandy Hobaugh, Braman, 17.6.

 

Team ropers completed part of the first go-round. They'll all be back during the rest of the four-night rodeo, but have to really do well to better the 6.6 of Morris McWhorter, Telephone, Texas and his heeler Ray Boogie, Rockwall, Texas.

 

One complete go-round of steer wrestling was held, and there were some times turned in that were similar to those of the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging event of Monday.

 

There were 76 entries in the steer wrestling and each one of them had one shot at the first go-round. It was won by Shane Henderson of Win-field with a 3.6, who used a 5.4 with that to get a 9.0 mark for two go-rounds — something for all of the others to shoot at when they get the opportunity in the next four nights.

 

Best of the calf ropers so far is an 8.5 by Shawn Franklin of House, N.M., in the first go-round. There were 71 entries and all roped or chased their calves during the first go-round Tuesday. Most will be back, but they'll have to shoot at some nifty roping and tying done by Maury Tate, Apache, Okla., who had 9.8 and 9.2 for a combined 19.0.

 

The rodeo really picks up with specialty acts and saddle bronc riding, bull riding, bareback riding, and action in the other events other than steer roping which was completed Tuesday.

High Marks, Quick Times Targets For 101 Rodeoers

 

Participants in the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the next three nights will have some high marks and quick times to shoot for after the first night of action Wednesday.

 

Take for instance that 83 that Payne L. Dobler of Andover, Kan., scored on a tough, bareback bronc Copen Nightmare. Throw in the 76 that saddle bronc rider Matt Reed of El Dorado, Kan., had on a Rumford Rodeo Company steed, Fort Hays.

 

But if anyone left early Wednesday night, they missed quite a ride on Whirley Bird. a twisting, turning bull that Raymond A. Wessel of Cedar Point, Kan., rode to the score of a 78 in the bull riding event.

 

The rodeo continues tonight through Saturday, with performances beginning at 8 p.m. each night. Saturday, the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen coronation will be held at 7:30 p.m. in the arena prior to the regular performance. Four contestants are vying for this year's saddle and other trophies, along with representing Ponca City (101 Wild West Rodeo) throughout the state in promoting the rodeo through the year.

 

Tonight is family night again at the rodeo. Head Country Bar-B-Q Restaurant and United Super-market are hosting a barbecue dinner at the Moose Lodge, with proceeds going to the Domestic Violence program. It starts at 6 p.m. and is for advanced ticket holders of the Thursday performance.

 

Wednesday was a continuance of the timed events of Tuesday's 10-hour slack performance, with some terrific times turned in. There were two girl barrel racers breaking the 17-second barrier. with Sharon Smith of Dibble, Okla., turning the cloverleaf pattern in 16.93 and right behind at 16.99 was Phyllis Wells of Harrah. But that couldn't catch first place so far, held by Kay Young of Overbrook in 16.8.

 

In the team roping, a Kansas pair of Jeff Switzer and Jason Trent turned the trick in 8.2 for the Wednesday crowd. That was off the pace of 6.6 turned in by Morris McWhorter of Telephone, Texas, and Boogie Ray of Rockwall, Texas, during the slack performances. However all team ropers have two go-rounds, and all still have to put a sec-ond effort into the books in order to claim the title. The teams do, however, get first and second go-round top money individually. The nine teams competing Wednesday were in their first go, and are expected back in the arena tonight for the second go. So, McWhorter and Ray took the first go in 6.6, since there are no other teams awaiting that first go competition.

 

Next best for the team ropers are two teams at 7.2 including Kyle Elwood of Salina, Kan., and Barry Wood of lnman, Kan., and the team of Chad Hiatt, Canyon, Texas and Shannon Frascht, Burlington, Okla. The team of George Bunyard, Douglass, Kan., and Randy Hamilton, Derby, Kan., have a 7.7. Anything can happen in the event that has a header having to rope a steer, turn it for the heeler to rope the two hind legs. Any slip-up is costly, including breaking the barrier out of the chute, or getting just one leg.

 

The second go-round awaits steer wrestlers, who are shooting at Shane Henderson of Winfield, Kan., who has a 9.0 after the two go-rounds in slack Tuesday. Henderson had a 3.6 in the first go that was the best of the event. Currently, the best second go time is 4.0 by Ricky Huddleston of McAlester. There are numerous cowboys that have a shot at the 9.0 by Henderson.

 

Best on Wednesday in the steer wrestling was a 4.6 by Joe Morris of Elgin, Texas. With his 5.1 on Tuesday, that gives him 9.7. Casey Callahan of Cameron, Texas, with a 7.0 was the only other steer wrestler under double digits. All the others had to take higher times after leaving the chute too early, and were "caught speeding," as Dr. Lynn Phillips, rodeo announcer, would say.

 

Best Wednesday performance in calf roping was 9.0 turned in by Grady Lockhart of Oral, S.D. That's not the best in the second go, which is being held during the final four nights of the rodeo after all participated at least in a first go on Tuesday (maybe early Wednesday morning). Best in the second go ,go far was at that time, when Lynndel Walters of Collinsville made the tie in 8.6. However Roy Cooper's two efforts of 9.8 and 9.2 for a combined 19.0 will be awfully tough to beat. Cooper is from Childress, Texas.

 

Chasing Dobler's 83 in the bareback riding event is Steve Abernathy of Broken Arrow with a 74 and Eric Mouton of Weatherford with a 73.

 

In the saddle bronc riding, Reed's 76 is currently followed by Sam Kiefer of LeRoy, Kan., with a 73; Todd Eberle, Burwell, Neb., 72; and Otey McCloy,  Goodwell, with a 71.

Wessel's 78 in the bull riding is followed by Todd Callahan of Benton, Ark., with a 74; Adriano Morales of Keller, Texas, with 71; and Blake Spann, Plainview. Texas, with 70.

Rodeo Excitement Builds As Performances Improve

 

The excitement of a full week of rodeoing that began building Monday has turned the 101 Wild West Rodeo into a frenzy for almost everybody getting to the arena.

 

And indications from Thursday night are that no time nor score is safe from the efforts of contestants, and animals alike!

 

While the Bill Pickett Memorial Bulldogging times established on Monday are safe and the prize money and trophies are already tucked away — nothing is safe from the way things are shaping up in the rest of the week.

 

Tonight and Saturday, at 8 p.m., contestants will still be trying to rewrite the Rumford Rodeo Company secretary's book and get into the payoffs. There's a good chance they will be able to do just that, but it will take some supreme efforts on the part of the contestants and all animals involved in each event.

 

And while the prize money remains undecided, there's at least a couple of things that just have been outstanding.

 

Take for instance, The One Armed Bandit, John Payne of Shidler, and son Lynn and daughter Amanda, continue to do something different each night and the crowd has really been enthusiastic about it.

 

And then, there's the bullfighters and clowns in the arena, as they have been quite welcome — in particular at the right time when one such bull rider hit the arena floor quite hard Thursday night. The bullfighters Kevin Rich and Mike Johnson, and clown Rick Young, have really done their job.

 

Putting it all together, the 101 Ranch Rodeo Foundation and Posse, under the directions of presidents Brad Beaty and Sandy Dickey, also have simply been outstanding. The foundation once again decided that the Rumford Rodeo Company should produce the rodeo, and there certainly has been nothing wrong with that.

 

But the really neat thing is to have the contestants show up, and that may be because of all the good times and scores that are being put on the secretary's books. The open entry list for timed events found 10 hours of slack performances on Tuesday night, ending around 5 a.m. Wednesday and then on opening night, there were many of the same performers and workers ready to do it all over.

 

When Wednesday was done, there were some really good times and scores on the books and three more nights of competition waiting to be held. Thursday night shoved some of those prize money hopefuls off the list, and also out of first place in some instances.

 

But two scores remained in the rough stock competition. including an 83 by Payne L. Dobler of Andover, Kan., in bareback bronc riding with- standing the pressure. However, Shawn Frey of Mariow, Okla., jumped into second place with a 78 on Willy Cat Thursday night.

 

The saddle bronc riding score of 76 by Matt Reed of El Dorado also was challenged, but Paul Peterson of Texhoma, Okla., got a 75 to go into second place.

 

Near the end of the Thursday night performance with a large family night crowd cheering, two bull riders scored in the 80s and that knocked the 78 of Raymond Wessel of Cedar Point, Kan., down a couple of notches.

 

The bull riders had to with-stand the sight of one of their cohorts, Matt Blevins, Roanoke, Texas escorted from the arena floor by medical technicians. Blevins was not a happy rider for White Night and was tossed hard to the arena floor, knocking a shoulder out of place. He was attended to, and left after the rodeo was over, with his shoulder in a sling and encouragement that he probably could be back to riding soon.

 

Shortly after Blevins had his ride cut short, Royd Doyal of Pittsburg, Texas, got an 81 on Bad Jose, and Gary Robinson, Greenville, Texas, finished the night as the final rider, with an 80. Those two moved ahead of Wessel.

 

Girls barrel racers utilized the noise of the crowd to put on a show also, with one of the cur-rent national top 15 prize money leaders Deborah Mohon of Gladewater, Texas, riding into second place with a 16.87. Kay Young of Overbrook, Okla., remained in the top spot with a 16.8 on Tuesday night during the slack, while Mohon moved ahead of two who bettered the 17 second marks on Wednesday: Sharon Smith of Dibble, Okla., 16.93 and Phyllis Wells, Harrah, 16.99.

 

Team ropers Bret Boatright of Mulhall and Joe Day of Howe, Texas, showed how to do it in 5.8 seconds. That could go a long way toward second go winnings, since the best during the first go was almost a full second slower, at 6.6 by Morris McWhorter, Telephone, Texas, and Boogie Ray, Rockwall, Texas. The only other team to do the trick right Thursday night was Shawn and Mike Johnson of Checotah in 8.1, but they had a "no time" the first go.

 

The steer wrestling event saw a major shakeup when Phillip Ryan Clifton of Oklahoma City slipped in with a 3.7 to go with a 4.8 earlier and is now holding first place with a combined 8.5. Joel Edmondson of Eureka showed his championship form of years ago, when he got a 4.0 to go with a 4.8 and now has 8.5 for second just behind Clifton. The pair took Winfield's Shane Hen-derson out of the top spot, who had a 9.0 during slack on two.

 

The 19.0 owned by Roy Cooper of Childress, Texas, in calf roping looks pretty tough. He got it during the Tuesday night early Wednesday morning slack on 9.8 and 9.2 efforts. Best on Thursday was a pair of 9.8s with Tommy Eaton, Ada and Roger Branch of Cushing turning them in. However, neither were able to match them with less than double digit seconds on their first go, with Eaton having an 11.6 for a 21.4 total and Branch posting a 15.0 for a 24.8 total.

 

Tonight and Saturday, besides the One Armed Bandit specialty act, the crowd will get to see the Red River Riders, a precision group on horseback.

 

Also on Saturday, at 7:30 p.m., the coronation of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen will be held.

Rodeo Riders Score Well Despite Mud

 

A heavy downpour early Friday evening cut the numbers of the 101 Wild West Rodeo crowd, but not the enthusiasm of participants as the main performance went on as scheduled.

 

With the arena floor showing six inches or so of heavy mud and large water puddles, some almost big enough to swim in, there was considerable slipping and sliding. But the rain had finished and the show went on.

 

Steer wrestlers paid no heed to the conditions, and rolled the steers over on their backs, getting quite muddy in doing so and calf ropers were able to make the catches and ties — on occasion.

 

The bareback and saddle bronc riding cowboys had very little trouble getting their steeds to perform once out of the chute, but an occasional bull would plant all four feet in the mud and settle — maybe for a split second or so.

 

What appeared to be only a couple hundred spectators shortly before the 8 p.m. start, turned out to be much more than that. Chute Heaven was pretty well filled, and both east and west grandstands had several hundred spectators in them.

 

The Red River Riders were unable to get into the arena for their show, and John Payne, the One Armed Bandit, waited until the competition was over before attempting to get his rigs into the arena for his spectacular show.

 

The girl barrel racers realized a tough, slow ride around the barrels, with none of them able to get under the 18-second figure. Best of the night was an 18.03 turned by Tracy Johnson, Ardmore, and 18.40 by Marsha Mays, of Pawhuska. Thus, the leader, Kay Young of Overbrook only had to await Saturday's performers prior to taking the title with a 16.8 on Tuesday. Deborah Mohon of Gladewater, Texas, had a 16.87 on Thursday and two Wednesday performers, Sharon Smith of Dibble, Okla., and Phyllis Wells of Harrah had 16.93 and 16.99 respectively.

 

Despite all the mud and water, Ponca City's young Jerome Schneeberger as the header and Lee Davis doing the heeling, turned in a 7.3 in team roping competition Friday night. They had no time on their first effort, but were in second place of the second go, behind that 5.8 turned in by Bret Boatright of Mulhall and Joe Day, Howe, Texas, on Thursday to go with a 21.7 on Wednesday for a two-go of 27.5.

 

That 27.5 wasn't best however, as Jim Davis of Abilene, Texas paired up with Ponca City's J. Paul Williams to post a 12.4 on Tuesday and a 12.5 Friday for a two-go of 24.9.

Best first go is by Morris McWhorter of Telephone, Texas and his partner. Boogie Ray of Rockwall, Texas, with 6.6. They were unable to do the trick on Friday however and took no time.

 

Steer wrestlers got the muddiest however, as almost always happens, when they leap from their horse and grab the steer, take to the ground on their back and try to turn that steer over. Jimmy Henson of Bixby did it best in 4.7. followed by Stewart Gulager, Tahlequah with 5.0 and Sage Oakley of Chelsea in 5.8. Gulager's effort goes with a 4.8 during slack for a 9.8. Henson now has a 10.6 with his 4.7 and 5.9 in slack. Oakley had a no time in slack.

 

Phillip Ryan Clifton of Oklahoma City had the best two-go to Saturday, with 4.8 and 3.7 for an 8.5 in the steer wrestling.

 

Calf roping was almost treacherous, but a couple got caught speeding and had to settle for 10-second penalties. It was costly, as Vance Gulager of Tahlequah had a 9.5, plus 10 and Ty Vaughn Phillips of Ringling had 9.3 plus 10. Best without the penalty were Kelly Banks of Bartlesville with 14.8 and Billy Hamilton of Kiowa with 15.8.

 

Roy Cooper of Childress, Texas, has the best for the in two-go with his 9.8 and 9.2 for 19.0. The times had been credited to Maury Tate of Apache earlier, but that was misreading of the result books. Next is a 19.1 by Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas, with 9.1 and 10.0.

 

In the opening event Friday, bareback riders got the night off to a thrilling start, when Shawn Frey. Marlow, Okla., got an 81. Put that with his 78 of Thursday and he'll be tough to beat. Others on Friday to score well and get good two time efforts were D.J. John-son of Hutchinson with a 76 to go with a 69, and Jody Wiggins of Fort Scott, Kan., 74 to go with a 65. Best up for Saturday's performance with Wednesday scores, were Payne Dobler, Andover, Kan., 83; Steve Abernathy, Broken Arrow, 74: and Eric Mouton, Weatherford, 73.

 

In saddle bronc riding, there were three 68s, by Bart McBeth of Douglass, J.T. Hitch of Stilesvile, Ind., and Wes Bailey, of Hamilton, Kan. Bailey is the only one with two scores to get into the total, having a 72 on Thursday. Best on Wednesday and riding Saturday were Matt Reed, El Dorado, 76; Sam Kiefer. LeRoy, Kan., 73; Billy Dimmitt, Burwell, Neb., 72; and Otey McCoy, Goodwell, 71.

 

Best bull ride Friday was a 76 on Bad Jose by Blu B. Bryant, Nacadoches, Texas. But that's third to Royd Doyal, Pittsburg, Texas, 81 and Gary Robinson, Greenville, Texas, 80 on Thursday night.

Big Crowd Enjoys Finale Of 101 Wild West Rodeo

 

One of the largest crowds in recent history witnessed the final night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo here Saturday. From indications of the crowd responses, they were pleased with the efforts of all who had anything to do with putting on the show.

 

Those efforts come from the volunteer help of the Rodeo Foundation, and Rodeo Posse, to the hired help in the stock pens holding the Rumford Rodeo Company stock, to the "no time" and "no score" participants and the "money winners."

 

There were so many highlights, from the opening presentations, to the clown acts in between contested events, to the barrel racing of two of the youngest riders in the arena, to the precision riding of the Red River Riders, and the finale act of the One Armed Bandit, John Payne.

 

Team ropers provided what turned out to be the biggest jump into money winnings when two advanced over what had been the best up to Saturday.

 

Chad Hiatt of Canyon, Texas, and Shannon Franscht of Burlington, Okla., put an 8.0 on the record book Saturday to go with an earlier 7.2 and claimed the title with a snappy 15.2 for $749.27 each.

 

And Marshall Samples of Abilene, Kan., and Toby Mentzer of Ensign, Kan., had a 10.3 to go with a 14.6 that gave them 24.9. That tied previous leaders Jim Davis of Abilene, Texas, and J. Paul Williams of Ponca City, who had 12.4 and 12.5 for their 24.9. As a result the four got $468.29 each.

 

Hiatt and Franscht had used the 7.2 in the first go for a second place tie to nab $468.29 each and the 8.0 was third best in the second go, for $374.63 each.

 

Best first go was the 6.6 by Morris McWhorter of Telephone, Texas, and Boogie Ray, Rockwall, Texas, for $749.27 each while Kyle Elwood of Salina, Kan., and Barry Wood of lnman, Kan. had a 7.2 to get $468.29 apiece also, as did Hiatt and Franscht. In the second go, best of the entire event came on Thursday when Bret Boatright ofMulhall and Joe Day of Howe, Texas, turned a 5.8 that earned $749.27 each. Jason Schneeberger and Lee Davis of Ponca City had a 7.3 for second place in the second go worth $561.95 each. Total amount for the team ropers was $11,239 and 58 entries were on the books.

 

There were a total of 341 entries in the riding and timed events, plus a total of 47 girls in the barrel racing. But those 47 girls don't count the two that got the biggest roar from the crowds, both Thursday and Saturday. Those two were the 4-year-old daughter of Rodeo Foundation Chairman Brad and Tina Beaty, Kaitlin Beaty, and the 3-year-old daughter of Rodeo Foundation Vice-Chairman Robin and Sunny Carpenter, Shelby Carpenter. Both were led into the arena, but they were on their own around the barrels both nights and turned in some good times doing it.

 

The girls barrel racers found the going pretty tough Friday and Saturday after the early evening downpour on Friday that made the arena very slow for the swift horses. It improved somewhat on Saturday, but still could not match the earlier competition times. Best run on Saturday was turned in by Angie West of Newalla, Okla., with a 17.83.

 

Kay Young of Overbrook, Okla., had set the pace on Tuesday during slack, with a 16.80 and it held up for first place and $1.207.44. Second went to Deb Mohon, of Gladewater, Texas, in 16.87 on Thursday, for $955.89 and the only other two under 17 seconds toured the pattern on Wednesday. Sharon Smith of Dibble, Okla. with 16.93 nabbed $804.96 while Phyllis Wells of Harrah had 16.99 for $654.03. Total amount avail- able to the girls was $5,031.

 

Steer wrestling proved to be the most popular for participants, with 75 entries who were shooting for a total prize money listed at $13,712.50. Phil Clifton of Oklahoma City pocketed quite a nice sum when his 3.7 topped the second go on Thursday to go with a first go 4.8 of Tuesday to nab the average with an 8.5, netting $1,325.54. His 3.7 also was worth that same amount.

 

Second in average went to Joel Edmondson of Eureka. Kan., who had a 4.0 on Thursday to go with an earlier 4.8 that netted $1.097 plus $982.73 tying with Rick Huddleston, of McAlester, for* second go money.

 

Best time of the event went to Shane Henderson of Winfield, Kan., who had a 3.6 and then put a 5,4 with it to take third in the average. Henderson thus had $1,325.55 for the first go and added $868.46 for his third in the average.

 

Best time on Saturday was a 5.4 by Rick Sims of Copan, Okla., but he had a 14.3 earlier.

Another timed event proved popular when 71 calf roping entries looked at $13,130.50 set up as total prize money. Roy Cooper of Childress, Texas, won it on his two Tuesday times of 9.8 and 9.2 for 19.0. That got him $1,269.28 and an additional $503.34 for a tie for fourth in the first go and $109.42 on a tie for sixth in the second go.

 

Cooper was but a tenth of a second better overall when Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas, had put a 9.1 and a 10.0 during the Tues-day roping for a 19.1. Brazile had $1,050.44 in the first go, and the same amount for second in the average.

 

Best first go was Shawn Franklin of House, N.M., with an 8.5 for $1,269.28 and that helped him get third in the average with 19.9 on a Saturday night effort of
11.4, and a same amount of money Lyndell Walters of Collinsville, Okla., had 8.6 in the second go and top money of $1,269.28 but he had had trouble earlier, with a 23.4.

Best on Saturday was a 9.1 by Doug dark of Wayne, Okla.. who got a tie for fourth in the second go for $503.34. He put that with an 11.4 for sixth in the average at 20.5 and $218.84 more.

 

Steer ropers had done their work all on Tuesday during the 10 or 11 hour slack, depending on who you were listening to in telling the story that it ended at 5 a.m. or 6 a.m. Wednesday. There were 46 entries trying to get into the $11,724 up for grabs.

 

Best times were turned in during the second go, by Buster Record. Buffalo, Okla., at 10.4 and Roy Cooper, as they each got $1,035.62. Top on first go was that of Doug dark. with 11,1 for $1.133.32. But the best average was 24.8 turned in by the consistency of Pawhuska's Rod Hart- ness, 12.5 and 12.3 for 24.8 and $1,133.32. Hartness was third in the first go with 12.5 for $742.52 also.


From a total of 53 entries in the bull riding looking at $5,884.60, winners were best judged on Thursday. That may have been from the weather factor on Friday. Best on Saturday was Hawaiian Wayne Y. Tasaka, who rides for Dodge City Community College in Kansas during the year, with a 74. It was just out of the top six in the money.

 

Winning the top prize was an 82 by Royd Doyal, Pittsburg, Texas, on Thursday for $1,941.92. He was followed by an 80 turned in by Gary Robinson, Greenville, Texas, also on Thursday worth $1,471.15. Another Thursday rider taking home winnings was Ross Kelso of Goodwell, Okla., with a 75 and $294.23, sixth place.

 

Early leader Raymond Wessel of Cedar Point. Kan., finished third with his 78 for $1,059.23 while another Wednesday rider Clay McCallie of Benton, Ark., and a Friday rider Blu Bryant of Nacadoches, Texas, each had 76 and took $559.04 and $559.03 respectively.

 

Saddle bronc and bareback bronc riders had to compete two different times in the rodeo. There were 22 entries in saddle bronc looking at $4,293.80 and Matt Reed of El Dorado. Kan., took the two go-rounds with his 75 the first night and a 67 on Saturday. That got him $572.51 for the two-go, and $500.95 when he was tied by Paul Peterson, of Texhoma, during first go competition. Best on the second ride was that of Philip Haugen of Weatherford, who had a 73 worth $572.51. Best on Saturday was Haugen's 73, which helped him earn third money of $286.25 in the two go.

 

Bareback riders numbered 16 for $3,886.40 and Payne Dobler put up an 84 the very first night to claim the first go at $518.19. How- ever, Shawn Frey, of Marlow had an 82 later in the rodeo and put a 78 with that to earn second go, and total on two, of 160 compared to Dobler's 156. That got Frey $518.19 twice, and $388.64 additionally for his 78 which was second in the first go. Best on Saturday was 75 by Steve Abernathy of Broken Arrow. It got him third money in second go, plus third money in the two and he placed third in the first go as well, each worth $259.09.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen competition ended, with Amy Bull, 16-year-old daughter of Raymond and Marie Bull of McAlester, Okla., being crowned.

 

One Armed Bandit John Payne of Shidler used one rig to wow the crowd Saturday. He found two longhorn steers well up in the north part of the arena, and then found two others (with riders) in the bucking chutes. He made all four go to the top of the trailer, (one with rider still on), and then continued to have the crowd cheering as he left the arena.

 

In another specialty act, Red River Riders made a flawless appearance in precision riding.

 

Clown Rick Young lost his favorite alligator (again), and bullfighters Kevin Rich and Mike Johnson each had displayed their specialty of keeping the bulls from getting to any of the contestants.

 

And Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid kept the show running with his voice coming over the loudspeakers continuously to keep the crowd informed.

 

Well done Rumford Rodeo Company, Ponca City Rodeo Foundation and Rodeo Posse!

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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