1998

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

Website will be updated as information becomes available.

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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NEW THIS YEAR: Pony Express Relay Race

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 1998

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 12th, 13th, 14th, & 15th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Pickett Family Members
RODEO QUEEN: Stormi Guidry SPECIALTY ACT: Red River Riders & Brice Chapman

GETTIN' DOWN TO RODEO is volunteer Shannon Chambers. The 101 Wild West Rodeo begins Wednesday, Aug. 12 and Chambers welds a new section of pipe to the Chute Heaven area. Hundreds of hours are spent each year by Rodeo committee members and volunteers readying and improving the arena and stands.

 

101 Wild West Rodeo Here Next Week

 

The big show for rodeo fans gets under way one week from tonight!

 

 

And, the 101 Wild West Rodeo is getting bigger and better every year. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation is bent on proving that 1998 will be no different as the final plans begin to take shape for quite a show.

There will be rodeoing from Wednesday through Saturday at the 101 Ranch rodeo arena located at the southwest portion of West Prospect Avenue and North Ash Street, with performances set for 8 p.m. each night.

 

But if the true, every-night attendee doesn't want to miss out on any of the action, there will be some on Tuesday also. That will be when steer roping will be held, scheduled to start at 7 p.m.

All the shows and specialty acts of the rodeo are set to be in the arena during the four regular nights. Aug. 12-15. with the Rafter H Rodeo Company of Dell Hall. located in Tahlequah supplying the stock and producing the show.

Prior to the Saturday night performances Ponca City and area residents will line Grand Avenue for the annual 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, which has been set for 10 a.m.

And if you haven't guessed it by now. the week always is designated as rodeo week. with residents encouraged to dress western throughout the week in promotion of the rodeo.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo dates back to 1905. but the rodeo this year will be the 39th annual event .as a result of some years when it couldn't be held for some reason or another.

On that 1905 date in June, the 101 Ranch gave the world its first professionally staged "round-up" as entertainment for the National Editorial Association meeting — round-up better known today as rodeo. And that was even before Oklahoma statehood!

The activity really picks up on Tuesday next week, when Business After Hours will be held at Cassie's County. That's a meeting of local businesses to kick off the rodeo and promote the rodeo. Slack that night besides the regular steer roping event may include some other timed events. including team roping and calf roping.

Prior to each Grand Entry during the four regular nights of rodeo, there will be a Stick Horse Grand Entry, for youngsters aged three through seven. Each night, the first 101 children at the rodeo will receive a free stick horse to ride in the stick horse grand entry. That will take place promptly at 7:45 p.m. And there will be two family nights, on Wednesday and Thursday, with youngsters under 12 getting in free.

There will be two highlights during the day and early evening on Thursday. There is a Rodeo Foundation golf tournament set for Lew Wentz Golf Course, and Head Country Bar-B Q Restaurant sponsors a free meal prior to the rodeo on Thursday night to" rodeo ticket holders with donations accepted for Domestic Violence. The dinner is held outside the Moose Lodge parking lot.

Friday's specialty includes a rodeo dance at Cassie's County at 10 p.m.. which is usually right after the final rider has either been thrown or goes the full eight seconds on the final bull.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Coronation will be held on Saturday during the rodeo, and the rodeo dance will again be held starting around 10 p.m.

The Rodeo Foundation has acquired the popular Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid again as the rodeo announcer.

Rodeo Contractor Hall is located at Tahlequah and has been in the stock contracting business for the past 35 years, the last 22 as a member of the PRCA. Rafter H Rodeo is a family-run operation on a 1.420-acre ranch 10 miles outside of Tahlequah.

Hall's wife Betty is a PRCA timer and his daughter Shelley a PRCA secretary. Son Justin aids with sorting and flanking of the livestock.

Hall had stock at the National Finals Rodeo in 1997, including Lost Trails and John Doe for bareback riders, and four bulls in the bull riding event. Skoal's Swamp Rat. Skoal's Friendly Freddie, Skoal's King Kong and School Teacher.

He topped off his stock contracting with a Bucking Stock of the Year in saddle bronc with Alibi in 1983.

Kelly Trail Ride Supports 101 Rodeo

 

Dewey Kelly is once again organizing a trail ride in support of the 101 Wild West Rodeo which will be held Aug. 12-15.

Kelly's wagon train and trail ride was started some 38 years ago to support and help keep the tradition of the rodeo and Wild West alive as it is today.

Some people have been on every trail ride sine the rodeos inception in 1960. One man in particular is Howard Anson, now past 80 years of age. Anson has been a great supporter of the 101 Wild West Rodeo with his teams of horses or mules and Conestoga wagon at every rodeo parade as well as the trail rides.

The trail rides will be south of Ponca City with camping every night in the Buffalo pasture of the Dewey Kelly ranch. Anyone interested in joining with this group of cowboys and cowgirls are most certainly welcome. For more information, call Kelly, 580-765-7960 after 8:30 p.m.

The trail ride, which is in memory of Mrs. Dewey Kelly will parade down Grand Avenue at 2 p.m. prior to the first day of the rodeo.

101 Rodeo Parade Set Saturday

 

Final arrangements for the 1998 101 Wild West Rodeo parade are falling into place, according to Rodeo Foundation officials.

 

The parade will start promptly at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 15, beginning at West Grand Avenue and Oak Street and heading east along Grand Avenue ending at Sixth Street.

 

The parade marshals this year will be members of the Pickett family, in honor of the legendary Bill Pickett, a 101 Ranch hand who originated biting a steer on the lip in wrestling it to the ground, a unique form of "bulldogging."

 

Pre-entry is not necessary for the parade this year, according to Chris Short and Stan Long, who are in charge of sending entries on their way as the parade heads east. However, they ask that participants be ready for the lineup at 9:30 a.m.

 

Prior to the parade in that immediate area, will be a pancake breakfast offered by the Masons at the Masonic Lodge on West Grand Avenue, starting at 6:30 a.m. The Public is invited.

 

Floats are requested to meet on the side streets in front of West Grand Church of Christ and progress east. Those riding horses and having horse or animal drawn wagons and carriages should meet in the grassy area south of the church, and be able to produce a Coggins test on request.

 

Classic car entries are to meet on North Peachtree and North Birch, but are requested not to block driveways of residences. Political candidates and participants should be gathering on side streets and in the Lake Street area, and parade officials have asked that for the safety of the youngsters, that participants do not throw candy.

 

For additional information concerning the parade, contact Short at 762-9649 or Long at 765-7387.

Rodeo Clown Gary Parli

 

Rodeo clown Gary Parli of Morrison, Okla., was selected by the top 20 bullriders in the PRCA to serve as barrelman for the National Finals Rodeo in Oklahoma City. He was twice selected as alternate barrelman for the NFR.

 

Parli, a former college agribusiness instructor and rodeo team coach finds the clowning business an exciting summer activity. He started competing in rodeos while in high school, and in college he discovered a demand for clowns and bullfighters. He needed entry fee money and decided to try his hand at the risky profession. As with many clowns who continue in the sport, it just "got in his blood." He was tutored by another great rodeo clown. Buck LeGrand, and started clowning regularly in the summer of 1967.

 

One of Parli's routines involves a pair of newlyweds who travel to the rodeo in a red 1926 Model T Ford. The jalopy goes through a "bunch of comical mechanical flub-ups" inducing a give-and-take between the bride and groom.

 

Having performed at rodeos in 30 states and three Canadian provinces, he has been featured at many of the top contests in North America, including the Elks Helldorado Days in Las Vegas, Nev.; Days of 47 in Salt Lake City, Utah; the College National Finals Rodeo; the Days of "76 in Deadwood, S.D.; the Central States Fair and Rodeo in Rapid City, S.D.; and the celebrated Calgary Stampede. He was also selected by the Top 15 Circuit bullriders to work the Prairie Circuit Finals three times and the Great Lakes Circuit Finals once.

 

In October 1992 Parli was able to obtain one of his professional goals, by clowning the Madison Square Garden rodeo in New York City.

 

In addition, Parli maintains a ranching operation in Morrison, and operates an Allstate Insurance.

Trick-Roper Will Thrill Fans This Week

 

A trick-roping cowboy will be one of the specialty acts for 101 Wild West Rodeo fans to see this week, when Brice Chapman of Lubbock, Texas, brings his act to the arena.

Chapman, who started his career at the age of five, does trick roping that will include trick roping on and off a horse, and horse tricks and dog tricks, plus black-light shows and kickoff tee retrieval.

 

The 28-year-old roper says, "You got to have your hat way back and your foot way forward," as his personal motto. A member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, TTU Former Students Association, and USCRA and USTRA, Chapman received his college education in Ag Economics at Texas Tech University.

 

Besides being a professional trick roper, Chapman is a horseshoer (farrier) and a professional team roper and calf roper in rodeos.

 

His interests besides roping and horses include football, music, dancing, hunting, fishing, Bible study, chess and a number of other activities. He place God, family and friends as his top priorities and is alcohol free, drug free, and promotes the cowboy image.

Rodeo Announcer Popular

 

For the past several years, the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation has had one of the more popular rodeo announcers take the microphone at the start of each night's performance and keep rodeo fans informed no matter whether it be rough stock, timed events or even the clown acts.

 

Things will be no different this year, with the return of the popular Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid, Okla., who calls the shots in the tense, sterile arena of a hospital operating room as his normal duties.

 

Medicine can't match his weekend rodeo hobby for excitement. "I still get butterflies before I start announcing," Phillips smiles, "but unlike years ago, now they fly in formation."

 

As long as this announcer is behind the microphone, you will probably never have to hear the Question. "Is there a doctor in the house?"

Reigning 101 Queen Became 'Miss Teen'

 

Appearing for numerous PRCA rodeos and events throughout the state of Oklahoma this year is Ponca city's own "Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo," Lacey Dale Cully. The daughter of Bob and Debbie Payne of Shidler, Lacey Dale went on to be crowned the 1998 "Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen" at Guthrie's Lazy E Arena last October.

 

Throughout her lifetime she has been extensively involved with horses and music. Showing in 4-H and Kansas Quarter Horse Association as well as a variety of project efforts, contributed to Lacey Cully tier earning the 4-H Gold Achievement Award. Having competed in the goat tying, barrel racing, and pole bending events in junior and high school rodeos, she became first runner-up as a fresh-man, claimed the title of "Miss Kansas High School Rodeo" as a sophomore, and won the contest's speech award both years.

 

Lacey Dale has played the fiddle and violin since the age of 4; performed as concert mistress of her middle and high school orchestras in Arkansas City and McPherson, Kan., and sang in high school symphonic and show choirs. She has earned numerous superior ratings in regional and state music competition, and was the youngest contestant in Winfield's Walnut Valley Fiddle Contest.

 

At the 1994 American Junior Quarter Horse Association World Championship Show in Fort Worth, Lacey Dale placed third in talent and 21st in stake race. She, along with her mother and brother, were named the "1994 Kansas Music Family of the Year."

 

A member of the Shidler United Methodist Church, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, KAYS, and honor roll, Lacey Dale was nominated for both the Hugh O'Brien Youth Scholarship and "Who's Who Among American High School Students."

 

The granddaughter of Holton and Jayne Payne of Shidler, Lloyd and Lucille White of Colby, Kan., and Cloyd and Lea Cully of South Haven, Kan., Lacey Dale plans to major in Communication Arts and minor in music as a freshman at Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford this fall.

More Than 400 Entries For 101 Rodeo

 

The big The big show for rodeo fans in Ponca City gets under way this week!

 

And, the 101 Wild West Rodeo is getting bigger and better every year. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation is bent on proving that 1998 will be no different as the final plans begin to take shape for quite a show.

 

To prove that the 101 Wild West Rodeo is getting bigger and better, is the number of entries that have been approved. Rodeo Foundation officials have been informed that more than 400 entries are slated to appear in the rodeo here during the week's performances.

 

There will be rodeoing from Wednesday through Saturday at the 101 Ranch rodeo arena located at the southwest portion of West Prospect Avenue and North Ash Street, with performances set for 8 p.m. each night.

 

But if the true, every-night attendee doesn't want to miss out on any of the action, there will be some on Tuesday also. That will be when steer roping will be held, scheduled to start at 7 p.m. There will be slack for calf roping, team roping and steer wrestling, plus some girls barrel racing Tuesday also, with those activities beginning at 4 p.m. and taking up again after the steer roping event.

 

All the shows and specialty acts of the rodeo are set to be in the arena during the four regular nights, Aug. 12-15, with the Rafter H Rodeo Company of Dell Hall, located in Tahlequah supplying the stock and producing the show.

 

Prior to the Saturday night performances Ponca City and area residents will line Grand Avenue for the annual 101 Wild West Rodeo parade, which has been set for 10 a.m.

 

And if you haven't guessed it by now, the week always is designated as rodeo week, with residents encouraged to dress western throughout the week in promotion of the rodeo.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo dates back to 1905, but the rodeo this year will be the 39th annual event as a result of some years when it couldn't be held for some reason or another.

 

On that 1905 date in June, the 101 Ranch gave the world its first professionally staged "round-up" as entertainment for the National Editorial Association meeting — round-up better known today as rodeo. And that was even before Oklahoma statehood!

 

The activity really picks up on Tuesday next week, when Business After Hours will be held at Cassie's County. That's a meeting of local businesses to kick off the rodeo and promote the rodeo.

 

Prior to each Grand Entry during the four regular nights of rodeo, there will be a Stick Horse Grand Entry, for youngsters aged three through seven. Each night, the first 101 children at the rodeo will receive a free stick horse to ride in the stick horse grand entry. That will take place promptly at 7:30 p.m. And there will be two family nights, on Wednesday and Thursday, with youngsters under 12 getting in free.

 

Also, on Wednesday, it will be KPNC night, with the local radio station sponsoring ticket vouchers and remote broadcast. Friday will be Wrangler night.

 

There will be two highlights during the day and early evening on Thursday. There is a Rodeo Foundation golf tournament set for Lew Wentz Golf Course, and
Head Country Bar-B-Q Restaurant sponsors a free meal prior to the rodeo on Thursday night to rodeo ticket holders with donations accepted for Domestic Violence. The dinner is held outside the Moose Lodge parking lot.

 

Friday's specialty includes a rodeo dance at Cassie's County at 10 p.m., which is usually right after the final rider has either been thrown or goes the full eight seconds on the final bull.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Coronation will be held on Saturday during the rodeo, and the rodeo dance will again be held starting around 10 p.m.


The Rodeo Foundation has acquired the popular Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid again as the rodeo announcer.

 

Rodeo Contractor Hall is located at Tahlequah and has been in the stock  contracting business for the past 35 years, the last 22 as a member of the  PRCA. Rafter H Rodeo is a family-run operation on a 1,420-acre ranch 10 miles outside of Tahlequah.

 

Hall's wife Betty is a PRCA timer and his daughter Shelley a PRCA secretary. Son Justin aids with sorting and flanking of the livestock.

 

Hall had stock at the National Finals Rodeo in 1997, including Lost Trails and John Doe for bareback riders, and four bulls in the bull riding event, Skoal's Swamp Rat, Skoal's Friendly Freddie, Skoal's King Kong and School Teacher.

 

He topped off his stock contracting with a Bucking Stock of the Year in saddle bronc with Alibi in 1983.

Cornerstone Will Honor Pickett, 101 Ranch Cowboy Bull-Dogger

A cornerstone to honor Bill Pickett will be unveiled at 9 a.m. Saturday at the intersection of Third Street and East Grand Avenue. Ponca City Mayor Tom Leonard will do the honors, with the help of 101 Ranch Old Timer officers, in honor of Pickett, a 101 Ranch cowboy, who is credited with inventing bull-dogging.

 

Bill Pickett's great-grandson, Frank Phillips from Maryland, and great-granddaughter. Belle Gomez from California, will attend the unveiling with other family members. They will be Grand Marshals of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade at 10 a.m. on Grand Avenue. They are mem-bers of the 101 Ranch Old Timers and will attend the reunion at the Fourth Street Conoco Clubhouse at 1 p.m. They will also visit Bill Pickett's grave on Monument Hill at 5 p.m. before attending the Chuck Wagon at the 101 Ranch site. At 8 p.m. they will be honored guests at the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

Lu Vason, from Denver, Colo., who is over the Bill Pickett International Rodeo, is also expected to attend.

 

This marker was made possible by donations from friends who actually knew Bill Pickett, and those who felt that this dedicated cowboy for the 101 Ranch from 1905-1932 should be honored. Any excess money from donors for the cornerstone will be used on the 101 Ranch Old Timers, Phase II, Monument Hill project.

 

Monument Hill, on Oklahoma 156, "The 101 Ranch Memorial Highway," just north of Marland, is owned by a non-profit organization which has expressed a desire to donate this 12 acres to the 101 Ranch Old Timers organization, also incorporated and a non-profit organization. This will allow the Old Timers to proceed with their plans to build a parking area off Oklahoma 156, a walkway up the hill and a fenced area to protect White Eagle Monument, Bill Pickett's grave and others buried there.

 

The White Eagle Monument is an ancient Indian Trail Marker. The Miller Brothers restored it in 1927, put a White Eagle on top, and dedicated it to White Eagle who was Chief of the Ponca. Chief White Eagle is buried in the Native American Cemetery, and not at the monument.

Rodeo Starts Early With Slack Rounds

 

The thrills of the 101 Wild West Rodeo will become official tonight, the first night of the four-night run of the performances at the 101 Ranch arena at the intersection of North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

 

But there were some thrills and good times at the slack performances Tuesday night that also included the full event of steer roping. And it proved to be good Stock from newly-acquired rodeo producer, Dell Hall and his Rafter H Rodeo Company, to get things off big for the 1998 performances.

 

The Grand Entry for each night, tonight through Saturday, begins at 8 p.m., following a 7:30 p.m. Stick Horse Grand Entry. The first 101 youngsters to the rodeo each night will receive a stick horse to ride in their grand entry.

 

But Tuesday night, into the first couple of hours Wednesday (today), a total of 55 entries went through their paces in the steer roping event—twice! And there was slack beginning at 4 p.m. in calf roping, steer wrestling, team roping and barrel racing.

 

Almost all of those performers in slack, will be back some time during the rodeo over the next four nights, in an effort to claim actual titles in each event.

 

Take for instance, the girls barrel racing. Setting a standard for the rest of the week were three out-of-staters, led by Toni Cummings of Pleasant Hill, Mo., who reined the clover-leaf pattern in 17.79. That was followed by Tammy Ramsey of Abbyville, Kan., in 18.00 and Deb Garrison of Derby, Kan., in 18.05.

 

The steer wrestling got off to a really quick start with no less than eight between 4.0 and 4.7. That's pretty quick, but considering where some of those steer wrestlers are from, it isn't surprising. Hailed by many as "the steer wrestling capitol of Oklahoma," the efforts of Spud Duvall, Checotah, at 4.0 and Dusty Duvall, also Checotah, 4.2 put their marks at the top of the list.

 

Then there were others, including Shawn Johnson, also Checotah, 4.3 followed by Rodney Burk, Benton, Ark., with 4.5. Next is Jeff Babek of Granite, Okla., at 4.6 and three including Ponca City's Stockton Graves, at 4.7. The other two at 4.7 are Mark Owen of Oolagah and Jeff Johnston, Thedford, Neb.

 

Tops so far in the first go-round of calf roping is Bill Huber, Albia, Iowa, at 9.2 followed by Wichita's Kevin Loyd at 9.4. Then comes Bill Hutto of Cleveland, Texas, at 10.0 and Larry Snyder, Medicine Lodge, Kan.. 10.2. Graves of Ponca City at 10.6 joins Delee Peterson, Bartlesville, to fill out the top five positions of the first go-round.

 

A pair of nationally-known team ropers Charles Pogue of Ringling and Britt Bockius, Claremore, did the double-catch in 5.6 and that's just four-tenths of a second faster than Joel Maker of Tahlequah and Nick Rowland of Antlers, who had a 6.0 to nip the Llano, Texas team of Tee Woolman and Tyier Magness at 6.2. That is followed by a pair of Kansans, Larry Snyder of Medicine Lodge and Mike Garten of Harper, at 6.3.

 

Ace Bowman of Pawhuska used his first go-round lead of 9.7 to go with a 12.0, that put him in first of the steer ropers at 21.7. That was just split-seconds faster than the two catches of 1997 World Steer Roping Champion Guy Alien of Lovington, N.M. Alien had a combined 22.3 off his first go of 10.7 (third) and an 11.6 in the second go.

 

Best in the second go-round of steer ropers was Pake McEntire of Pittsburg, Okla., with a 9.0 which bumped Bowman's arena tying 9.7 from the record books.

101 Ranch Old Timers Reunion Marking 30th Year In August

The 101 Ranch Old Timer Reunion was organized for Old Timers who worked on the Miller Brothers 101 Ranch, their Wild West Show, or lived on the ranch.


They meet, talk about old times, and do what they can to keep the memory of the 101 Ranch alive. Each year there are some that come to the reunion for the first time, and others who return after a long period of time. Many are local and many from all over the United States.

 

Johnny Brown, 97, of Perry, is expected to attend the unveiling of the cornerstone of Bill Pickett on Grand Avenue in Ponca City, and the Reunion. He knew Bill Pickett well, and has many stories to tell.

 

Several members of the Miller Family are expected to attend: Joe C. Miller Jr. of Ponca City; several of his nieces and nephews: Elizabeth Harth Wyman, Rogers, Ark.; Virginia Harth Richards, Fort Worth, Texas, daughters of Alice Miller Harth; Marilyn Miller Harris, Rogers, Ark., daughter of George Miller, Jim Miller, Calidonia, Mich.; Joseph Miller, Alexandria, Ky., sons of William Joseph Miller, and their mother Joyce Miller of Michigan.

 

In 1968 the 101 Ranch Old Timers met in Ponca City for the first time and organized. Mike Sokoll of Ponca City became president soon afterwards and remained until his death at age 96, the day of the August 1991 Old Timers Reunion. Sokoll worked on the ranch and was a roper with the wild west show between the years 1909-1915.

 

Sam Hill of Ponca City became president in 1991 and served until his death in January 1996 at age 81. He had worked on the ranch riding fence, and in the wild west show as a bronc rider from 1929-1931. He used to say he would work at any- thing, as long as it was on the back of a horse.

 

Jean Evans of Marland was appointed by Sam to take his place. Her father, Jack Webb, was a sharp shooter and trick roper for the Miller Brothers for years after the 101 Ranch Wild West Show went back on the road in 1925.

 

The 101 Ranch Old Timers organization has owned the 101 Ranch Headquarters land since 1996. It is an Oklahoma Historical Site and a National Historic Landmark. They opened three acres of the site as a picnic area and maintain this site, as well as Cowboy Hill, themselves.

 

Sheriff Marion VanHoesen, the late Undersheriff Sid Cookerly, and new Undersheriff Craig Countryman have been very helpful by letting men from the County Detention Center help the Old Timer members clean the ranch site, as well as set up the picnic tables in 1996, and the three new 26 foot steel Hag poles in 1997. They also help clean the area for the Chuck Wagon Dinner each August.

 

The 101 Ranch Old Timers and 101 Ranch Old Timer Auxiliary are $15 yearly. More information can be obtained from secretary/treasurer Linda Rennie, 14476 E. U.S. 60, Burbank, Okla., 74633.

Contestants Kick Up Heels As Light Rain Settles Dust

 

Mother Nature knew exactly what she was doing. A light rainfall in the early evening hours was just what could have been ordered at the 101 Ranch rodeo arena, as it settled dusty conditions for the most part and cooled things off to near room temperature.

 

And the cowboys and cowgirls, plus the stock of Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company, responded to the comfortable conditions perfectly on the first official night of the 1998 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

It'll be another family night tonight for the second night in a row, and youngsters who received stick horses for the Stick Horse Grand Entry on Wednesday can return tonight with their stick horses for another grand entry. Stick horses will be available each night to the first 101 youngsters ages 3-7 showing up and that grand entry will be at 7:30 p.m.

 

Tonight is another special night for rodeo fans with tickets, as Head Country Bar-B-Q Restaurant will be sponsoring a free meal prior to the rodeo. The dinner is held outside at the Moose Lodge parking lot, and ticket holders can eat free, while any donations will be accepted for Domestic Violence.

 

But all of that became secondary as the rodeo began shortly after '8 p.m., with two National Finals Rodeo champions appearing to wow the fans attending on Wednesday. Tonight's performers, along with Friday and Saturday, will have to really put on their best efforts to overcome some of the times and scores last night.

 

Take for instance the bare- back bronc riding event, where 1997 NFR champion Eric Mouton of Weatherford, Okla., got a high score but it just was good enough at the present time for a second-place tie with Tim Williamson, Atlanta, Mo., both at 76. But they were four shy of the 80 that Jason Jeter from Arlington, Texas, nabbed during the event.

 

While Mouton had to settle for present runner-up honors, the crowd that stayed through the barrel racing event saw why Kristie Peterson and her horse Bozo are defending champions of the 1997 NFR.

 

Peterson put an exclamation point to her effort almost a full four-tenths of a second better than second place, and that's a lot of room. The Elbert, Colo,, champion Peterson toured the three-barrel cloverleaf design in 16.99 while a pair of Texas barrel racers were three-hundredths of a second within each other. Melissa Hubier of Cleveland, Texas, had a 17 35 and Janet Stover of Athens, Texas, was third by the finish of the event at 17.38.

 

And while the barrel racers thrilled the crowd near the end of the first night's performance, some really good rough stock from Rafter H pro-vided fans and potential riders some good times, depending where they were sitting. However, bull riders Ben Duggar of Blue Springs, Miss., and Danell Tipton of Spencer, Okla., while not being able to sit comfortably and watch, sat well enough on some of the bigger bulls at the rodeo in the last few years. Duggar did it just one point better according to the judges, with an 82 while Tipton got an 81. Joining them in the present standings at third is Fred Boettcher (no!, not our Fred) from Rice Lake, Wis., getting a 77.

 

There was a little more daylight between first and third in the saddle bronc event, when Tom Reeves of Eagle Butte, S.D., got a 78. Next was Philip Haugen of Weather-ford, Okla., with a 72 and then it was Haskell's Don Reno at 67.

 

Maybe it was the picture on the front page of The News Wednesday that inspired Randy Davis of Blanchard, and maybe not. Whether it was or not Davis got the best of things in the calf roping on Wednesday to make the tie in 8.8. That was almost a full second better than Rick McLemore of Gracemont, Okla., at 9.7. Maury Tate of Apache, squeaked in at 9.9 for third Wednesday.

 

The steer wrestlers also pushed their performances to some Oklahoma crowd pleasing times, when Cody Brown of Wilburton posted a 4.0; Stan Williamson, Okmulgee, 4.1 and Shawn Johnson, Checotah, 4.2.

 

Team ropers also realized the fast track in the non-dusty arena, with Bret Boatright of Mulhall and Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas, doing the job in 5.8. That was one-tenth of a second better than Foreman Mader of Jenks and Jeff Carney of Sperry, who had a 5.9. Next on Wednesday was an Arizona team of Chad Saunders, Greenbrier and Michael Harris, Vilonia, at 7.3.

Schneeberger Brings Life To 101 Wild West Crowd

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo got just what it needed Thursday night when a Ponca City performer roped his way into the lead in the calf roping event.

 

Jerome Schneeberger, who is running 12th in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association listing for calf ropers en route to a possible berth in the National Finals Rodeo, streamlined the event Thursday with an 8.1 timing in the calf roping event.

 

Schneeberger, who has been working his way up the ladder and continues to impress other calf ropers in the nation, however was unable to repeat the feat in the team roping event as his heeling effort came up empty.

 

But it was Schneeberger who certainly got the loudest roar from Thursday night's crowd, although there were some other changes in the events. Not all of the events got new leaders, but that may come tonight or Saturday when the 101 Wild West Rodeo winds down in the final two night sessions.

 

The Saturday performance at 8 p.m. will be following the 10 a.m. parade downtown of the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade. That will be along Grand Avenue, from Oak Street to Sixth Street.

 

The lone new leader in the rodeo came from the team roping efforts Chad Saunders, Greenbrier, Ariz., and partner Michael Harris, Vilonia. Ariz., when they completed the double catch in 5.4. Bret Boatright, Mullall and Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas, they put the stopper on heir calf at 5.6. That will go nicely with a 5.8 for an 11.4 timing. Thursday night, Tee Woolman and Tyler Magnus, both of Llano, Texas, got their second 6.2 of the rodeo and now are sitting with 12.4. Saunders and Harris will use their 5.4 to go with an earlier 7.3 for a 12.7.

 

Best in barrel racing Thursday light came from an Oklahoma girl, Tye Petska of Lexington, with a 17.25. Sue Miller of Lott, Texas had a 17.35 and Kristan Crain of Fort Smith, Ark., had a 7.39. They will still be behind bristle Peterson of Elbert, Colo. Peterson, the National Finals Rodeo defending champion, had 16.99 on Wednesday. Melissa Hubier of Cleveland, Texas, had 17.35 and Janet Stover, Athens, Texas had a 17.38, so there are some close times throughout that event.

Thursday's bull riders were unable to come up with scores similar to  Wednesday. Best on Thursday was a pair of 76s, by Justin Daugherty, of Fayetteville, Texas, and Thad B. Bothwell, Rapid City, S.D. But on Wednesday. Ben Duggar of Blue Springs, Miss., had an 82 and David Tipton of Spencer, Okla., had an 81 to vault into the lead, followed by another on Wednesday, Fred Boettcher of Rice Lake, Wis., with a 77.

 

Schneeberger's 8.1 took out Randy Davis' 8.8 of Blanchard, Okla. And Kenny Harris of Choctaw had a 9.5 that will also get into the top rankings.

 

Thursday's best in the saddle bronc riding was a 77 by Ranee Bray of Texhoma, followed by Matthew McCloy of Shamrock, Texas, 75. Next came a 74 by Mike Outhier of Weatherford, Okla. But Wednesday, Tom Reeves of Eagle Butte, S.D. had a 78, presently in the lead.

 

Best in the steer wrestling Thursday were Jeff Babek, Granite, Okla., with a 5.1 and Brad Kreikemeier of Laramie, Wyo., with a 5.4. G.V. Gulager, Tahleq-uah would-have pumped- into the lead with a 3.8, but was caught getting out of the runway just a bit too quick, drawing a 10-second penalty. Best on Wednesday was Cody Browne of Wilbur-ton at 4.0, followed by Stan Williamson of Okmulgee at 4.1 and Shawn Johnson of Checotah at 4.2.

 

In the bareback bronc riding, best on Thursday was a 71 by Shawn Frey of Marlow. Tops so far are three Wednesday scores, an 80 by Jason Jeter of Arlington, Texas, and a pair of 76s by Eric Mouton, Weatherford, Okla., and Tim Wilkinson, Atlanta, Mo.

Top Stock Tests Riders As Competition Heats Up

 

Near-perfect weather greeted the 101 Wild West Rodeo fans for Friday night as the third "official" night of rodeo unveiled some new leaders heading into Saturday's final round.

 

The stock from owner Dell Hall's Rafter H Livestock Company provided participants with some tough competition, just as it has the previous four nights, including Tuesday's slack. It was on Tues-day, starting shortly after 4 p.m., that steer wrestlers, calf ropers and team ropers got into the arena for their first go in the two-go competition of the rodeo and the steer roping title was decided. There were a few Tuesday barrel racers also, but none will be figuring in the top money.

 

That Tuesday steer roping saw Ace Bowman of Pawhuska use a first-go 9.7 to go with a 12.0 in the second go in claiming the average at 21.7. Pake McEntire of Pittsburg, Okla., had a 9.0 for second-go top money.

 

But it was that Rafter H stock, with much larger bulls than several years before, "that have made quite a difference in the performances this year," Rodeo Foundation President Brad Beaty said.

 

Heavier bulls from Rafter H weren't the only noticeable difference in this year's rodeo, as the bucking broncs for the most part would continue to buck, even after the whistle sounding the end of a rider's eight-second ride. And the steers made it tough on steer wrestlers, plus fast calves making it tough for ropers to catch.

 

About the only thing that Rafter H didn't have to provide were the horses for the barrel racing.

 

However, fans were treated to the best times of the rodeo in barrel'racing as two girls broke the 17-second barrier to wrestle the top spot away from National Finals Rodeo champion Kristie Peterson of Elbert, Colo., who had a 16.99 on Wednesday.

 

In fact, five barrel racers pushed their way to the top seven spots, with the first two on Friday doing the clover-leaf pattern under 17 seconds. "Wow!" was about the only description that Dr. Lynn Phillips, popular announcer from Enid. could say after the rides of Nancy Powell. Kinta. Okla.. with a 16.97 and then Deborah Mohon. Gladewater. Texas, with a 16.92 (that put her into the top spot) Phillips chatters throughout the rodeo, keeping fans informed about what's coming up and participants prepared for what they have to do.

 

Next in the barrel racing were two others on Friday, Paula Phillips of Sallisaw. 17.14 and Sara Zaieski. Blanchard. 17.21. Tye Petska. Lexington. Okla.. had 17.25 on Thursday and was tied by Jamie Berry. Checotah. 17.25 on Friday for sixth-seventh.

 

The rodeo fans got their money's worth from other participants, including clown Gary Parli of Ponca City. and his partners in the arena Kevin Rich and Mike Johnson. They've been doing it together in the 101 Wild West Rodeo for the past few years, and continue to come up with some new ideas to get the fans roaring with laughter.

 

Specialty acts on Friday included the Red River Riders of Clarksville. Texas, plus the con tracted act of trick roper Brice Chapman. Lubbock. Both were well received, with Chapman appearing for his third night in a row.

 

With the cooperation and assistance of Hall's daughter Shelley. who is a PRCA secretary, and wife Betty, a PRCA timer. Rafter H Livestock Company provided "corrected" scores throughout the first four nights of the rodeo — despite having to return to Tahlequah for other assignments during the day. That's dedication through and through! But they were going to be able to stay in Ponca City after the Friday performance.

 

Besides the barrel racing take over top spots on Friday, saddle bronc rider Bud Longbrake of Dupree. S.D.. rode a Rafter H bull to an 81 and took over the top spot in that event by four points. Tom Reeves of Eagle Butte. S.D.. had set the pace early on Wednesday 'with a 78 and Ranee Bray of Texhoma had a 77 on Thursday. Matt McCloy of Shamrock, Texas, had a 75 and that was followed also on Thursday by Mike Outhier of Weatherford. Okla.. with a 74.

 

Best Friday effort in the bareback bronc riding was Jon Brockway of Fort Worth with a 75. but that only pushed him into fourth behind three Wednesday riders. Jason Jeter of Arlington. Texas. had an 80 on Wednesday and that was followed by a pair of 76s. Eric Mouton of Weatherford. Okla.. the defending NFR champion, and Tim Wilkinson. Atlanta, Mo.

 

In steer wrestling Friday Rusty Rush of Bixby had a 4,6 and Glen Clark of Woodward had a 5.1 but they are behind the Wednesday catchers ofCody Browne. Wilburton. 4.0: Stan Williamson. Okmulgee. 4.1; and Shawn Johnson. Checotah. 4.2. Thursday. Jeff Babek of Granite had a 5.1.

 

Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger. who wowed the crowd on Thursday night, continued to pace the calf roping event with his 8.1. That is followed by Randy Davis of Blanchard. who had 8.8 on "Wednesday. Best time for Friday was Kadiii Boardman of Jackson. Mo.. who had 10.2. Sandwiched in between are Kenny Harris. Choctaw. 9.5; Rick McLemore, Gracemont. 9.7; and Maury Tate. Apache. 9.9.

 

Best team roping on Friday came from Charles Pogue. Ringling with partner Britt Bockius. Claremore. who did the two-rope trick at 6.5. But they were down the list in the second go-rounds. Leaders in the second go are Chad Saunders. Greenbrier, Ariz. and partner Michael Harris, Vilo-nia. Ariz.. with 5.4 who had a 7.3 in the first go to push the average to 12.7.

 

That's not good enough however. so far. with Bret Boatright of Mulhall and Kory Koontz, Sudan. Texas, posting a 5.6 on Thursday and a 5.8 on Wednesday to take the lead in average at 11.4. Fore-man Mader. Jenks and Jeff Car-ney. Sperry are second in average at 11.9 with a 5.9 on Wednesday to go with the Tuesday slack of 6.0. Tee Woolman and Tyier Magnus of Llano. Texas, were consistent. with a pair of 6.2s for 12.4 in aver-age, sitting third at the present time.

 

Friday's best bull riding effort was a 75 by Avelino Baca of Bosque, N.M.. and that's sixth place. Best came on Wednesday with Ben Duggar. Blue Springs. Miss.. getting an 82. That was followed on Wednesday by Danell Tipton. Spencer. 81 and Fred Boettcher. Rice Lake, Wis.. 77. Thursday had a pair of 76s for fourth-fifth, from Justin Daugher-ty. Fayetteville. Texas and Thad Bothwell. Rapid City. S.D.

Action Hot And Heavy For Wild West Rodeo

 

A near-capacity crowd could not have been disappointed during final action of the 1998 101 Wild West Rodeo at the 101 Ranch arena Saturday night.

 

While not all of the Saturday performers were able to wrestle top money away from other night performers, there were a couple of standouts including team ropers Joe Day of Howe, Texas, and his "heeler" partner Boogie Ray of Rockwell, Texas, getting the job done in the event in 5.2 seconds. That was the best in team roping for the entire rodeo, not only for just the second-go. It earned them $560.16 apiece.

 

Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger maintained his grip on the top money in the second go-round of calf-roping with his 8.1 on Wednesday. While he didn't have that type of luck in the first go-round during slack Tuesday, Schneeberger was clearly the best calf roper of the rodeo with the 8.1. It earned him $1,257.63.

 

It was also 101 Wild West Rodeo queen competition night, with Stormi Guidry of Yale, Okla., becoming the 1998 queen.

 

And in rough stock, the bulls from the Rafter H Livestock Company of Dell Hall, Tahlequah, just seemed to get better with each night's performance.  Wednesday's rodeo fans saw Ben Duggar of Blue Springs, Miss., get an 82 and Danell Tipton of Spencer, Okla., get an 81. They maintained those two top spots throughout the other three nights, to win $1,892.55 and $1,433.75 apiece.

 

But Saturday fans saw Blu Bryant of Nacogdoches, Texas, ride for a 79 score thus earning $1,032.30, for third. Another Wednesday rider, Fred Boettcher of Rice Lake, Wis., had a 77 for $688.20 and there were three 76s during the other two nights for $290.40 apiece. They included Justin Daugherty of Fayetteville, Texas; Thad Bothwell of Rapid City, S.D., and Avelino Baca of Bosque, N.M.

 

Bryant was one of only two bull riders out of 14 on the program to stay the full eight-seconds on those large, quick moving stock of Rafter H. However, Enid's Ash Potter score of 70 just wasn't good enough for prize money. There were a total of 50 bull riders the four nights.

 

Best in the barrel racing on Saturday came from the effort of Terry Hughes, an Osage County girl out of Barnsdall, who had a 17.08. That earned her fourth place money of $714.06, and a scant 16-hundredths of a second out of first.

 

First in the barrels went to Deb Mohon of Glade-water, Texas, with a 16.92 earning $1,153.48 while second was taken by Nancy Powell of Kinta, Okla., 16.97 for $988.70. Defending National Finals Rodeo champion Kristie Peterson of Elbert, Colo., finished third after wowing a Wednesday crowd going 16.99. That was good enough however for $823.92.

 

Paula Phillips of Sallisaw was fifth with 17.14 for $549.28 and on Saturday, Karin Henry of Emporia, Kan., rode to a 17.18 sixth place finish for $439.42. Next were Sarah Zaieski of Blanchard at 17.21, $329.56; a pair of 17.25s by Tye Petska of Lexington, Okla. and Jamie Berry of Checotah for $192.24 apiece and splitting 10th were Sue Miller, Loft, Texas and Melissa Hubier of Cleveland, Texas, both at 17.35 for $54.92 each. There were 51 barrel racers competing in the rodeo.

 

Saturday's bareback bronc riders did get into the money when Shane Call of Hulbert, Okla., got a 79 for $1,191.25 — not bad, but for second money. First went to a Wednesday rider, Jason Jeter of Arlington, Texas, with an 80, for $1,572.45. Dennis Foyil of Guthrie rode to a 75 on Saturday that put him in a two-way tie for fifth with Friday's Jon Brockway of Fort Worth. They got $285.90 apiece. Third and fourth was split as 1997 NFR champion Eric Mouton of Weatherford, Okla., and Tim Wilkinson, Atlanta, Mo., each had a 76 on Wednesday that stood up for that spot gaining $714.75 apiece. There were 40 bareback bronc riders in the rodeo.

 

From 35 entries in the team roping competition, best average came from the ropes of Bret Boatright of Mulhall and Kory Koontz of Sudan, Texas. They had 11.4 on two catches, with a 5.8 on the first go and 5.6 second. The 11.4 earned $560.16 while the 5.8 was second for $420.12 and the 5.6 was third for $280.08 — not bad when totaled up to make $1,260.36 each.

 

Second average went to Charles Pogue of Ringling and Britt Bockius of Claremore as they had 12.1 for $420.12 after earning first go top money of $560.16 with a 5.6. Third average went to Tee Wool-man and Tyier Magnus of Llano, Texas, who had a pair of 6.2s for 12.4 to earn $280.08. The second go 6.2 also got them a tie for fourth for $70.02 each.

 

Fourth in average went to Chad Saunders, of Greenbrier, Ariz., and partner Michael Harris of Vilonia, Ariz., who had 12.7 for $140.04 apiece after a second place finish in the second-go at 5.4 for $420.12 apiece.

 

Other first-go money winners included Foreman Mader of Jenks and partner Jeff Carney of Sapulpa, who had 5.9 in the first go to earn $280.08 apiece and Joel Maker of Tahlequah and his partner Nick Rowland of Antlers, at 6.0 for $140.04 apiece. In the second-go, Shannon Lee of Gotebo, Okla., and partner Willie Alien of Purcell had a 6.2 for a fourth-place tie and they got $70.02 apiece.

 

Billy Bob Hutto of Cleveland, Texas, had an 8.7 and a 10.0 to get best average in calf roping at 18.7 for $1,257.63. His 8.7 earned £ three-way tie for second money, netting $823.96 and the 10.0 got a three-way tie for third in the first go for $607.12. Thai easily topped the calf-roping money winners with $2,688.71 There were 70 entries in calf roping.

 

Next came Randy Davis of Blanchard with an 18.8 average to gel $1,040.79 on a 10.0 and 8.8. The 8.t in second go earned $390.29 for fifth while the 10.0 gained a three way tie for third in the first go for $607.12.

 

Third in average went to Delee Peterson of Bartlesville who had 19.3 for $823.96. He had 8.7 for a tie for second behind Schneeberger in the second go worth $823.96 also. Bill Huber of Albk had a 19.6 for $607.13 in fourth place for average, getting a 9.2 for the first go for top money there at $1,257.63. Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas, had a 19.9 in aver age for fifth and $390.29 and also sixth in second go at 9.3 for $216.83.

 

Besides Huber, Davis and Hutto in the first go, money winners included Kevin Lloyd of Wichita 9.4, second for $1,040.79; David Lawson, Newcastle, Okla., 10.0 for third and $607.12; and Larry Snyder of Medicine Lodge, Kan., sixth for $216.83.

 

Besides Schneeberger, Peterson, Hutto, Davis and Brazile getting money in the second go, was T. W. Snyder of Medicine Lodge tied for third with an 8.7 for $823.96.

 

None of the steer wrestler; could crack five seconds on Saturday, with the best being Daniel Adams of Butler, Okla., with a 5.3. There were a total of 74 steer wrestlers during the rodeo.

 

That couldn't earn any money in the average, as Shawn Johnson used a pair of third place finishes to post an average mark of 8.5 on 4.3 in the first go and 4.2 in the second go. The average was worth 1,313.89, while the other two marks got $860.82 apiece for the Checotah steer wrestler. That's 3,035.53 for the rodeo.

 

Next came Spud Duvall, also of Checotah, with 9.1 on 4.0 and 5.1 for $1,087.35. Duvall's 4.0 earned $1,313.89 also in the first go and the 5.1 was out of the money in the second go. Jeff Babek of Granite, Okla., had 9.7 for third in average on a 4.6 in the second go, $407.75 and 5.1. The average got him $860.82.

 

Fourth went to Rusty Rash of Bixby, with 9.8 on a 5.2 and a second go fourth spot of 4.6 ($634.29). The 9.8 got him $634.29 also. Stan Williamson was fifth in average with 10.1 utilizing a 4.2 in the second go. The second go was worth $1,087.35 and the average $407.15. Sixth went to Brad Kreikemeier of Laramie, Wyo., who edged his way in with a tie for sixth in the second go at 4.9 for $113.26 and his average got him $226.53.

 

Following Spud Duvall in the first go money was Dusty Duvall, also of  Checotah, 4.2, $1,087.35; Johnson in third; Rodney Burks,  Benton, Ark., 4.5, $634.29; Babek in fifth; Mark Owen, Oolagah; Stockton Graves of Ponca City; and Jeff Johnston, Thedford, Neb., all at 4.7 for $75.51 each.

 

In the second go Cody Browne of Wilburton was first with a 4.0 for $1,313.89 followed by Williamson, Johnson, Rash, And then T.W. Snyder for $407.75 and two at sixth, including Steve Orth of Paoli, Okla., and John Kloeckler, Checotah, each at 4.9 for $113.26 apiece.

 

There were no changes in the saddle bronc riding on Saturday with the best being a 71 by Jordan Brumbelow, Austin, Texas and second by Butch Braden Jr., Welch, Okla, with a 70.

 

Money winners included Bud Longbrake, Dupree, S.D., 81, for $1,380.39; Tom Reeves, Eagle Butte, S.D., 78, $1,045.75; Ranee Bray, Texhoma, 77,  $752.94; Matthew McCloy, Shamrock, Texas, 74, $292.81 and a pair of 72s by Bret Franks, Goodwell and Philip Haugen, Weatherford, for $104.57 each.

 

Pawhuska's Ace Bowman on Tuesday won the average in steer roping for $1,187.30 with a com- bined 21.7 as he had 9.7 in the first go worth that same amount. His 12.0 didn't get money, but was good enough to push him into the top spot of the average.

 

Rafter H secretary, Shelley Hall, provided times, scores and prize money figures.

 

Special awards concluded the 101 Wild West Rodeo Saturday night, as Donna Jeffries-White and 101 Beverage won recognition from the Rodeo Foundation for the business "Friend of the Rodeo" The individual "Friend of the Rodeo" award went to Sandy Dickey. Also, Rick Waddell, for his special work on the rodeo activities, received a special award, as "king of the southwest" getting a serape.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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