2002

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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NEW THIS YEAR: Pony Express Relay Race

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2002

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 14th, 15th, 16th, & 17th

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Bob Patterson
RODEO QUEEN: Krystal Burrows SPECIALTY ACT: Jim Bob Feller

101 Wild West Rodeo Begins in August

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making its sixth four-night run in Ponca City, after many years of three-night performances during the 101 Ranch.
Rodeo.

 

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be August 14-17, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

 

The 2002 Rodeo will mark the 43rd running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

 

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

 

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

 

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George Joe and Zack.

 

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

 

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

 

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven and the press box have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

 

The 2002 rodeo will attempt to bring "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

 

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, that have included calf scramble, boot race, and other activities. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, in his first year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one-act exhibitions for the four-night stand. Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president; Darleanna Warnecke as secretary and Robin Carpenter as treasurer.

 

Kevin Rich and Donald Shepard will return as bull fighters and Dr. Lynn Phillips, popular announcer from Enid will return. Jim Bob Feller of Grandbury, Texas, will be bringing a specialty act and act as barrelman for the rodeo.

 

Clown acts may include Country Star Search, trained mule Honkey, trained miniature Brahma, Carl the Wonder Mule, Wild Canadian Hog, Bucking Ford, Ingrown Hare, Golf Act, Camera Act and the ultimate lady, Georgina Louskey.

 

Rafter H Rodeo Company of Dell Hall, Tahlequah, will again produce the rodeo, as it has the past few years.

 

Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena bucking chutes where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes.

 

Many special events happen during "rodeo week." They include an exciting parade in downtown Ponca City along Grand Avenue at 10 a.m., the excitement of 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contestant activities; with the official naming of the queen during the final performance on Saturday night, and special nights for barbecue and dances. Vendors also make the rodeo arena grounds a small mall.

101 Wild West Rodeo Primed For Opener

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making its sixth four-night run in Ponca City, after many years of three-night. performances during the 101 Ranch Rodeo.

 

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be August 14-17, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly.

 

Rafter H Rodeo Company of Dell Hall, Tahlequah, will again produce the rodeo, as it has the past few years.

 

There will be a Tuesday preview of things to come, when the producer, Rafter H Rodeo puts on the "slack" performance. That will include steer roping, which is not on the regular program, along with first go-rounds of steer wrestling, calf roping and team roping. It will begin around 4:30 p.m. at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena, and as in previous  years, may run until midnight or after.

 

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

 

The 2002 Rodeo will mark the 43rd running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the. birthplace of rodeo - the once mighty 101 Ranch.

History of the 101 Ranch


The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year I history both rich and tragic, influenced  Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of I the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of I acres of land which Miller both leased I and purchased from his friends the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

 

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

 

Celebration Brought Rodeo Back
But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a Rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The  present bleachers and chutes were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven and the press box have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

 

The 2002 rodeo will attempt to bring "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three-state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

 

Goodno Heads Foundation
There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, that have included calf scramble, boot race, and other activities. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, in his first year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one-act exhibitions for the four-night stand. Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president; Darleanna Warnecke as secretary and Robin Carpenter as treasurer.

Kevin Rich and Donald Shepherd will return as bull fighters and Dr. Lynn Phillips, popular announcer from Enid will return. Jim Bob Feller of Grandbury, Texas, will be bringing a specialty act and act as barrelman for the rodeo.

 

Clown acts may include Country Star Search, trained mule Honkey, trained miniature Brahma, Carl the Wonder Mule, Wild Canadian Hog, Bucking Ford, Ingrown Hare, Golf Act, Camera Act and the ultimate lady, Georgina Louskey.

 

Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena bucking chutes where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes.


Many special events happen during "rodeo week." They include an exciting parade in downtown Ponca City along Grand Avenue at 10 a.m., the excitement of 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contestant activities, with the official naming of the queen during the .final performance on Saturday night, and special nights for barbecue and dances. Vendors also make the rodeo arena grounds a small mall.

Barrelmen Provide Laughs During Rodeo Performance

The fellow in the barrel during the bull riding events of the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be 51-year-old Jim Bob Feller of Granbury, Texas.

 

Feller will be bringing other specialty acts to the arena also and in 2001 was nominated for the PRCA Clown of the Year.

 

Among the acts, Feller will include in his appearances, are Country Star Search; Honkey, trained mule; Trained Miniature Brahma; Carl, the Wonder Mule;
Wild Canadian Hog; Georgina Louskey, the ultimate lady, and other fill-ins; Bucking Ford; Ingrown Hare; Golf Act and Camera Act.

 

The son of a Methodist minister, Feller grew up a "city boy" but began riding and fighting bulls at the age of 16. He fought bulls for 17 years and attended Weatherford College, University of Texas Arlington and has been a PRCA member since 1970.

 

Feller has been married for 30 years and he and wife Donna have two adult youngsters, daughter, Tami, 28 and son, J.D., 21.

 

He has been in the Wrangler Bull. fight Finals in 1991, 1998 and 1999 . and was barrelman at the National Finals Rodeo.

 

Feller will be joined in the arena during the bull riding events by two other well-known bullfighters and clowns, Kevin Rich and Donald Shepherd.

 

Rich has been a mainstay with the 101 Wild West Rodeo for several years, The Windsor, Colo., resident was born in Bucklin, Kan., and received a bachelor's degree in agricultural business from Fort Hays State College in Hays, Kan., and also attended Colorado State University at Fort Collins.

 

Rich owns a tack and Western store and includes golf, gambling and basketball as other special interests. He has been a member of the PRCA since 1988 and in the Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo from 1989-93.

 

Shepherd, of Springdale, Ark., was the Bull-A-Thon champion in 1993. He was in the Missouri High School Finals 1993-97 and CPRA finals bullfighter in 1995.

 

Shepherd counts rodeo as his lone special interest, although he maintains a construction job during his off-time from the arena. His~ PRCA membership dates back to 1996.

Rafter H Stock For '101'

For the past several years, the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation has contracted with Dell Hall of Hulbert, Okla., as the stock contractor and producer ofthe 101 Wild West Rodeo.

 

Hall and his Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company bring a lot of accolades to the 101 Wild West Rodeo, or any that he produces. Hall goes back a few years, and has been in the stock contracting business for the past 37 years, the last 24 as a member of the PRCA.

 

And you can look forward to seeing some of the best stock, since he has had recent stock at the National Finals Rodeo a year ago. Take for instance, the 2001 NFR included such bareback broncs as Big Canyon, Festus, Wild Flower and Dollar from the Rafter H Rodeo Stock. Also in saddle bronc, Tough Woman and in bulls, Gladiator.

 

Rafter H Rodeo is a family-run operation on a 1,420 ranch 10 miles outside Tahlequah. Hall's wife, Betty, is a PRCA timer, while daughter Shelley, is a PRCA secretary, and son Justin, helps out with the sorting and flanking of the livestock.

 

As a former contestant in both riding and timed events, Hall knows that the stock can draw either make or break a contestant. Hall raises several of his bucking horses and bulls, but still makes two or three buying trips a year for stock.

'101' Grand Marshall Is News City Editor

Bob Patterson, city editor for The Ponca City News, has been named Grand Marshal for the 2002 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade scheduled for Saturday, August 17,2002.

 

He has covered rodeo events for many years in Kansas and Oklahoma. Originally from El Dorado, Kan., Patterson served with the United States Army in the Continental Army Command Band.

 

He was sports editor for The Traveler in Arkansas City until June 1977 when he accepted a similar position with the Abilene Reflector-Chronicle in Kansas.

 

He became Managing Editor of the Abilene newspaper in 1979. It was in Abilene when Patterson began covering rodeo events, at the Wild Bill Hickok Rodeo, the first part of a six-day Central Kansas Free Fair of Dickinson County in Abilene.

 

Patterson and wife Sue, moved to Ponca City in 1989 where he was a news reporter for The Ponca City News. He has served the last few years as The News City Editor. The couple has two children, Pamela Worcester and family in Altus, and Jerald Patterson and family in Hammonds Plains, Nova Scotia, Canada.

 

Patterson said, "I am extremely honored the Rodeo Foundation made their surprise selection and will be very pleased to do whatever it takes to help make the 101 Wild West Rodeo successful. The foundation, without a doubt, has a very long-standing record of successful rodeo engagements and I look forward to many more years of being able to attend the rodeo."

Stacie Schneeberger Took 101 Queen Honors in 2001

Stacie Schneeberger is the 19-year-old daughter of Dennis and Brenda Schneeberger. She recently graduated from Northern Oklahoma College and Pioneer Technology Center, with a degree in Respiratory Care. She currently is working at the Via Christi of Northern Oklahoma Medical Center in Ponca City and plans to specialize in neonatal care. She is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and the National Vocational Technical Honor Society.

 

Stacie grew in the rodeo way of life and is honored to have the opportunity to promote the sport. She competed in goat tying and breakaway roping for several years before entering her first pageant two years ago. "I have come a long ways," she states, "and have learned so much that will help me later on in my life."

 

Stacie has enjoyed her reign as Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen - 2001, because she says "It gives me the chance to promote and represent something I Love. I strongly believe in the sport of rodeo not only because it's a part of our western heritage but because of how family involved it is."

 

Stacie has done several things throughout the community since winning her title. She has participated in McCord Schools Reading Month by reading her favorite childhood book to the entire school, including the Pre-K class. She talked to the children on the importance of knowing how to read and how it has helped her. Stacie also gave a talk to the Kay County 4-H Equine Club about setting goals. She believes that setting a goal for yourself is the key to success. Without having goals, Stacie says she would not be where she is today.

 

Stacie was awarded first runner up and Miss Congeniality of the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Pageant held in October in Tulsa. She represented the 101 Wild West Rodeo. The pageant was hosted by the Oklahoma Rodeo Pageants Council Inc. at the Doubletree Hotel and the Tulsa State Fair. The Pageant consisted of two rounds of horsemanship, two rounds of modeling, intensive interviews, a speech, a written test of rodeo knowledge, and impromptu questions. For the speech competition, Stacie gave hers on her hometown Ponca City. "It was a great experience. I met new friends and learned a lot to help me prepare for next year!"

 

"I want to thank Ponca City for allowing me to represent my hometown at the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Scholarship Pageant. It was truly an honor. I could not have come as far as I did without the help of all my sponsors and I appreciate everything they did for me," Schneeberger said.

Third Annual Kid's Rodeo At The Library

This year's Kids' Rodeo is going to be bigger and better than ever, thanks to the generous support of the citizens of Ponca City, said Tammy Denny, administrative assistant of the Ponca City Library.

 

"Local support for the Kids' Rodeo has more than tripled over the last couple of years, and has actually been overwhelming at times," she said.

 

"Corporate sponsors, businesses, organizations and even individuals have all shown their generosity and support for the program.

 

"These sponsors have contributed everything from drinks to great prizes such as free movie passes, coin banks, free burgers, and even $25 savings bonds."

 

If you would like to donate something for the rodeo, call Mary at 767-0345.

 

This "youth-oriented, full-filled event" is set for Saturday, Aug. 17, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the front lawn of the library. It will take place following the 101 Rodeo Parade.

 

"All you cowboys and cowgirls come on out to the library for a rootin' tootin' good time at the Third Annual Kids' Rodeo," said Denny. "If you would like to be a rodeo star for the day, come and enjoy the fun. There will be free munchies and a whole lot of prizes."

 

Several new activities have been added since last year's event. Events include:

Musical Hay Bales
Goat-tail tying
Steer roping
Stick-horse racing
Horse rides
Pony rides
A tattoo and headband parlor
Free food and drinks
Junior Clown Contest - with free professional face painting
Inside activities include:
 
Indent-A-Kid (sponsored by the Ponca City Police Department)
Dave May's Magic Rodeo  Showdeo - 11 a.m. until noon
Tommy Puffinbarger, Rodeo Clown Show - 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Denny said that "community support has just been incredible I would like to thank everyone for their help in making this year's Kids' Rodeo the best one yet" For more information, contact Janel or Tammy at 767-0345.

PRCA Came From Colorful Beginning

Rodeo is a far cry from the 19th century when the sport was in its infancy. Back then, the first riding and roping contests probably were impromptu affairs, perhaps the result of chance meetings on trails and at rail heads. Ranch outfits often would get together and match their best hands in exhibitions of skill.

 

Those get-togethers grew into loosely organized contests that soon became anticipated annual events. On a day whose date might be argued forever, rodeo, the only professional sport derived from the sills of the workplace, was born.

 

Though popular as it was colorful, rodeo lacked organization until the'1920s, when the Rodeo Association of America named its first annual champions. The association was composed of rodeo committees and promoters from throughout North America.

 

The first lasting organizational effort, though, didn't take place until 1936, when contestants rebelled against promoters and demanded fair prize money, consistency in judging, and honest advertising of their sport.

 

The contestants called their group the Cowboys' Turtle Association because they were slow to act, but had finally struck out their necks for their cause.

 

The name endured until 1945 when the group became the Rodeo Cowboys Association. In 1975, the organization changed its name to the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. The PRCA moved into its permanent home in Colorado Springs, Colo., in 1979.

'101' Competition Attracts Top-Notch Horewomen

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen.

 

Our queen's competition offers a wealth of gifts and prizes, including a handmade, hand tooled queen's saddle valued well over $1,200.

 

The Rodeo Foundation thanks Steve and Terry Huston of Trout Funeral Home for continuing the tradition of donating this beautiful saddle. Numerous Ponca City merchants have donated awards and gifts for the queen, horsemanship and runner-up winners.

 

Ponca Tribal Member Rosetta LeClair has hand-beaded a traveling tiara and sash for our queen, keeping the Native American influence a part of the 101 Heritage.

 

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

 

The contestants are judged 40% on horsemanship, 30% on public speaking, 15% each on appearance and personality. The coronation will be during Saturday's performance.

Queen Contestant Schedule Tough To Keep

Becoming 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen 2002 will take some doing according to the schedule they have to keep during three days of competition beginning Thursday.

 

Activity opens with orientation at Hero's by the Holiday Inn at 4 p.m. Thursday, including introductions', discussion of rules and going over the rodeo schedule.

 

The queens will ride to the rodeo together at 6:30 p.m. and then they will be preparing for the Grand Entry, on their horses at 7:15 p.m. ahead of the Grand Entry in which they will be posts for the event, introduced following the first event and carry flags between events.

 

Friday's schedule begins at 11 a.m., as they ride together or caravan for lunch at the Conoco cafeteria. That's where they will model their outfits, and give speeches, followed by impromptu questioning.

 

There will then be an interview at 1:30 p.m. in the conference room of Holiday Inn, which a combination of personality and rodeo knowledge and current events.

 

Horsemanship at the Busy Bee Arena will be at 5 p.m. That's where the queen contestants will ride one pattern, selected shortly before the competition. It includes a set pattern, dismount, answering of questions by the judges and making a queen run.

 

At 7:15 p.m., it's rodeo time again and similar to the Thursday performance, for the Grand Entry, posts, introductions after the first event and carrying flags between events.

 

Saturday opens with the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade. Contestants are to be at the church parking lot on West Grand by 9:30 a.m. A vote on Miss Congeniality will be taken, and following the parade contestants will attend the Children's Rodeo and help out at some of the booths, providing the contestants a great chance to relax and have fun with the kids. Following the Children's Rodeo, contestants will be split up to go to Davis Moore and Corral West to sign autographs.

 

Contestants will be on their horses and ready to go at the rodeo grounds at 7:15 p.m. for the Grand Entry, continue to be posts for the event and then Coronation. The Coronation will take place after the first event.

Cowboys Slog Through Mud In Preliminary Competition

Rodeo fans should have quite a fun time the rest of the week as they watch the 101 Wild West Rodeo performers at the four 8 p.m. events in the 101 Ranch arena.

 

Staunch rodeo fans that were in attendance Tuesday weren't disappointed too much, although the rain that fell earlier in the day and then just prior to the 4 p.m. start, forced officials of the Rafter H rodeo producers to consider postponing the slack events.

 

It would have been a tough situation for everybody involved, since there were 44 steer ropers entered and expecting to get two full rounds of that event in, plus a total of 52-steer wrestlers, 32 calf ropers and 21 teams in the team roping. They had paid their full entry fees, and to either postpone or cancel would have been quite a strain, both to the producer-and participants.

 

However, in the final say-so, the producers went ahead and activity got under way about 45 minutes later than expected. But slack finished in good time, as the final team ropers took a "no time" for their efforts and everybody went on their way participants much muddier than when they arrived, and fans a bit damp if there while the rain was falling.

 

Steer ropers, who were first to try the heavy arena floor, found the going very tough in their first go-round. There were only eight to get the job done, roping and tying, within the 25-second limit. It was tough to get enough speed out of their mounts, and then dismount and keep good enough footing, to get to the steer. That's where some of the real work began, when mud-slickened legs of the steer made it hard to keep a good grip during the tie.

 

Best in the first "go" was Jim Davis, former Ponca Citian, who now calls Abilene, Texas, home, getting the job done in 14 seconds-flat. His efforts paid off after the evening with a $923.60 payoff in the first go, and he tucked another $764.35 into his pocket with a 30.3 on two, just four-tenths of a second shy of the 29.9 that Jim Folk was able to come up with on two. Folk had fourth money in the first go, at 15.3 and then put more into his pocket on a 14.6 in the second. The 29.9, and two go payoffs, amounted to a total of $1,449.09.

 

Jay Sellers was the second "go" winner with a 12.0 clocking, and then Kim Ziegelgruber with a 12.6 followed by Brad Mohon 13.6 and Guy Allen, the world champion, 13.8 just ahead of Grady Potter of Arkansas City at 13.9 and Folk and Buster Record Jr., who were at 14.6.

 

Davis, with his 14.0 in the first go, led Chet Herron, 14.6; Tyler Mayse, 15.2; Folk, 15.3; Ralph Williams, 16.7 and Rod Hartness, 17.7.

 

There were two sections of first "go" steer wrestlers, and they ended up in the mud for the most part, simply because of the way they have to turn that steer over once they dismount with their catch in their hands and arms. Teddy Johnson had the best time of 4.5 in the first group, just ahead of Jeff Babek at 4.6.

 

After some calf roping and team roping, the other section of steer wrestlers took to the arena and Tom Duvall got a 4.2 and Dale Yerigan had a 4.4 - but they were not good enough as the final steer wrestler to get the-job-done correctly, quickly, was Shane Crawford with a 4.0. That earned him $965.79 in the first "go" and Duvall had $799.27 for second, with Yerigan third at $632.76.

 

Justin Smith and Johnson shared fourth-fifth, and got $382.98 apiece while Babek pocketed $166.51.

 

Calf roping was also a bit slow for the most part. Similar to the steer ropers, the going was heavy. Chris Neal however was able to do it in less than 10 seconds posting a 9.2 for $963.53 in the first "go." All calf ropers will have a second shot at the money during their second "go" performances the four regular nights of the rodeo, as do steer wrestlers and team ropers.

 

Bill Huber was second with 10.8 for $722.64 and C.R. Bradley had a 19.9 for $481.76. Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger, who is currently listed sixth in the national standings, had a 13.0 for $240.88.

 

The team of Justin Turner and Jake Long had a 7.2. They were the second team to leave the box looking for the "header" catch and the "heeler" finish. Next came Shannon Lee and C.R. Bradley with 8.6 and then Danny Houser-Ralph Williams at 9.2. There will be four payoffs in the team roping "go" efforts, plus the average.

Solid Performances Posted As Rodeo Gets Under Way

High scores in the rough stock events and quick times otherwise provided rodeo fans of the 101 Wild West Rodeo several thrills Wednesday during the opening night of the 43rd annual event.

 

The Rafter H stock of Dell Hall certainly gave indications also that there were going to be some quick dump-offs in the rough stock events while calves and steers made it equally difficult for timed event performers.

 

With the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena still a bit heavy from Tuesday's rainfall, arena personnel from the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Larry Goodno have to be given a "pat on the back" for getting it into competitive shape. Well done!

From the very first event, bareback riding, to the final event, bull riding, fans were treated to some really good scores.

 

Take for instance, the pair of 75s on the first two bareback broncs posted by Lundy Weeks of Macksburg, Iowa and Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas. Weeks drew Rafter H's Indian Paint while Cannon rode City Limits. Doing almost as well was Luiz Carlos Moreira of Fort Worth on Good Buddy.

 

However, Nick Sellers of Choctaw had to ride twice in the event. Dakota Sunrise stumbled on the first buck out of the chute and had a lot of the crowd, and .rodeo officials as well, holding a breath for a second before quick hands ofthe producers freed the fallen horse and rider and both were able to scamper off the arena floor. Sellers got a re-ride later in the program, but was unable to stay on his second bronc.

Not to be outdone after watching those 75s, Clay Wilson of Stillwater posted an 80 on True Grit in the saddle bronc riding and that will be a pretty good score for the cowboys to shoot at in that event.

 

And, in bull riding, Patrick Helgerson of Sanger, Texas, rode B Killer B for a 77.

The girls barrel racers were a bit slower as a result of the slightly heavy footing, but the fans I cheered them to relatively good times. Rae Lynn" Olson of Altoona, Kan., bad a 19.07 and Sandy McElreath of Cimarron, Kan., had a 20.59. 

 

Steer wrestlers weren't as successful in the ~ arena as the night before, but Justin Nokes of McCook, Neb., got his down in 4.3 for the best in the second "go" and that may be tough to beat. Tops in the first "go" on Monday was a 4.0 by Shane Crawford, who will return to the arena later in the week.

 

Todd Butcher of Winfield, Kan., had a 7.1 to go with his 5.1 in the first "go" and that set him in command for the average with a 12.2. The only other to get into the average on Wednesday, was Brady Burnham, Burwell, Neb., who had a 4.2 plus 10 for leaving the box too quickly to go with a 15.1 for a total of 29.3.

 

In calf roping, Kolby Ungeheuer of Columbus, Kan., had a 9.0 for the best so far in the second I "go." Heath Humble of Cherokee, Kan., had a 10.2. j Both had no time in Tuesday's slack.

 

Jeff Miller of Blue Mound, Kan., put a 13.6 with I his Tuesday time of 13.1 to take the average lead at 26.7, followed by the 15.8 on Wednesday by Craig Marsolf of Amorita, Okla., who had 13.5 on Tuesday to make it 29.3 on "two."

 

Team ropers were headed by Nick Sartain of Yukon, Okla., and Shannon Frascht, Alva, who got the job done in 5.7 along with their 12.7 on Tuesday put them into the average at 18.4 on two.

 

Danny Houser of Copan and Ralph Williams of Skiatook had just a bit of hard luck, with heeler Williams catching just one hind leg and it cost them five seconds, to a 13.4. That went with Tuesday's 9.2 and a 22.6 in the average.


Local team ropers, who are looking for eight spots in the Saturday finals of the 101 Beverage sponsored event, had rough going. Best were Derry Owen and Paul Mayse who had a 9.7. Wednesday night's other team to make the catches were Ladd Oldfield/Justin Tague, with a 16.3 following a five-second penalty for only one hind leg caught.

 

Other saddle bronc riders to make the eight-second ride on I Wednesday were Travis Sturdy, I Palmyra, Neb., on Black Magic for a 70; Justin Howard of Hennessey getting a 65 on Cotton Candy; and I Clayton Zibell of Wann with a 52 on Baldy Bill.

 

Following Helgerson in the bull riding were Layne McCasland, Wheeler, Texas, with a 75 on Night Train and Steve Washington, Okmulgee, who had a 75 on Big John. Jeff Boudreau of Durant I and Justin Jacobucci of Brightson, Colo., were unable to stay on Flash Back and Dirty Dozen respectively.

 

The rodeo continues through Saturday, with each performance starting with the Grand Entry at 8 p.m.

 

Special events later in the week include the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade along Grand Avenue at 10 a.m. Saturday followed immediately by the Kids Rodeo on the grounds of the Ponca City Library at approximately 11 a.m.

Cowboy Keeps Trying Until He Gets Full Ride

What makes a man want to keep trying, when two efforts to get a bucking horse out of the chute fails?

 

Zach Dishman of Beaumont, Texas, may have had the answer. He wanted to show how well he could ride. And that's just exactly what happened Thursday night at the 101 Wild West Rodeo in the bareback event.

 

Dishman may have said "it's going to be one of those nights," when it took a re-ride decision and ,then a second-one prior to his thrilling the crowd by conquering the bucking efforts on Bay Rum in the bareback event.

 

All Dishman did was follow the opening ride of Payne Dobler, Andover, Kan., who had a 76 on Rafter H's Big Country. That was better than two 75s recorded the first night of the rodeo on Wednesday, and Dishman had to prove he could do better.

 

He did. Boy, did he do it. Here's how. His first mount, Lucky Star just wouldn't leave the chute. So a re-ride was ordered. That came on the first mount out during the saddle bronc event, but Dishman's luck was no better than the regular time for the event. Another re-ride ordered. Bay Rum was placed in the chute after all the saddle bronc riders had shown off, and Dishman and Bay Rum showed what was going to be a big trip. Dishman spurred, Bay Rum bucked, and the Judges said ,"that's an 83!" in the end. That put Dishman clearly on top heading to tonight's and Saturday's 8 p.m. performances.

 

Now if that didn't thrill the crowd, those that made it to the final ride of the night certainly got their money's worth, when Grant Wells of Queensland, Australia, rode Rafter H's SMKLS Gun for an 84.

 

That put him firmly on top as Wednesday's best was a 77 by Patrick Helgerson of Sanger, Texas. None of the other three Thursday night bull riders, Lonnie Carpenter of Wichita, Kerry Castle, Crawford, Okla., and Blaine D. Whipp of Marion, Ark., were able to stay on the Rafter H stock of Dell Hall.

 

And one barrel racer Gretchen Benbenek of Missoula, Mont., dipped under the 18-second barrier with a 17.95 when she completed her clover-leaf run.
Two others had gone below the 19-second heavy footing best of Wednesday dining the next-to-last event Thursday prior to Benbenek's ride.

 

They were Kasey Etbauer of Goodwell, clocked at 18.09 and then Kate Rumford of Abbyville, Kan., with an 18.78. ' Saddle bronc riders had it a little tougher Thursday.

 

Best turned in was a 74 on Brown Jug by Justin R. Washburn, Corona, N.M. But that didn't out do Wednesday's 80 by Clay Wilson, Stillwater, on True Grit. Other Thursday rides included a 68 by Joel Picou, Beaumont, Texas, on Cotton Candy and the best Billy Etbauer of Ree Heights, S.D., could do was 64 on Spring Fling.

 

The crowd was thrilled by the hoop dancing of 6-year-old Dalton Stout right after the opening event. The youngster had performed on Wednesday in the heavy footing, but the Thursday show was even better.

 

And Jim Bob Feller proved to be exceptional as the clown act, who had assistance from bullfighters Kevin Rich and Donald Shepherd.

 

Steer wrestlers came up with some new leaders when Weatherford's Daniel Adams had a 4.5 to go with his slack of 6.3 to register 10.8 on the average.
That's better than the 12.2 of Todd Butcher, Winfield, Kan., who had his second "go" on Wednesday.

 

Other good times in steer wrestling were missing on Thursday, but the efforts were not. Ricky Riley of Tahlequah had a 4.1 that turned into a 14.1 when he was caught leaving the box just a bit too early. Mark Blackwell of Checotah also had a 4.3 but that went to 14.3 for the same reason, and Stan Mauldin of Copan saw his 4.2 go to 14.2 also.

 

Calf ropers have made the average interesting now that the footing is better on the 101 Ranch arena floor. C.R. Bradley of Sperry had an 8.5 and that pushed the time down in the average to a 21.4 mark, when he put it with the slack "go" of 12.9.

 

Chris Neal of Muldrow, who went in at 9.2 had a 13.4 for a 22.6 and a second effort by Tyler Mayse of Ponca City for a 9.2 to go with a 14,0 first "go" put him at 23.2.

 

The Wednesday team roping leaders of Nick Sartain, Yukon, and Shannon Frascht of Alva with 18.4 in the average remained on top Of that event. Thursday's roping effort of Shannon Lee, Gotebo and Bradley got close and would have had the lead had it not been for the heeler Bradley just getting one leg in the loop. They had an 8.6 in the slack on Tuesday and the 5.2 would have made it 13.8, but they had to settle for an 18.8 on the 5-second penalty.

 

Three local team ropers look towards Saturday's finals from their Thursday efforts. Tom Nichols/Red Nichols had a 9.9 for the best of the night. John Oxford/Mark Sullin had a 14.5 and Fred Tillman/Leroy Tillman had 9.8, plus 5 for 14.8. They join two other teams that hope their times will get them to the eight-team finals on Saturday, including the 9.7 of Derry Owen/Paul Mayse and the 16.3 of Ladd Oldfield/Justin Tague.

 

The rodeo does continue through Saturday night, with performances at 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday. There's the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade to open activity on Saturday at 10 a.m., when activity runs from Oak Street on West Grand Avenue, east to Seventh Street. And the Kids Rodeo will be at the Ponca City Library right after that, at approximately 11 a.m.

Saturday's Rainfall Causes Minor Problems For Rodeo Contestants

Saturday night's activity at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena found fans cheering for their favorite queen candidate, and contestants of the 101 Wild West Rodeo as well.

Five queen candidates had been presented during the first three nights of the rodeo, including Laura Sentel, Tahnee Marie Harjo, Krystal Burrows, Kristy Lynn Whetstone and Angela Adelle Tipton.

 

Saturday morning's 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade went through Grand Avenue with pleasant weather greeting a good handwaving and cheering crowd.

 

The day cooled down somewhat an hour after the parade, and a big thunderstorm put a damper on things at the rodeo grounds. However, cowboys and cowgirls were preparing to continue their efforts towards picking up some of those checks from Rafter H secretary Shelley Hall by the end of the night.

 

Friday night's performers were at both ends of their best efforts. Some not what they wanted, and others with some really good ones.

 

Take for instance in the girls barrel racing. The more 'solid arena footing helped out. as four contestants were allowed to keep their times of under 18 seconds as new leaders. One other contestant however, dipped under 17 seconds only to squeeze too close to the final barrel and it cost her. Jeanne Anderson of White City, Kan., had a 16.94, but was assessed a five second penalty and had to settle for 21.94, probably out of the money.

 

Those four under 18 seconds included new leader Kim Squires of Carnegie, at 17.13. Now, after the rain, that will be tough to beat. Deantha Melton of Oklahoma City had a 17.25 and sits second, while Toni Cummings, Pleasant Hill, Mo., had 17.54 and Karen L. Mussyal, Luther, who got things rolling Friday, with a 17.70. Those were all under the best of Thursday, when Gretchen Benbenek of Missoula, Mont., recorded a 17.95.

 

Saddle bronc riders put on quite a show for the Friday fans. Zac Farrington, Topeka, Kan., pushed into third place with a 72 on True Grit as the first contestant. But that was bettered when Matt D. Reed of El Dorado, Kim., got a 76 on Saddle Bags and jumped into second place. Then both were dropped in the standings on the final ride, a 79, by Jet McCoy of Weatherford, on Brown Jug. Tops at the start of the Saturday performances was an 80 by Clay Wilson of Stillwater.

 

Bareback riders were missing from the scene Friday, with the exception of McCoy. He had a no score on his mount and it was announced by Dr. Lynn Phillips, 101 Wild West Rodeo announcer, that three of the rodeo contestants traveling together during the day had been involved in an accident. Details were lacking as to seriousness.

 

Steer wrestlers also liked the better footing, as Bart Bailey of Okmulgee provided an early score of 3.7 and that put him in the top position for the second "go." Bailey had a no time in the slack on Tuesday. That was the history of Cody Browne of Wilburton, who also had a3.8 second "go." The two times were by far (tenths of a second) the best for the rodeo in the event.

 

Best at the average however is held/by Shane Crawford of Henryetta, who had a 4.0 in the. slack on Tuesday and then got a 4.8 Friday to make it 8.8. Teddy Johnson put a 6.5 Friday with his slack of 4.5 to post an 11.0 in the average, and Roger Anderson of Kenai, Alaska, duplicated a 5.6 for a total of 11.2.

 

Two others were able to get close to the money in the second "go" as John Kloeckler of Checotah had a 4.2 and Ricky Huddleston of McAlester had 4.5. Kloeckler had a no time in slack and Huddleston had been penalized for leaving the box too soon that night.

 

Bailey also did the trick in the calf roping. The Okmulgee cowboy had a 9.2 and that put him in fourth.

 

Justin Turner of Quapaw and Jake Long of South Coffeyville put a 19.9 on the average with a 12.7 on Friday in team roping. That's third at the present time.
In the local team roping event for the saddles from sponsor 101 Beverage, two other teams made it to the Saturday running, with catches by both header and heeler. Stan Broyles/David Belair had a 16.2 and Scott Burries/Ted McKee bettered that on the final steer, with a 14.9.

 

Bull riders were unsuccessful in riding but fans were treated twice during the event, when bullfighters Donald Shepherd and Kevin Rich, toyed with turned out bulls.

Rodeo Performers Thrill Crowd On Last Night Of Exciting Week

Obviously the best crowd of the 2002 101 Wild West Rodeo Saturday witnessed the crowning of Krystal Burrows of Claremore as queen and got some terrific efforts from participants.

 

Burrows was presented a new saddle by Steve and Terry Huston of Trout Funeral Home and a number of other special gifts. Stacie Schneeberger, relinquished her title of the past year as 101 Wild West Rodeo queen. Assisting with the coronation was Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Dana Drummond of Keota.

 

After a week that started off with heavy rain making things quite muddy in the arena Tuesday, participants warmed up with their efforts throughout the week and came on strong.

 

What may have been the best, or most competitive event, at least was the girls barrel racing. Saturday, the crowd cheered two Springer girl barrel racers to a No.1 and No.2 finish and there was only .02 of a second between the two.

 

Kim Thomas rode the clover-leaf pattern in 17.09 that put her on top of the four-night performers as the second rider in the event on Saturday but had to settle for second place just seconds later, when Michelle Noterman did the trick in 17.07. Noterman wound up with $843.45 and Thomas $733.44 as the first two in the money. They bettered Kim Squires, of Oklahoma City, who on Friday, had rode to a 17.13. Squires got $623.42.

 

Two other Saturday girl barrel racers, Missi Henderson of Winfield, Kan.,  had a 17.15 and Shannon Kerr-Wilson, Stillwater, 17.67 to finish in the money, which was awarded through the 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation producer Dell Hall of Rafter H, Tahlequah.

 

Another glossy effort was turned in by local team-ropers Tom Nichols and Red Nichols as the joined other finalists in the event. All the Nichols pair did was show the professionals how to do right and faster. The two had a 9.9 on Friday earlier to qualify, and then did it in 7.7 Saturday for a 17.6. That won them each a saddle from 101 Beverage, sponsors of the event. Presentation was made by Nick Jeffries, Stan Sheid and Jerry Wheeler right after the event.

 

Drew Parker of Denton, Texas, moved into the money at a fourth place tie of the bull riding when he scored a 74 Saturday night on Midnight Special of the Rafter H stock. Winner was Grant Wells of Queensland, Australia, who had a ride of 84 on Thursday.

Wes Bailey of Tampa, Kan., made it to the fourth place spot in the saddle bronc event when he had a 75 on True Grit. The event winner was Clay Wilson of Stillwater, who scored 80 on Wednesday.

 

Tops in bareback for the week went to Zach Dishman of Bellmont, Texas, who had an 83.

 

Ponca Citian Jerome Schneeberger continued to thrill the crowd with his calf roping prowess. The National Finals Rodeo contestant had a 10.7 on Saturday to go with a first "go" of 13.0. to finish fourth in the average at 23.7. Schneeberger continues to be one of the top 10 and currently standing sixth in the running towards the NFR that will come up later in the year in Las Vegas.

 

Winner of the calf roping average was C.R. Bradley of Sperry, who had a 21.4 and he took the second "go" as well with an 8.5 and was third in the first "go" with a 12.9.

 

A pair of steer wrestlers provided very quick times, including Marvel Rogers of Del City, with 4.2 and Walt Sherry, Holdenville, with a 5.1. Rogers had a 5.0 earlier to post a 9.2 in, the average, and that earned him fourth money and tie for fourth money in the "go." Sherry finished fifth in the average.


Team ropers were unable to get any catches for times, some unable get the job done as header, and others ,losing out when the heeler missed. Tops for the rodeo went to Nick Sartain of Yukon and Shannon Frascht, Alva, who had a 5.7 on Wednesday' and that gave them 16.4, according, to the official records of rodeo secretary Shelley Hall.


LOCAL TEAM ROPERS Tom Nichols, second from left and Red Nichols, second from right, display the saddles won Saturday night at the 101 Wild West Rodeo from sponsors 101 Beverage. The Nichols pair, from Ponca City, had a 9.9 on Thursday and came back in the finals with a 7.7 to 'post a 17.6, thus claiming the saddles. 101 Beverage personnel included at left, Stan Sheid; in the truck bed, Jerry Wheeler; and right, Nick Jeffries.

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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