2004

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

Website will be updated as information becomes available.

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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NEW THIS YEAR: Pony Express Relay Race

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2004

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 19th, 20th, & 21st

   
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: The Ponca City Great Race Team - Explorer Post 69
RODEO QUEEN: Kimber Craighead SPECIALTY ACT: Brian Hope - The Rodeo Comedian

101 Wild West Rodeo Will Have Three Performances


The 45th annual rodeo performances have been scheduled for August 19-21.

After several years of running a four-night performance rodeo, the foundation voted this year to return to a three-night performance with Wednesday reserved for rodeo slack.

Foundation members, along with numerous volunteers, will start fine-tuning the appearance of the arena for the annual 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Although the grounds are maintained year round and host other activities, the arena itself is preserved for rodeo. Preparing for a rodeo of this size takes full cooperation of the 16-member committee along with any volunteers they can drum up along the way.

Mowing, spraying, dirt work and trash pick up are just a start to the countless man-hours put in to gear up for performances.

Last minute details include painting, cleaning, and seat board replacement.

As show time nears Ponca City residents will start to see the lights in the arena on more often and longer each night.

Extra help is always appreciated and anyone interested in lending a hand is never turned away.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Larry Goodno, meets monthly all year long and welcomes the public to attend.

Other foundation officers include Darrel Dye as vice president, Darleanna Warnecke as secretary and Raye Lynne Brown as treasurer.

Anyone interested in contacting the Rodeo Foundation for meeting, volunteering, and other information may do so by calling 580-716-1057 or by visiting the 101 Rodeo Website at www.101wildwestrodeo.com.

Rodeo Parade Entries Sought
An open invitation "to anyone that would like to participate in the fun of being in a parade" has been extended by Shannon Chambers, chairman of the 45th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo parade.

The parade will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 21 and will run from west of the railroad tracks through the Ponca City downtown area along Grand Avenue to Fifth Street.

Anyone interested in being a participant in the parade or who would like more information should contact Shannon Chambers at (580) 765-9782 or Tim Blanton at (580) 765-2482. If no answer, please leave a message.

The fifth annual Kid's rodeo will be held immediately following the main parade, at the Ponca City Library area.

The 45th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo is scheduled for Aug. 19-21.

For additional information visit www.101wildwestrodeo.com.

Rodeo Queen Contest Deadline Set July 23
The 101 Rodeo Foundation is sponsoring it's annual rodeo queen contest, which will be held Aug.19-21. It is opened to any Oklahoma female resident between the ages 13-24.

Contestants cannot be married, have ever been married, or have any children. Miss Oklahoma Rodeo guidelines will be followed. The entry deadline is July 23.

Contestants must sell $400 in rodeo tickets. Qualifying contestants will be required to provide a photo along with a biography sheet at the time of entering the contest. Judging will be based on 40 percent horsemanship, 30 percent public speaking, 15 percent appearance, and 15 percent personality. Candidates must also be prepared to represent the rodeo in the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo contest. Contestants may pay a $200 entry fee in lieu of selling rodeo tickets.

Activities for the candidates include a queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

Prizes include a Circle G barrel racing saddle and matching breast collar, Red Bluff solid sterling silver belt buckle, $300 in gas cards and a wealth of additional prizes donated by numerous local businesses and individuals.

Other prizes will be awarded to the first runner-up, horsemanship, speech, ticket sales, and Miss Congeniality.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition strives to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen. Handing down her crown is Lacey Stubblefield, also Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2004.

The queen competition has a history of queens who have gone on to winning state finals including Miss Oklahoma Rodeo and Miss Teen Rodeo.

For further information, call Linda Mauk at (580) 762-0406 and Echo Blanton at (580) 765-2482. If no answer, leave a message, or visit the Web site at www.101wildwestrodeo.com  for additional information and application.

Queen Contestant Application Deadline Changed to July 29
The deadline to enter the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contest has been extended.

The Queen Competition entry deadline is July 29. The rodeo is Aug. 19-21.

The 101 Rodeo Foundation annual rodeo queen contest is open to any Oklahoma female resident between the ages of 13 and 24. Contestants cannot be married, have ever been married, or have any children. Miss Oklahoma Rodeo guidelines will be followed.

To enter contestants must either sell $400 in rodeo tickets or pay a $200 entry fee in lieu of selling tickets. Qualifying contestants will be required to provide a publicity photo along with a biography sheet at the time of entering the contest. Judging is based on 40 percent horsemanship, 30 percent public speaking, 15 percent appearance, and 15 percent personality. Candidates must also be prepared to represent the 101 Wild West Rodeo in the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo contest.

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, parade participation, media and interview appointments, as well as appearance and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

Prizes include a Circle G barrel racing saddle and matching breast collar, a Red Bluff solid sterling silver belt buckle, $300 in ConocoPhillips gas cards and a wealth of additional prizes donated by numerous local businesses and individuals.

Other prizes will be awarded to the first runner-up, horsemanship, speech, ticket sales, and Miss Congeniality contestants.

Handing down her 101 Wild West Rodeo crown is Lacey Stubblefield, also Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2004. The Queen competition has a history of queens who have gone on to win Miss Oklahoma Rodeo and Miss Teen Rodeo.

Library Will Host Coloring, Writing Contest for Kids
As part of the Ponca City Library's fifth annual Kids Rodeo, the library is holding a kids' coloring contest and writing contest from now through Aug. 12.

The coloring contest is for kids, ages 3-10; and the story writing contest is for kids 11 and up.

Participants in both contests are required to pick up an entry form at the library. Children entering the coloring contest will find a rodeo picture on the entry form that they are asked to color, and participants in the story writing contest will use the entry form for their stories.

Entry forms for both contests must be returned to the library by Aug. 12 in order for participants to be eligible for a random drawing for a family pack of 101 Ranch Rodeo tickets or a $20 gift certificate from Corral West.

There will be two random drawings: one for each contest.

All pictures and stories will be posted in the entry way on the west end of the library until after the Kids Rodeo on Aug. 21, when they can be picked up.

Prizes for the winning random draws will be awarded Friday, Aug. 13, for both contests.

RIDERS OF THE CIMARRON, a troupe of re-enactors with Indian Territory Wild West Shows of Ponca City, will appear in the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade on Aug. 21 in downtown Ponca City. They will also be performing gunfights following the parade. Parade activities begin at 10 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo Coming Soon
Ponca City is gearing up for The 45th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo. Starting with two rounds of steer roping and rodeo slack on Wednesday, Aug. 18, regular rodeo performances will run Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 19-21 at 8 p.m. nightly. The 101 Rodeo Arena is located at the intersection of North Ash Street and West Prospect Avenue.

The official rodeo dance will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights following the performances at the Rockin' Horse Country Dance Club, north of Ponca City.

Returning to the rodeo this year and sure to provide a high level of excitement is the local Wild Cow Milking event, there will be five teams a night competing for the prize money.

Also returning to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Announcer Returns

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary. A lighted scoreboard, which was new for 2003, will give fans the latest in scorekeeping technology, helping to make this year an even more spectacular rodeo for first time spectators and veteran fans alike.

This year's rodeo, again produced by Dell Hall's Rafter H Rodeo Company of Tahlequah, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a four-night plus slack rodeo. Hall a former contestant in both riding and timed events has spent over 36 years in the stock contracting business; the last 25 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

Rough Stock Protection

Serving as Barrel man this year is Bryan Hope, The Rodeo Comedian. Bullfighters are Dusty Essick, 2001 World Championship Bullfight Finals Champion and Josh Rivinius, 2001 Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter.

Hope brings 29 years as a rodeo performer with experience including bullfighter, clown, barrel man and specialty act. He has an interactive style that holds something for everyone.

Essick has a successful career all over the nation -- including PRCA major rodeos, professional bull riding events and freestyle bullfighting competitions. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

Like Essick, Josh Rivinius has one priority É cowboy protection. Rivinius has competed in rodeo his whole life starting out in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events and finally furthering his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability; he has established himself as a premier bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry.

Bringing the specialty act for the 101 Wild West rodeo this year is Bryan Hope, The Rodeo Comedian, He offers the rodeo crowd the widest variety and some of the funniest acts east of the Mississippi. One of his notorious acts is Captain Coy's fight against crime and his new invention of the HAT CLEANER. Along with his comical props, Brian is a specialist in satisfying crowds with amusing actions and his home-town personal touch.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance. Vying for the title this year are Kimber Craighead of Mustang, Brandi Linde of Pawhuska, Laura Sentel and Ashley VanHoesen , both of Ponca City, and Tori Walton of Newkirk.

Reigning queen, Lacey Stubblefield of Enid, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have ample opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

Western Wear Emphasized

"Rodeo Week" in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. Grand Marshal this year is Ponca City's own Explorer Post 69 "Great Race" team. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at in the 500 block of East Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, hoppy horse barrel racing, mechanical bull rides, pony rides, and dummy roping are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kiddies.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year's rodeo. "Family nights" are Thursday with adults just $8 Advance, $10 Gate and kids ages 12 & under Free. Friday & Saturday performances are $8 Advance, $10 Gate and kids ages 7-12 $5 and ages 6 & under Free. Advanced tickets can be found at any grocery store in Ponca City, First National Bank of Oklahoma, Home National Bank, Pioneer Bank & Trust, Cherokee Strip Credit Union, Tractor Supply and Corral West.

Anyone wishing to get more information is welcome to call the Rodeo Foundation office at (580) 765-2980 and urged to visit our website at:  www.101ranchrodeo.com.

Wild Cow Milking Returns To 101 Wild West Rodeo
Wild Cow Milking is returning to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Aug. 19-21.

Payout -- 100 percent of Pot Paid 1st thru 4th Places minus stock charge of $20 per team. (40, 30, 20, 10) based on nightly times. In the event of a tie, a milk-off will be held on another cow & the fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

Qualifications include that the first 15 teams registering will be the only ones accepted, with the cost being $100 entry fee per team. The same three member team will be able to enter only one time. All team members will be on horseback.

Only those living within a 60 mile radius of Ponca City will be eligible, and members must be 21 years of age or older and not carrying a PRCA card or permit. Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps) are required.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 12, only at 580-765-2980 between 8 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 16 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

101 Wild West Rodeo Will Include Amateur Team Roping Event Again
The Amateur Team Roping event to be held at the 101 Wild West Rodeo is a feature that began a few years ago and is now sponsored by Kaw Nation Casino Trophy Saddles. New saddles will be awarded to the winning team on two head.

Trophy breast collars, donated by Kaw Nation Smokeshop, will be awarded to the second place team on two head.

Eight teams will participate each of the three nights of the Rodeo, Aug. 19-21, with the first callers getting their night of choice. The remaining teams will participate in slack on Wednesday night.

The top eight teams of the first two nights will be competing Saturday night in the finals.

Eligibility includes that teams entering live within a 60-mile radius of Ponca City, and be 21 years of age, or older. No PRCA Card or Permit is necessary, however attire must include Western attire, including boots, long sleeve shirt and hat (no ball caps).

In the event of a tie for the saddles, a rope-off on one head and fastest time will determine the winner following Saturday night's performance.

Entries must be phoned on Thursday, Aug. 12, only at 580-765-2980 between 7 and 9 p.m., and all entry fees and proof of age and residence is due by Monday, Aug. 16 no later than 5 p.m. at the Rodeo Office, Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, 420 East Grand Avenue.

Bar-B-Q and Hamburger Dinner Fund Raiser
A Bar-B-Q and Hamburger Dinner Fund Raiser for Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Lacey Stubblefield will be held Friday, August 20th at the Moose Lodge from 5 to 7 p.m. before the nightly 101 Wild West Rodeo.

The menu will consist of Bar-B-Q sandwiches, hamburgers with all the trimmings, baked beans, cowboy potatoes and a drink for $5 for Adults and $3 for children 9 and under, the fund raiser will help Lacey with her expenses to compete for Miss Rodeo America in Las Vegas prior to the Wrangler Nationals Finals Rodeo in December 2004.

 

 

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo Parade Set Saturday
The 101 Wild West Ranch Rodeo Parade will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, running from well west of the railroad tracks through the Ponca City downtown area along Grand Avenue.

The Grand Marshal for this year's parade is The Explorer Post 69 "Great Race" Team.

The Rodeo Parade Committee Chairman Shannon Chambers is looking for participants for this year's parade. If you are interested in being a participant in the parade or you would like more information contact Shannon Chamber (580) 765-9782 or Tim Blanton at (580) 765-2482, if no answer please leave a message.

The fifth annual Kid's rodeo will be held immediately following the main parade, at the Ponca City Library area.

Fifth Annual Kids Rodeo Set Saturday
The Ponca City Library invites "all you rootin' tootin' cowboys and cowgirls to come join the fun" at the 5th annual Kid's Rodeo at the library Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., following the rodeo parade.

Events will include:

In the street on Grand Avenue

11 a.m. - Native American dancers - sponsored by Pioneer Bank & Trust.

11:30 a.m. - Falderal Band - sponsored by the Oklahoma Arts Council and Ponca City Arts and Humanities Council.

1 p.m. - Gunfight performed by Riders of the Cimarron - sponsored by Smith Tool

Bring your kids and lawn chairs and enjoy the events in the street.

On the Library and City Hall lawns

Hobbyhorse barrel racing - sponsored by ConocoPhillips.

Mechanical bull rides - sponsored by Ward's Air Conditioning.

Rodeo Queens' autographs - sponsored by the 101 Ranch Rodeo Foundation.

Pony rides - sponsored by the 101 Ranch Rodeo Foundation.

Tie the ribbon on the goat tail - sponsored by the library.

Cow patty throw - sponsored by the library.

Dummy roping - sponsored by the library.

Book Sale - sponsored by Friends of the Ponca City Library.

101 Ranch Picture Display - sponsored by 101 Ranch Collectors.

Inside the Library

Wild West photo exhibit - sponsored by the Oklahoma Humanities Council & ConocoPhillips.

Public Invited To Queen Activities
Rodeo queens will be arriving in Ponca City Thursday, Aug. 19. Several queens' activities are scheduled and the public is invited to attend.

A luncheon will be held at the Ponca City Country Club on Friday, Aug. 20, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Guests will be given the opportunity to see queen contestants model outfits and hear their speeches, both requirements for Miss 101 Rodeo Queen. Lunch will consist of a deli buffet at $10 per person.

Horsemanship competition will also be held Friday, at the Play Pen Arena at 5 p.m. Guests will witness the queens perform a pattern on horseback, a question and answer session with judges, and a queen's run.

Saturday, Aug. 16, the queens will be at the Kids rodeo in front of the Ponca City Library immediately after riding in the parade which starts at 10 a.m. They will be helping out with booths and visiting with the kids.

Autograph sessions will be held at Davis Moore and Corral West Saturday afternoon and at each nightly performance of the Rodeo.

Queen coronation will be held after the grand entry at Saturday's rodeo performance.

Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Here Again for 101 Wild West Rodeo
The Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company headquartered in Tahlequah, owned by Dell Hall, will again be the rodeo producer of the 101 Wild West Rodeo here this week.

Rafter H has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys as well, providing stock for a three-night plus slack rodeo.

Hall has spent over the last 36 years in the stock contracting business and the last 25 as a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA).

A former contestant in both riding and timed events, Dell Hall knows that the draw-end of the business' can either make or break a contestant. When contestants pull up to a rodeo, they need to draw an animal that they or any other contestant can place on to win money. In respect for the rodeo as a whole, Hall tries to keep his stock as even as possible for all the contestants entered.

Most recent awards from the Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company have been in 1999 when the Prairie Circuit (Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska) named specific stock from the firm Saddle bronc of the Year and Bull of the Year.

The 1998 PRCA Bucking Bull of the Year Skoal's King Kong was from Rafter H, and there have been numerous awards prior to that, including Bucking Bull of the Year in the PRCA in 1984 and 1981. Other awards have gone back as far as 1979.

National Anthem Singers for 101 Wild West Rodeo
Hannah Denny is the 12-year-old daughter of Mark and Laura Denny and will sing the National Anthem at Thursday's performance of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

She has two older brothers, Daniel and Travis, and one older sister, Sarah. She just completed the 5th grade at Union Elementary, where she was a member of the Honor Choir.
Debbie Boles Loughridge began her entertainment career in 1986 and became the featured vocalist with the Northern Oklahoma College show group "The Roustabouts". Since then she appeared as lead singer in various groups in north central Oklahoma and southern Kansas.

Debbie opens many events with the National Anthem and pre show entertainment, which she will perform Friday night.
Kimberly Evans is the 18-year-old daughter of Bruce and Debbie Evans. She is a 2004 Ponca City High School graduate and will attending Oklahoma University this fall, where she will be pursuing a degree in law.

This will be Kimberly's second time to sing here at the 101 Wild West Rodeo. She first sang here in 1996 when she was 10 years old. Kimberly has sung the National Anthem at sporting events and other school related awards ceremonies. Besides singing, she also enjoys dancing and acting. She will perform on Saturday night.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo -2004

"Seize the day!" is the motto by which Lacey Stubblefield lives her life. She believes in setting attainable goals and working hard to achieve those goals. On Sept. 6, 2003, Lacey achieved one of the most desired goals of her life when she was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2004. She is the reigning 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen.

 

Lacey first dreamed of becoming Miss Oklahoma Rodeo at a young age. Most of her childhood was spent on a horse, either in the pasture or in a rodeo arena.

 

Lacey's love for rodeo and competitiveness soon became accompanied by her desire to promote and represent the sport. She traveled within the state of Oklahoma in 2000 as Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen.

During high school, Lacey held the position of FFA president, participated in livestock (swine) showing and livestock judging, as well as public speaking. Lacey is currently a junior attending Northwestern Oklahoma State University in Alva pursuing a degree in Agri-business and Animal science. Lacey is a member of the Northwestern Aggie-Club and competes in the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association.

Upon graduating from Northwestern, Lacey plans to transfer to Oklahoma State University to obtain a master's degree in a related Agricultural field.

Lacey's parents are Steve and Ruth Stubblefield of Enid. Lacey is excited to have the opportunity to serve as an ambassador for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. Her goals as Miss Oklahoma Rodeo are to educate the general public about rodeo, including the heritage, lifestyle, sportsmanship, and family values that rodeo promotes.

Lacey believes it is increasingly vital to demonstrate to children all that rodeo has to offer. Not only will children grow to be lifelong fans and supporters of the sport, but rodeo also builds positive role models, which are so desperately needed in today's society. Lacey is not only a native to the state of Oklahoma, but more importantly she is a native to rodeo.

A Bar-B-Q and Hamburger Dinner Fund Raiser for Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Lacey Stubblefield will be held Friday at the Moose Lodge from 5 to 7 p.m. before the nightly 101 Wild West Rodeo. The menu will consist of Bar-B-Q sandwiches, hamburgers with all the trimmings, baked beans, cowboy potatoes and a drink for $5.00 for Adults and $3.00 for children 9 and under, the fund raiser will help Lacey with her expenses to compete for Miss Rodeo America in Las Vegas prior to the Wrangler Nationals Finals Rodeo in December 2004.

101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen's Competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen, according to Pageant Director, Linda Mauk.

"Our queen's competition offers a wealth of gifts and prizes, including a handmade, hand tooled queen's saddle valued well over $1,200.

Numerous Ponca City merchants have donated awards and gifts for the queen, horsemanship and runner-up winners.

Ponca Tribal Member Rosetta LeClair has hand-beaded a traveling tiara and sash for our queen, keeping the Native American influence a part of the 101 Heritage.

Activities for the candidates include a Queen's luncheon and style show, appearances in the parade, media appearances and interviews, as well as appearances and autograph sessions during each night's rodeo performances.

The contestants are judged 40% on horsemanship, 30% on public speaking, 15% each on appearance and 15% on personality. The coronation will be during Saturday's performance.

The contestants are Tori Walton, Newkirk; Brenda Linde, Pawhuska; Kimber Craighead, Mustang; and Laura Sentel, Ponca City.

Tori Walton is the 13-year-old daughter of Glenn and Lora Walton of Newkirk. She is a 3 year member of the Martha Washington 4-H club participating in the horse project. As a 2 year member of the Newkirk Chapter of the Future Fanners of America, she enjoys livestock judging and showing swine. In past years she has participated in many sports including dance, softball, basketball and cheerleading.

Tori is a first year member of the Oklahoma Kansas Youth Rodeo Association competing in barrel racing and pole bending. Tori has participated in the Arkansas City Mavericks Rodeo Princess contest for 2 years and is the reining Princess for 2004. As a freshman at Newkirk High School she has chosen classes that will bring her closer to her goals of attending Oklahoma State University and majoring in veterinary medicine.

Tori enjoys helping her mother at her child care center and tries to be a great role model for other children of her community.

Brandi Linde is the 22-year-old daughter of Randy and Lorraine Linde of Pawhuska. She attended Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College on a Rodeo Scholarship and plans to obtain a degree as a Veterinary Technician.

Linde has been roping since the age of 8 and has received awards and saddles in team roping. She also enjoys basketball, softball and spending time with her family.

Kimber Craighead is the 18-year-old daughter of Gary and Susan Craighead of Mustang. She is currently attending the University of Central Oklahoma, where she is pursuing a degree in nursing.

At an early age, she fell in love with horses and has always been competitive. She found rodeo to be her outlet for being competitive while doing something she loved. Since that time she has completed in horsemanship activities such as barrel racing, pole bending and breakaway roping.

Kimber's awards include 2001 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen, 2000 Reserve World Champion Pole Bender at the Palomino World Show, 2000 Selling Rodeo Queen and 1999 First Runner-Up Miss Rodeo Princess. She also enjoys snowboarding, snow skiing, whitewater rafting, fast pitch softball and cheerleading.

Laura Sentel is the 19-year-old daughter of Lonnie and Jennifer Sentel of Ponca City. She is currently attending Meridian Technology Center where she is studying radiology.

Laura has acquired numerous awards while competing in barrel racing, pole bending and goat tying. She has also won the 2002 first runner up in the Braman rodeo queen contest, 2002 first runner up in the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen contest and 2003 Miss Congeniality in the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen contest. She also enjoys softball, swimming, river rafting and just spending time with family and friends.

101 Wild West Rodeo Has a Rich History
The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be making its first three-night run in Ponca City, after ten years of four-night performances as the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

After several years of running a four-night performance rodeo, the foundation voted this year to return to a three-night performance with Wednesday reserved for rodeo slack.

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be August 19-21 with performances set for 8 p.m. at the 101101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue, and not at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect.

The 2004 Rodeo will mark the 45th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo - the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends - the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

'Round-Up' Was First Rodeo

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a "round-up" or "buffalo chase" as an entertainment incentive for a National Editorial Association -convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix's debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the "101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show" things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

The History Continues

Most people in the area are aware that Ponca City is near the site of the once famous 101 Ranch. A drive on Oklahoma 156, recently dedicated as "101 Ranch Memorial Road" south to Marland off U.S. 60 will bring you right to the scene. It is located about five miles south of U.S. 60 just north of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River. But there's not much left of the original stately buildings left on the grounds.

Few may realize that the 101 Ranch name was part of an early day rodeo but it hasn't been held here forever. The 101 Ranch Rodeo officially began in Ponca City as part of the Cherokee Strip Celebration of 1960, and was known as the Cherokee Strip Rodeo for the first two years.

Back in late 1959, a rodeo committee, part of the Agriculture Committee of the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, began planning for the first event. Their efforts resulted in a first-class RCA approved rodeo which became part of the nationwide rodeo circuit.

Scott Hancock chaired that committee, and went on to head the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, formed in late 1960 by the Chamber of Commerce to continue the popular rodeo in future years.

No one had anticipated how highly successful that first rodeo would be. Thanks to successful promotion techniques, organization, and early ticket sales (including sales by the six rodeo queen contestants), an estimated 25,000 persons attended four performances over the Cherokee Strip Celebration weekend in September.

Originally, two evening and one afternoon performances were slated, but a fourth performance was added due to public demand. A capacity crowd witnessed that fourth performance, in which 77 individuals participated in events which included bareback bronc riding, calf roping, barrel racing, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling and bull riding.

The rodeo was held in a field north of what was then the Agriculture Building on West Hartford (east of the current Park Department building). A junior baseball diamond which was located in the field at that time was relocated near the Tracy W. Young Army Reserve Center, 805 West Hartford. Bleachers to seat 5,000 were constructed in the fenced area, which measured 200 by 300 feet.

Jim Garner, then of "Maverick" fame, was scheduled to attend evening performances of the rodeo on Sept. 16 and 17, and to serve as parade marshal for the Cherokee Strip Parade on Sept. 17.

Walter Alsbaugh of Alamoso, Colo., was producer for that first rodeo, providing 275 head of quality stock for the many varied events. Alsbaugh produced all of the 101 Ranch Rodeos, until the Rumford Rodeo Company of Abbyville, Kan., took over that job in 1991. And then The Rafter H Rodeo Livestock Company headquartered in Tahlequah, owned by Dell Hall, took over in 1998.

Queens for the rodeo were Miss Bessie Cales and Miss Carole Muchmore. Queen selection was based 50 percent upon the number of tickets sold to the event. Queen hostess was Mrs. Ann Corzine, and Connie Corzine was queen mascot. The title of rodeo queen has always been coveted by area horsewomen.

According to newspaper reports of the event, the top winner in the grand finals rodeo was Bob Wegner, who received $103.20 for placing first in bull riding competition. Several all around cowboys were named including Zeke Henry, who earned $356.30 over the course of the rodeo weekend; Merle Davis (of Ponca City), who garnered $257.72; and Bob Williams, whose winning totaled $180.31.

The following year, a new rodeo site was selected - 11 1/2 acres owned by the city just east of Darr School at the intersection of West Prospect and the extension of North Ash (present location). Permanent bleachers to seat 8,000 were installed on the rodeo grounds in 1962.

In 1961, the rodeo was known as the Ponca City Cherokee Strip RCA World Championship Rodeo.

Top money that year went to Duane Hennigh of Laverne, who earned a total of $611.59 competing in bareback riding, bulldogging (steer wrestling) and bull riding. Second place was taken by Albert Rose of Kim, Colo., who received $409.07 for his efforts in saddle bronc riding and bulldogging.

The celebrity of note for the three-day event was George "Gabby" Hayes, the western comedy actor, who entertained at all three performances of the rodeo. A crowd of 6,000 was in attendance at the final performance.

Another featured attraction at the rodeo was the Sedgwick County Sheriff's Posse, which performed on horseback during the weekend. Queen for the 1961 rodeo was Miss Priscilla Ann Wilson of Ponca City, selected from six area candidates.

In 1962, the Rodeo officially became known as the 101 Ranch Rodeo, after the grandchildren of the 101 Ranch founder, Col. George W. Miller, agreed to allow the use of the Ranch name. The Rodeo was also granted permission to use the insignia which is symbolic of the once famous 101 Ranch. The ranch was located nine miles southwest of Ponca City, on the Salt Fork River.

Guest star for the first official 101 Ranch Rodeo was Pernell Roberts, then playing Adam Cartwright on the popular, top-rated television show, "Bonanza." Roberts was in attendance at all three performances, and also rode in the traditional rodeo parade.

A feature article in The News noted that besides the name 101 Ranch Rodeo, another connection existed between this rodeo and the ranch. The old ticket office, used for performances of the enormous 101 Ranch Wild West Show, was being moved to the rodeo site where it would be used as an information center. As far as anyone could determine, the ticket office was built in 1924 when the site of the 101 Ranch Rodeo/Wild West Show was relocated to a field north of the Salt Fork River and east of Oklahoma 156. Water marks on both the interior and exterior of the building indicated that the Salt Fork River had crept into the building more than once at its original location.

In addition to the bleachers which were constructed in 1962 to accommodate 8,000, box seats were also added to accommodate several hundred more spectators.

The all-around cowboy that year, for the second year running, was Duane Hennigh, who went home with $1,074.53 in earnings. Joy LeGrand was chosen as 101 Ranch Rodeo Queen in 1962.

Since that time, the 101 Ranch Rodeo has continued to be an annual event in Ponca City, drawing crowds from the surrounding areas and featuring cowboys from the nation's rodeo circuit. In 1974, the rodeo began to be held in August instead of coinciding with the Cherokee Strip Celebration weekend in September.

The 101 Ranch Rodeo is sanctioned by the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and the Women's Professional Rodeo Association. The event is sponsored by the 101 Ranch Rodeo Foundation and the Ponca City Area Chamber of Commerce.

The 2004 rodeo will attempt to bring "Rodeo of the Year" prize from the three state Prairie Circuit, which includes all Professional Rodeo Cowboy Association rodeos in Oklahoma, Colorado and Kansas. It was won last year and has been won by the Ponca City association several times in the past few years.

There are several events during the rodeo for youngsters, and the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, headed by Larry Goodno, contracts with a number of interesting one-act exhibitions for the three night stand.

Many local event sponsors are recognized by special "Chute Heaven" box seats just above the arena chutes, where selected friends and neighbors get a chance to really view what's going on right out front and behind the scenes.

Please visit the 101 Wild West Rodeo website at www.101wildwestrodeo.com for updated information and more on the 44 years of history of the 101 Ranch Rodeo/101 Wild West Rodeo.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess 2004 is Lauren Underwood, the 10-year-old daughter of Kurt and Rene' Underwood.

She along with her brother Wyatt reside on the family ranch in Tecumseh.

At age 9, Lauren was crowned Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess.

She is the youngest contestant to ever win this title.

Lauren also won the horsemanship and Clem McSpadden speech awards.

Lauren is an honor student at Cross-Timbers Elementary school.

She enjoys showing horses, 4-H, competing in barrel racing, running poles, and goat tying in the Heart of Oklahoma Youth Rodeo Association, The Tecumseh Roundup Club as well has open rodeos.

Lauren will be traveling to events throughout 2004 to promote the western lifestyle, the sport of rodeo, the professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, and the State of Oklahoma.

Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Teen 2004 Krystal Burrows, is the 18-year-old daughter of Ron and Kathy Burrows of Claremore. She is a freshman at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater and is majoring in Animal Science.

Krystal's involvement with the sport of rodeo began at an early age. Being around rodeo since she could walk, Krystal has always had a passion to be a part of rodeo in anyway that she could. With Krystal's love of horses, she has been riding and showing since she was eight and was in her first Rodeo Queen contest at the age of 11.

In addition to rodeo, Miss Burrows enjoys riding, training and showing her American Paint Horses. Currently her primary horse is a three-year-old red roan gelding named American Top Gun, "Maverick" Krystal is training him to be an All Around show horse.

Krystal enjoys doing things from trail rides with her friends and family, playing sports, shopping, camping, and hanging out with her sister Amanda are just a few of her hobbies.

Krystal is looking forward to a very exciting and fun filled year traveling across the State of Oklahoma and to surrounding states. Krystal states that "Given an opportunity to educate others about the sport of rodeo and what its involvement has done for her is a privilege that she is honored to do."

"Anything can be accomplished with faith, believe in yourself!"

Rivinius Shows Determination, Style
Josh Rivinius has a passion for the sport of rodeo. He provides one major function, and that is cowboy protection. It is his job to keep the Bullrider out of harms way in the rodeo arena and put his life on the line for a fallen cowboy.

Josh was born and raised in a rodeo family as well as being a cowboy. He has competed in rodeo his whole life starting with little britches rodeos on to high school rodeo, amateur ranks, and then furthered his career to become a PRCA Bullfighter.

Josh has competed in bareback riding, steer wrestling, and roping events, and 1997 he started bullfighting and has become his biggest achievement. Josh has earned respect of the bullriders and peers and has a ring of honors to follow.

He is very familiar with the rodeo industry and has a dedication to the sport and cowboy way of life. Josh has established himself as a premier Professional Bullfighter and a new young gun in the industry. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability and cowboy protection in the rodeo arena and professionalism and hard work where ever he may go. 2003 will be his 7th year of fighting bulls and is looking forward to a successful 2003 season and future.

Josh's rodeo accomplishments include:

5x -- North Dakota Rodeo Association (NDRA) Bullfighter of the year, 1998-1999- 2000-2001-2002.

5x -- NDRA Finals Bullfighter 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002.

4x -- North Dakota High School Finals Bullfighter 1998,1999, 2000, 2001.

2x -- Badlands Professional Bull riders Finals Bullfighter 2001, 2002.

2x -- Montana High School Finals Bullfighter 2001, 2002.

2x -- Great Plains Indian Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2x -- Beauty and the Beast Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2x -- We Be Bull Riding Finals Bullfighter 1999, 2000.

2002 -- Buck Fest Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).

2001 -- North Dakota Rough Rider Association Bullfighter of the year.

2001 -- North Dakota (RRA) Finals Bullfighter.

2001 -- Wild West Rodeo Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).

2001 -- Bull Blast Champion Bullfighter (Free style Bullfight).

Kick Up a Little Dust With This Bullfighter
If you are looking for exciting bullfighting and crowd-pleasing performances, look no further than Dusty Essick. Dusty has been fighting bulls professionally since 1994. He has been blessed with a successful career right from the start, working events all over the nation-including PRCA major rodeos, professional bull riding events and freestyle bullfighting competitions. His unique skills and professional reputation make him one of the most sought-after bullfighters on the rodeo circuit today.

In the arena, Dusty's top priority is protecting cowboys in the bullriding competition. Dusty has earned the confidence and trust of all the top bullriders across the country. They know that he will do whatever it takes to keep them safe.

Dusty also has a deep passion for freestyle bullfighting and remains active in bullfighting competitions. He knows there's nothing better for maintaining his skills than dueling one-on-one with these four-legged aggressive athletes.

Dusty's rodeo accomplishments include:

2001 -- World Championship Bullfight Finals Champion.

2001 -- Copenhagen Cup Summer Tour Finals Bullfighter -- Dallas, Texas.

2001 -- Salinas, California Bullfighting Champion.

7th Overall In The 2000 Wrangler Bullfight World Standings.

1996 -- Summer Olympics Exhibition Bullfighter -- Atlanta, Ga.

1996 -- NFR Bull Sale Bullfighting Champion.

Meet This Year's Barrelman Bryan Hope
Bryan Hope -- "The Rodeo Comedian." Hope brings 27 years as a rodeo performer with experience including bullfighter, clown, barrelman and specialty acts. He has an interactive style that holds something for everyone.

 

Bryan Hope had to quit riding rodeo bulls and bucking broncs because he said "it hurt too much." So now he plays "tag" with angry bulls, hides in a barrel and lets the aggravated animals butt him around rodeo arenas all over the country.

As one of the top professional rodeo clowns in the eastern United States, Bryan "fights bulls" and entertains crowds at rodeos from Missouri to Pennsylvania to Georgia.

"I started riding rodeo when I was in the 8th grade." says the 1988 Lander College physical education graduate. "I lived in Orlando (Fla.) and my brother worked at a ranch that produced rodeos. In fact, two of my older brothers rode rodeo and so I began riding steers. Then I graduated to bulls and eventually I did a little of everything." After Bryan's family moved to South Carolina his father organized the first high school rodeo in the state. Shortly thereafter, in 1977, Bryan won the South Carolina High School Rodeo All-Around Championship. While competing in the high school rodeos, Bryan became interested in becoming a rodeo clown.

"I guess I was 15 or 16 when I first worked as a clown in a rodeo," he said. "I kept gettin' thrown off and gettin' hurt ridin', so I thought I'd try being a clown. I've really been a clown my whole life -- I just saw an opportunity to finally get paid for it in the rodeo."

After getting hung up in the stirrup of a bucking horse and injuring his hand so badly that he had to have it pinned and wired back together, Bryan decided to get serious about clowning. He attended the Lyle Sankey Rodeo School in Rose Hill, Kan., where he polished his funny acts, and learned how to save the lives of cowboys in trouble.

"The main job of the clowns is to help bullriders who've fallen and then to entertain the crowds," Bryan said.

However, "helping bullriders" is not, as rodeo fans know, quite as simple as it sounds.

"As soon as the bull comes out of the chute, my job is to get him goin' in circles, so the rider will get a good ride, one he can score high on," Bryan explained. "Then, when his ride is over, I've got to keep the cowboy from gettin' hooked. I need to get the bull to chase me."

Waving his brightly-clad arms, Bryan jumps, hoots'n'hollers, even slaps bulls on their noses when necessary, to divert attention away from fallen cowboys. Or sometimes he climbs in his special barrel and lets the irate animals knock him around awhile.

It's certainly no vacation for the meek at heart.

Bryan has collected his share of bruises, cuts and broken bones in the line of duty. "Clowning in the rodeo is like anything else," he said. "You make mistakes in the beginning and you pay for 'em." Bryan has paid for his mistakes with broken ribs, and feet, torn cartilage in his knee and endless sprains, bruises, aches and pains.

Fortunately, Bryan's experience and popularity have allowed him to climb the rodeo clowning ladder and he's now able to concentrate primarily on "being funny," often leaving the bullfighting to younger clowns or those who simply prefer that more hazardous side of the business.

"I'm at a higher level of rodeo now where I don't have to mess with the bulls so much," he said "I can just be funny. The best part is I get paid just as much as I would if I were in there fightin' bulls."

And being funny is something that comes naturally to this down-home, gregarious young man with an "I-might-just-be-pulling-your-leg" twinkling in his eyes and a very rich and sincere Southern drawl.

Before and between rodeo events, one might find Bryan transformed into "Evil Boll Weevil," complete with cape and football helmet, ready to jump two tractor trailers with his motorcycle. Two tractor trailers, that is most likely manufactured by Tonka, not Mack. Or he might be shooting his pet chicken, Randolph, out of a cannon and "around the world." (Not to fear chicken lovers -- Randolph is stuffed)

Although Bryan uses a motorcycle in his clown act, motorcycle riding is not one of his favorite hobbies.

Want to know why? "It's too dangerous," he said. "Those things can hurt you."

Shriners To Entertain at 101 Rodeo Parade
Clowns, colorful floats and funny little cars will roar through town on Saturday in the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade. Shriners have divided to do Collinsville at 10 a.m. and Ponca City at 10 a.m.

The theme of this year's Shriner's float is "Giving Help and Hope for Over 81 Years" and it will be accompanied by members of the Akdar Shrine, Tulsa's Shriners chapter donning their trademark little red hats, called a fez.

Akdar Shrine participates in more than 56 hometown parades each year, to entertain the community and promote fundraising initiatives for Shriners Hospitals for Children throughout the country.

Shriners Hospitals for Children were founded in 1922 to serve children and orthopaedic, spinal cord and burn related injuries and illnesses at no cost to their parents or guardians. More than 1,020 children from Northern Oklahoma are currently being treated by Shriners Hospitals and Burn Institutes, and all are sponsored by the funds raised by members of the Tulsa's Akdar Shrine.

Fall of 2003 marked the 81st Anniversary of Shriners Hospitals and the 131st Anniversary of the establishment of Mecca Shrine in New York Masonic Hall.

Today, the Shriner's medical network is comprised of 22 North American hospitals, 18 orthopaedic care facilities and four centers dedicated to burn treatment and research. More than 735,000 children nationwide have been cured or materially assisted at these treatment centers. Because the entire cost of operating these facilities is borne entirely by the Shriners philanthropic organization, fundraising efforts are critical by each and every chapter.

Application for treatment at every Shriner medical program is open to every child, regardless of financial status. If you would like more information about contributions to the Shriners Hospitals for Children, or know a child with an orthopaedic, spinal cord or burn injury in need, please ask a Shriner or call 918-836-2528.

Shriners continue to collect stuffed animals/toys and deliver to their Shrine Hospitals.

Visit Akdar's website:
www.AkdarShrine.ORG

World All-Around Champion Appears at Rodeo Here
Winning the 2002 world all-around championship might have been a watershed moment in the career of Trevor Brazile, but it didn't satisfy him. It only whet his appetite for more. One day after winning the title, Brazile sat down to draw up a plan to duplicate the feat in 2003.

Brazile decided to make a three-pronged attack on the world all-around race by focusing his efforts on tie-down roping, team roping and steer roping. He carefully selected the rodeos where he would compete and how he would divide his efforts between the three events.

That plan proved to be a smashing success.

Brazile finished with a near-record $294,839 to run away with the world all-around race during the 45th annual Wrangler National Finals Rodeo, Dec. 5-14 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas.

Brazile's onslaught was so overwhelming that his second world all-around title was secured with much less drama than his first.

In 2002, the race between Brazile and Jesse Bail went down to the final tie-down roping run on the final day. This year, Brazile locked up the title in Round 9, turning the 10th round into a victory celebration for one of ProRodeo's most talented cowboys.

The victory put Brazile in rare company. He became only the 10th cowboy since the PRCA began awarding all-around titles in 1949 to win back-to-back world all-around titles. The last one to do it was Joe Beaver in 1995-96.

"I was talking to my wife about how this year wasn't as close as last year," said Brazile, 27, from Decatur, Texas. "I wondered if it wouldn't feel as special. I was wrong. This is really special. It feels great."

Coming into the Wrangler NFR, Bail, who qualified in saddle bronc riding and bull riding, was the only cowboy with a realistic chance of catching Brazile, who held a $72,725 lead over Bail at the end of the regular-season. This year, however, Bail never mounted a serious challenge, ending the year with $196,430, good for fourth place in the world all-around standings. Tiedown roper Cody Ohl finished second with $222,025, after turning in a spectacular performance in Las Vegas.

"The regular season went exactly like I planned out," Brazile said. "The Monday after we were done right here (in 2002), I knew I didn't want to be in that situation again, where it came down to the last calf on the last day. If it did, that's fine. But I didn't feel I'd reached my full potential. I knew if I worked at it, the team roping was definitely a possibility, and it was. I'm real thankful for that."

In reality, Brazile's plan held up through some trying circumstances. His top tie-down roping horse, Tweeter, was hurt and unable to perform all year. And Brazile sprained both his ankles in the early spring, severely handicapping him.

"You don't realize how hard it is to win until you try to compete injured against the best cowboys in the world," Brazile said.

Yet, Brazile managed to rebound from both setbacks. He purchased a new tiedown roping horse, Rock, who ended up second in the voting for AQHA Tie-Down Roping Horse of the Year. And once Brazile's ankles healed, he was off to the races, so to speak, swiftly taking control of the world standings.

After years of being lauded for his potential, Brazile finally began living up to it the past two years. A key reason for that has been Brazile's approach to the sport.

"My first year I came here (Wrangler NFR), I'd have done anything to go the Gold Coast (where the go-round winners are honored)," Brazile said. "But now, if I have my pockets full on Sunday, then I did what I came for."

Indeed, Brazile has learned when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em. If that means playing it safe to remain in the aggregate race, rather than risking all for the round win, then that's what Brazile will do - even if that disappoints fans at times.

"The fans of professional rodeo are, in my opinion, the best anywhere," Brazile said. "You want to do good for them. But you want to be there on Sunday afternoon also. You've got to kind of weigh out the deals and take chances when you can and be smart when you can."

That strategy paid off handsomely in Las Vegas where Brazile earned $43,391 in tiedown roping and $36,147 in team roping.

He also earned $17,013 at the National Finals Steer Roping.

Brazile's newfound maturity took a while to develop. It was a maturity that was nurtured by many people, including some of rodeo's greatest cowboys.

"A lot of people have helped me," Brazile said. "I've relied on the advice of a number of individuals. My dad (Jimmie Brazile), he's with me all day every day. Roy Cooper (an eight-time world champion and Brazile's step-father-in-law) has helped me. Joe Beaver (an eight-time world champion), I rode out to the NFR every day with Joe. We talked about it. He's good for me. He was there for me last year.

"Cody Ohl (five-time world champion), he's always good for a pick-me-up. It's good talking to him. Speedy (seven-time world champion Speed Williams) is a lot of help, too. He's helped me with my heading."

There's someone else, too, who has helped Brazile hone his approach to ProRodeo. "What a surprise? My wife (Shada) had been there and done that the whole time Roy was winning his championships," Brazile said. "I don't take anything she says lightly. I joke about it, but my rookie year, she knew way more about it (rodeo) than I did. We talk about it a lot."

About the only part of Brazile's plan that he could criticize was his start at the Wrangler NFR. It took him a while to get going, but once he did, he quickly put the competition away.

"I got off to a lot slower start than I'd have liked to. But it seems like that's characteristic," Brazile said. "My draw wasn't very good the first three nights. I'm real pleased with the momentum I got going, but I didn't get much done during the first three rounds."

Brazile's plan coming into the Wrangler NFR was simply to win as much money as he could and worry about the all-around race later. It didn't mean going for first every time out of the box.

"Here, three thirds are better than one first, which I've learned with a little bit of experience," Brazile said. "My first year here, I'd have traded a go-round win for a potload of money. Things change. You mature."

And now, it looks like Brazile will be a force to be reckoned with in the all-around race for years to come.

"I'm hoping to make it a three-peat in 2004," he said.

Winning two world titles is a situation for which Brazile is truly thankful and one he certainly doesn't take for granted.

"I'm just blessed to be able to do what I love," Brazile said. "To be good at it is a bonus."

101 Wild West Rodeo Opens With Slack Runs
OFFICIAL THREE-DAY RUN STARTS TODAY
Steer ropers were aplenty at the slack portion of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Wednesday at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena. There were 53 listed, with five not showing for specific reasons -- and the remaining ones really put on a show.

Included in the steer roping was a great duel between the National Finals Steer Roper Guy Allen of Santa Anna, Texas, and the 2003 All-Around Cowboy Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas.

Starting about 6:30 p.m., the cowboys began tossing ropes around the horns of those Rafter H rodeo stock of Dell Hall, Tahlequah, and finished slightly after 9 p.m. Then it was time for some slack steer wrestling, tie-down (calf) roping and team roping.

Prior to those events however, early viewers of the slack part of the rodeo were treated to some nifty, quick horses guided by a total of seven cowgirls in the barrel racing event that saw the opening racer nab the best time of the seven. And none of the barrels were spilled for additional timing, indicating some really good horsemanship.

The rodeo officially opens a three-night performance, complete with all of the regular events and specialty acts, at the arena on North Ash Street along West Prospect Avenue, at 8 p.m. tonight. The other two performances are Friday and Saturday night. However, in particular, on Saturday activities begin with the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade in downtown Ponca City at 10 a.m. and will also include a lot of activity following the parade at the Ponca City Library, both inside and out.

Best efforts in the barrels were Toma Nuffer of Medicine Lodge, Kan., with a 17.74 and Jana Wehkamp, Perkins, who had a 17.88 for the only ones getting the cloverleaf pattern done under the 18-second barrier. Dani Turner had an 18.05 for the next best, but the others were 18.55 or better.

The duel started with Allen up first during the first of two go-rounds, and he promptly put a 9.9 on the board, which was well up the ladder for that first round. However, Brazile had a 10.7 and then posted a 9.1 early in the second round to go into the top spot for all ropers with the 19.8 on two head. That was something for all ropers to shoot at, since he was the third roper of the second go-round. Allen didn't disappoint, but had to go a little further out of the chute than intended and had a 12.1 for a two-head time of 22.0, which put him in second place.

A pair of Pawhuska steer ropers, Shorty Garten, with a 10.2 and Rod Hartness, with a 10.0 put swift, early marks on the scoresheets. But J.P. Wickett of Sallisaw had a 9.5, for best in the first go. Brazile's 9.1 stood up for the best time in the second go.

There were 44 entered in the tie-down roping and 40 in the steer wrestling, plus an additional 22 teams in the team roping event competing in first go-rounds throughout the rest of the night, which ended shortly before 1 a.m. Thursday.

Russell Wells of Lindsey had a 7.6 in the tie-down roping to lead, with the final roper of the night, Brock McLemore of Gracemont doing it in 8.3 seconds. Next were Tate Watkins of Alva at 8.4 and Hunter Ambrose Herrin of Apache with an 8.8 for fourth.

In the steer wrestling, E. P. Luchsinger of Atoka had a 3.7 and right behind were Blake Mindemann and Marty Musil posting 4.4 each.

The final team ropers of the night also had things going their way, when they posted a 6.7. They were header Nick Sartain of Yukon and Shannon Frascht of Alva. Right behind with a 6.9 were Destry Graham of Sallisaw and heeler Stitches Stanley of Rose. Todd Markham of Vinita and Ken Bailey of Henryetta finished with a 7.3 for third in the first go-round.

The rodeo events tonight will include bull riding, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, and team roping along with girls barrel racing. And there will be specialty acts along with amateur team-roping and a new event for the rodeo, three-member teams in a wild cow milking contest. Scheduled are five of those teams. Top amateur team-ropers will compete Saturday for coveted prizes as well.

Unofficial 'Grand' Entry
TUESDAY WAS THE FINAL day of the annual Kelly Trail Ride which unofficially kicks off the 101 Wild West Rodeo. Sixty-five riders participated in the ride Tuesday along with five wagons. The trail ride, a family tradition which started in 1977, includes four generations of the Kelly family and had Dewey Kelly driving the lead wagon. The ride started Saturday south of the Salt Fork bridge on U.S. 177 in the Bressie Community, and headed north until it reached Standing Bear Park. The group spent four days riding together around the area. Saturday night the group was treated to a barbecue provided by Michael and Joyce Kelly. Tuesday the riders continued their ride from Standing Bear Park north along Fourth Street, west on Grand Avenue and north on Ash until they reached the 101 Rodeo grounds. (News Photo by Lela Bouse-McCracken)

Rodeo Contestants Battle Muddy Arena
It was a sloppy night for performers the first night of the 45th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena in the northwest part of Ponca City.

Showers during the day had provided enough moisture to keep the arena from becoming dusty, but a hard downpour near the supper hour left the arena floor a really soggy place.

Despite the sloppy footing, the times and scores failed to dampen some of the performers spirits. And there will be two more nights of rodeo tonight and Saturday, both at 8 p.m., and hopefully with some better conditions. Don't forget also, the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade Saturday at 10 a.m. along Grand Avenue in downtown Ponca City. Other activities are also scheduled, mostly at the Ponca City Library.

Saturday will also include the coronation of the 2004 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen. The five contestants seeking the title are Kimber Craighead of Mustang, Brandi Linde of Pawhuska, Laura Sentel of Ponca City, and Tori Walton of Newkirk. The event will be held shortly after the Grand Entry Saturday.

While there were few cowboys able to stay aboard the bulls in the final event of the evening, a 74 by Steven Clark of Mineral Wells, Texas, on of all bulls, Barstool from the Dell Hall rodeo contractor of Rafter H fascinated the crowd as they prepared to leave the arena.

From the Grand Entry performance of the 101 Wild West Drill Team, it appeared that a slow night was on the agenda, simply because of the footing. There were however, some good times in the steer wrestling, tie-down (calf) roping and team roping.

Cowgirls in the barrel racing event were unable to break the 18-second barrier although Stillwater's Gretchen Benbenek had an 18.08. That sits fourth behind the slack performers on Wednesday, including leader Toma Nuffer of Medicine Lodge at 17.74 and Perkins' Jana Wehkamp who had 17.88. Dani Turner also had 18.05 on Wednesday.

Youngsters were only disappointed in the calf scramble when they had a really tough time getting the ribbons off the calves, who took advantage of the arena footing by getting away from the muddied kids. Event director Gary Parli finally announced that the first ones to the gate near the announcer's stand, after a mostly unsuccessful attempt, were going to be rewarded with the $5 that had been allotted for each ribbon. The calves, most with ribbons still on their tails, were herded back into the holding pens.

Rafter H rodeo contractor secretary Shelley Hall provided final and payoff information on the steer roping event held Wednesday as part of the slack performance. As announced earlier, 2003 All-Around Cowboy Trevor Brazile of Decatur, Texas, got first money in average amounting to $1,047.84 on his 19.8 combined on two head. He also got that amount for the 9.1 during the second round. First in the first round with that amount of money went to J.P. Wickett on a 9.5.

Guy Allen, of Santa Anna, Texas, took second in the first go on 9.9 and 22.0 average for $867.18 in each of the two plus a 12.1 in the second go-round earned sixth money of $180.66. Allen had won his 17th world steer roping title a year ago in Amarillo, Texas, breaking the 16 that had been won by legendary Jim Shoulders.

Three of the four contestants in the bareback riding got the crowd in the spirit of the rodeo right after the Grand Entry, with scores on their respective broncs. Brandon Holmes of Eva, Ala., did it right away when he got an 81 on Dollar Snuff. But right behind were Lance Kelly, Queensland, Australia, and Chip Does IV of Philadelphia, Miss., each with 73s.

Saddle bronc riding was a bit easier on the cowboys, although the percentage of riders scoring was slightly less, with five of nine making the full eight-second ride. Best of the bunch was Cody DeMoss of Crowville, La., who had an 83 on SMKLS Canyon. Kelly rode Stuart Little for a 78 and Curtis Garton of Calera, Okla., had 74 on Big Mama.

Footing was not good for the steer wrestlers, but Tom White of Hugo really put on a good show, when he matched his dry night of Wednesday's slack, 5.5 with a 5.5 on Thursday to go into the early lead of the event with an 11.0 on two head. Right behind was Dusty Duvall of Checotah, who was the first one to compete Thursday and had a 5.4 on Wednesday, but slid to a 6.0 on Thursday for an 11.4 on two.

Others getting the steer rolled Thursday were Ote Berry of Checotah with a 7.1 to go with his 15.2 on Wednesday for a 22.3 and Russell Schieber of Alva, who was out of the chute too soon, but with a 7.0 plus 10 for 17.0 to go with 12.1 on Wednesday for 29.1.

Tie-down ropers also got quite muddy, when they participated. Billy Hamilton of McAlester, had a 9.0 to go with Wednesday's 9.4 for 18.4 on two to take the early lead. Brock McLemore of Gracemont, Okla., had a 10.6 to go with 8.3 for 18.9 and Stephen Reagor of Tulsa had 10.6 to go with 9.6 for 20.2 as the trio established the early lead in the event.

The team ropers of Todd Markham, Vinita and Ken Bailey of Okmulgee put the best efforts on the board with an 8.1 to go with 7.3 on Wednesday and 15.4 for two head. They were the final two to go in that event and wiped out an early lead posted by the first contestants, Nick Sartain of Yukon and Shannon Frascht of Alva, who had an 8.2 balloon to 13.5 when heeler Frascht nabbed just one hind leg. They had a 6.7 on Wednesday and had to settle for 19.9. Best of the night however went to Shannon Lee of Gotebo and D.J. O'Conner of Blair with a 6.3. They had taken a no time on Wednesday.

Three amateur team ropers finished successfully, looking forward to possibly competition on Saturday. Kevin Krebbs and Justin Krebbs had 7.8, Rick Campbell and Dick Campbell had 10.5 and Tony Christianson-Jeff Frank had 7.4, but only one hind leg settling for a final time of 12.4.

ASHLEY VANHOESEN - Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2005
ASHLEY VANHOESEN was named 2005 Miss Oklahoma Rodeo during the 2005 Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Pageant at Chisholm Trail Expo Center last Saturday. As a result she could not be a contestant in the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen pageant. Others named from Ponca City included Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Sweatheart Rachel Carter, 6, and Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Princess Rachel Ann Smith, 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


45th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo Comes To End
THE 101 WILD WEST RODEO PARADE in downtown Ponca City Saturday morning included the 101 Women's Drill and Grand Entry Team. Large numbers of people crowded along Grand Avenue to watch the parade and participate in the rodeo spirit. Following the parade was a children's rodeo held on the lawns of the library and City Hall. The women's drill team also performed each night of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.
(News Photo by Lela Bouse-McCracken)

Weather Better for Rodeo Finale
Weather certainly had a lot to do with the size of crowds at the 45th annual 101 Wild West Rodeo.

After a downpour two hours prior to Grand Entry on Thursday leaving the arena floor considerably heavy, the possibility of more rain dampened any thoughts of a good crowd that night.

Not having good drying conditions on Friday provided similar, but somewhat better footing for the cowboys and cowgirls, but a northeast wind sent many young folks and parents home following a muddy calf scramble.

However, a perfect day Saturday allowed officials of the Ponca City Rodeo Foundation plenty of time for getting the grounds into shape following Saturday morning's activities downtown including a well attended parade.

And one of the largest Saturday crowds to file into the seating sections got to see some of the best efforts of the cowboys and cowgirls during the third performance of this year's rodeo.

Calf ropers and steer wrestlers alike saw new leaders prevail in their respective events. Not to be outdone, cowgirls in barrel racing posted four placings in the top six! It was a proven test that results when drier conditions allow good times from both horses and contestants by getting better footing.

Brenna Herrington of Bussett, Neb., wowed the crowd in the barrel racing event by tying the leader, Toma Nuffer of Medicine Lodge, Kan., from the Wednesday slack with a 17.74. That earned the two $864.86 each.

Kari Holmes of Spencer on Saturday moved into third place with 17.82 and $665.28, while Deantha Helton of Edmond had 17.94 for fifth and $443.52. Denise Loyd of Haysville, Kan., had an 18.05 to pull into a sixth place tie with Dani Turner, and each got $310.46.

Cowgirls and their horses on Thursday were obviously affected by the very poor, muddy conditions and failed to get any of the money doled out through the Rafter H rodeo producers, according to secretary Shelley Hall.

Jana Wehkamp of Perkins had a 17.88 on Wednesday for fourth and $576.57 while three Friday racers were 8th, 9th and 10th. They included Gretchen Benbenek, Stillwater, 18.08, $177.40; Janae Ward, Addington, 18.30, $133.05 and June Holeman, Arcadia, Neb., 18.32, $88.70.

Calf ropers, including Ponca City's Jerome Schneeberger, welcomed the opportunity to show off in better conditions. Tate Watkins of Alva had an 8.9 for top money in the second go and put that with a first go of 8.4 for tops in the average at 17.3. That was good enough for $1,189.86 in each of his winning spots, plus $594.93 for third in the first go.

Schneeberger, who had an 11.2 on Wednesday in slack, had a 9.1 for third money ($594.93) in the second go Saturday but he finished just out of the money with his 20.3, three-tenths of a second off the fourth place spot.

Donnie Friend of Wyandotte, Okla., had a 9.3 in the second go for $297.46, third money. Billy Hamilton of McAlester on Thursday had a 9.0 in the mud for second money in the second round for $892.39 and got second money (the same amount) in the average at 18.4.

First go calf ropers with winnings beside Watkins were 1. Russell Wells, Lindsey, 7.6 for $1,189.86; 2. Brock McLemore, Gracemont, Okla., 8.3, $892.39 and 4. Hunter Herron, Apache, 8.8 for $297.46. McLemore was third in average with 18.9 for $594.93 and Justin Weichel of Colony had 20.0 on two for fourth, $297.46.

Mike Greenleaf of Kingsdown, Kan., had a 4.4 to tie Shad Sparks on Saturday in the steer wrestling second go-round. The two each go $990.20. Three Friday efforts of 4.8 each by Shane Henderson, Winfield, Kan.; Jule Hazen, Protection, Kan.; and Dale Yerigan of Pryor, got $282.91 each for third place ties.

Hazen was the only one to get into the average and had a 9.8 on two for second $848.74 behind what turned out to be D.P. Luschinger, Atoka, who had 9.3 on two for $1,131.66. Third went to Clay Mindemann, Apache, 10.1 for $565.83 and Tyson Brenton, Rosalia, Kan., was fourth, 10.9 for $282.91.

In the first go, all on Wednesday, Luschinger was first with 3.7 for $1,131.66; Blake Mindemann, Apache, and Marty Musil, Guthrie, tied for second with 4.4s for $707.28 each and Hazen with 5.0 for fourth $282.91.

Saturday's best in bull riding was Winston Kusler of Havre, Mont., with 71 for $494.70 for fourth. Three Friday riders pocketed money, with Lance Bradshaw of Edmond getting first on a 77 score for $1,360.42 while second went to Cody Sundby, Weatherford, Okla., 75 for $1,030.62 and Cody Wood of Weatherford, Texas, had 65 for fifth, $288.57. Steven Clark wowed the crowd Thursday with a 73 but finished third for $742.05.

Weston Ireland of Sallisaw got a 73 in the saddle bronc riding for fifth place at $268.20 and Clayton Ziebell of Wann had a 71 that tied him with Todd Leftwich (Friday) and each got $95.78 for the sixth place tie.

In the mud, Thursday's riders fared better with Cody Demoss of Crowville, La., scoring an 84 for first place $1,264.39 and Lance Kelly, Queensland, Australia, finished second with a 78 for $957.87; and Curtis Garton of Calera, had 74 for fourth $459.78. Bart Franks on Friday had a 75 for third place finish at $689.67.

Saturday's best in the bareback bronc riding was an 80 by Tony Hecksher of Bowie, Texas, and that got him a tie for third with Friday's Jody Wiggins, Hutchinson, and each got $509.25.

Best in bareback riding was Mark Gomes on Friday. The Nickerson, Kan., cowboy earned $1,120.35 on an 85 while Brandon Holmes of Eva, Ala., had an 81 on Thursday for second, $848.75. Two Thursday riders finished in the money included Kelly (bull rider), with 74 for fifth, $237.65 and Chip Dees, Philadelphia, Miss., 71 for $169.75 for sixth.

For some reason, team ropers did not fare well on Saturday. Three teams on Thursday were money winners out of the four. Shannon Lee of Gotebo and D.J. O'Conner of Blair took second go at 6.3 and got $445.87 each while Rickey Armstrong, El Reno and Darrel Radacy of Lookeba had 7.4 as did Friday's Cody McMinn of Caddo Mills, Texas and Kollin Van Ahn, Sac City, Iowa. They each got $278.66 and fourth went to Thursday's Todd Markham, Vinita and Ken Bailey, Okmulgee, on their 8.1 for $111.46 each.

Markham and Bailey had 15.4 on two for first and $445.87 each while Destry Graham, Sallisaw and Stitches Stanley of Rose had a 19.7 and got $334.40 for second. Nick Sartain of Yukon and Shannon Frascht of Alva combined for a 19.9 and $222.93 each while Brannon Ward of Edmond and Jace Crabb of Mangum had 23.7 on two for $111.46 each in fourth place.

Sartain-Frasch got first go winnings of $445.87 on a 6.7; Graham and Stanley was second with 6.9 for $334.40 each and Jon Kreder of Collinsville and Wade Feeney of Broken Arrow had a 7.1 for third and $222.93 each while Markham and Bailey finished fourth with 7.3 for $111.46 each.

Kevin and Justin Krebbs really put on a show for the local team ropers when they had a 7.1 on Saturday night that went with a 7.8 in the earlier running to haul away the saddles provided by the sponsor Kaw Nation Casino. Second went to Matt Garrett and Paul Forman, who had 8.2 to go with 7.6 and 15.6 on two. They each go trophy breast collars donated by Kaw Smoke Shop.

Few Better Times, Scores on Friday
Saturday competitors were going to have to be at their best in the 101 Wild West Rodeo at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena on North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue.

That's because cowgirls and cowboys had posted really good efforts in Wednesday's slack, some high scores in rough stock riding on Thursday and then some really good efforts on Friday as the rodeo moved through its second of three-night performances.

There are some scores and times that could have been beaten Saturday as a result of the 101 Ranch Rodeo Foundation officials worked hard to get the arena floor in tip-top shape following Thursday's rain and Friday's cloudy weather that led to tough efforts by all for the most part.

There were some really good efforts in the heavy mud and some water spots on Thursday, but Friday there were some even better efforts as the dry-out began and had at least provided better footing for steer wrestlers and tie-down (calf) ropers.

Take for instance, the opening event, bareback riding when Mark Gomes of Nickerson, Kan., posted an 85 on Little Joe of the Rafter H stock from Dell Hall's rodeo producing ranch near Tahlequah. That set the stage for the night, after he had bested an 80 of Jody Wiggins, Hutchinson, Kan., also on Friday. Top to that time was the 81 on Thursday by Brandon Holmes of Eva, Ala.

The 4.4 time in slack Thursday on second round activity in steer wrestling remained a top for steer wrestlers, while three 4.8s were recorded Friday night in the arena. They were by Shane Henderson of Winfield, Kan.; Jule Hazen of Protection, Kan.; and Dale Yerigan of Pryor. However, only Hazen's mark went towards being good on two head as he had 5.0 in Wednesday slack and finished with 9.8. But that fell behind the slack leader of E.P. Luchsinger of Atoka, who on Friday had a 5.6 to make his two head total of 9.3.

Saddle bronc riders were not even able to get close to the 83 posted Thursday by Cody DeMoss of Crowville, La. Best on Friday was 75 by Bret Franks of Goodwell on Brown Jug and that left him third behind DeMoss and Lance Kelly of Queensland, Australia, who had 78 on Stuart Little Thursday night in the mud.

Calf ropers did not fare well in Friday competition, until Tommy Eaton of Ada posted a 9.4 to go with slack's performance on Wednesday of 10.7 and a 20.1 finish on two. It may get in the money, depending on how well things went Saturday night. Tops in second go tie-down roping had gone to Billy Hamilton of McAlester with a 9.0 to fit with 9.4 and 18.4 on two while Brock McLemore of Gracemont on Thursday had used a 10.6 to go with slack's best of 8.3 for 18.9 on two. They were the only ones under 10 seconds on two at that time.

Team ropers had a tough time also on Friday with five of the seven teams competing going away with "no time" as announced by popular rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid. Best for the night in team roping came from the effort of Cody McMinn, Caddo Mills, Texas and heeler Kollin Von Ahn, of Sac City, Iowa, who had 7.4 but had no time on slack.

In the local team roping Friday Trenton Tucker and Aaron Waters had 9.4 to lead that parade of hopefuls into Saturday's finals. Derry Owen and Barry Kincaid had 5.1 but only one leg for a 5.0 penalty, amounting to 10.1 and Brad Swan/Jeffrey Swan had 8.4 plus 5 for 13.4. Stan Boyles/Aaron Williams thrilled early efforts with an 11.0 which may be good enough to get into the finals.

Tamara Reinhardt of Canadian, Texas, had 18.32 in the barrel racing effort Friday and that was down the list in that event.

There were two bull riders to get good scores Friday, with Cody Sundby of Weatherford's 75 on Jim Dandy and Lance Bradshaw of Edmond getting a 77 on Killer Bee. Those were better than the 74 posted on Thursday by Steven Clark of Mineral Wells, Texas, on Barstool.

The calf scramble had greater participation Friday as a result of the larger crowd at the Rodeo, but the youngsters paid the price of entering the rather muddy arena, leaving with plenty of muddy shoes.

Mustang Contestant Named Queen
KIMBER CRAIGHEAD, left, was named the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Saturday night during the final 2004 rodeo performance. Lacey Stubblefield, right, Miss Oklahoma Rodeo 2004, assisted with the coronation. Craighead is from Mustang, Okla., and Stubblefield is a native of Enid. (News Photo by Lela Bouse-McCracken)

 

 

Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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