2009

101 Wild West Rodeo

   

 

   

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The 58th Annual 101 Wild West Rodeo

June 8 - 10, 2017

Website will be updated as information becomes available.

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Work Sessions

Work will continue through this year and next on improvements to the 101 Wild West Rodeo Arena, watch here for upcoming dates. Volunteers are always welcome.

   

 

   

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NEW THIS YEAR: Pony Express Relay Race

   

 

 

101 Wild West Rodeo History - 2009

 
 

RODEO DATES: August 6th, 7th, & 8th

 
ANNOUNCER: Lynn Phillips GRAND MARSHAL: Tom Muchmore
RODEO QUEEN: Kelly Bergin SPECIALTY ACT: One-Armed Bandit
RODEO PRINCESS: Madison LeAnn Smith STOCK CONTRACTOR: Andrew's Rodeo Co.

101 Wild West Rodeo Week Schedule of Events


The 101 Wild West Rodeo 50th Anniversary Celebration kicks off at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 5 on Grand Avenue between Fifth and Seventh Street in front of City Hall.

Free charcoaled hamburgers will be available.

John Payne a.k.a. The One Armed Bandit and Barrelman Slim Garner will entertain.

Other events include: Terrapin Derby — Ages (12 and under) $2 entry fee (bring your
own turtle) and Cow Patty Bingo - $5 a square entry fee.

Rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips will emcee the program with special guest speakers Lt. Gov. Jari Askins, Mayor Homer Nicholson, Rep. Ken Luttrell, and Sen. David Myers.

With a dedication of the downtown murals with a special announcement for the next mural project.

101 Wild West Rodeo performances will take place 8 p.m. nightly, Thursday thru Saturday, Aug. 6-8.

A free BBQ dinner will be held Thursday at 6 p.m. Must have rodeo ticket.

A free concert and dance with the Jason Savory Band is set for Aug. 7 and Sat. Aug. 8. at the rodeo grounds immediately following the rodeo performance.

Rodeo parade will be Saturday, Aug. 8, at 10 a.m. at Oak Street to Sixth Street

10th Annual Kid’s Rodeo at the Ponca City Library – Saturday, Aug. 8 at 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. (following the Rodeo Parade).

Outgoing 101 Rodeo Queen Notes Great Time of Reign

This has been a very exciting year for me as your reigning 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen. I have traveled as far as Thackerville, Ok to as near as right here in Ponca City.

Several of this year’s highlights have been Miss Rodeo Oklahoma’s Coronation as well as The Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen and Princess Coronations.

I also enjoyed several rodeos and parades throughout the state. Being a rodeo queen isn’t just about looking pretty on a horse. Being a rodeo queen is a job that entails working to promote the greatest sport on dirt. I have spent the year concentrating on involving and educating youth into the sport of rodeo. Everyone knows that our future lies in the hands of today’s youth. That saying is true for professional rodeo as well. Thank you to today’s professional cowboys for giving us a reason to be here at the rodeo, without the past there would be no future. To all the future contestants, stock contractors, and personnel ... all the hard work and hours will be worth every minute.

I’ve had a wonderful time, and Good luck to this year’s contestants.


Rachael Smith

State Queen, Teen, Princess Here This Week for Rodeo
Plenty of royalty will be on hand for the 101 Wild West Rodeo’s 50th Anniversary. There will be queens, teen miss, and princess. That along with other queen and princess contests makes for quite a lot of gals on horseback in the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena.
Miss Rodeo Oklahoma 2009 is Michaelle Kathleen Blake from Arcadia. She is the 24 year-old daughter of Steve and Kathleen Blake. Michaelle graduated in December 2007 with an animal science degree with an equine production option. She is currently a graduate student at Texas A&M University pursing a Master’s of Science degree in equine reproduction with an emphasis on equine nutrition
specializing in the mare and foal, with plans to graduate in August 2009.

Michaelle plans to continue her education after her reign by obtaining a PhD in equine exercise physiology. While in college, she was on the Texas A&M horse judging team where they were crowned
2005 AQHA World Champions and 2005 Reserve Congress Champions. In her free time, Michaelle enjoys kickboxing and training for triathlons.

Michaelle was crowned Miss Rodeo Oklahoma on August 2, 2008, at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum after a weeklong competition.

She won the categories of appearance, personality, photogenic, speech, written test, and horsemanship. Michaelle will spend the year traveling the state of Oklahoma and our nation promoting and supporting the sport of rodeo, our western heritage, and our western way of life.

Kallie Sue Baker, representing the Enid Stampede Rodeo, was selected to reign as the 2009 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Teen on August 2, 2008 in Oklahoma City. Kallie was chosen from a field of five outstanding contestants who competed in horsemanship, interviews, modeling, impromptu questions, and speech during the three day competition. She will travel throughout Oklahoma representing rodeo.


Kallie is the 19-year-old daughter of Ronnie and Karen Baker. She enjoys barrel racing and pole bending in the Heart of Oklahoma Youth Rodeo Association and is an active member of the American Quarter Horse Youth Association, competing in ranch sorting. Kallie is a senior at Mustang High School where she is a member of the National Honor Society and FFA, and she is taking courses at Redlands Community College.


She will be attending Southwestern Oklahoma State University in the fall where she will major in marketing.

Kallie will receive a $500 scholarship from the Oklahoma Rodeo Pageants Council, Inc. at the end of her reign.

Other prizes include: a traveling crown; traveling chaps from Leather, etc.; trophy saddle; trophy buckle; and a Serratelli hat from Langston’s Western Wear. Kallie won the categories of Personality, Appearance, Photogenic and Written Test.

Kylie Myers-Bogart representing the Canadian Valley Rangerette Drill Team as their Princess won the title of 2009 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Princess on August 2, 2008.

Kylie was chosen from a field of seven contestants who competed in horsemanship, interviews, modeling, impromptu questions and speech. Kylie won the categories of Appearance, Personality, and Photogenics.

Kylie will be traveling throughout Oklahoma representing the sport of rodeo.

Kylie is the 12-year-old daughter of Toby Bogart of Oklahoma City and Marcie Harding of Moore. Kylie enjoys barrel racing, pole bending, and goat tying at the Heart of Oklahoma Youth Rodeo Association. She also competes at the State 4-H Horse show where she has won the state title for the past two years in barrels. She also won the 2008 State Pole Bending Champion. Kylie rides with the Canadian Valley Rangerettes Youth team and rode with two-time USDEC National Champions Canadian Valley Rangerettes to win the Red Dirt Ride 2008.

Kylie future plan is to attend Oklahoma State University and major in Veterinary Science.

Youngsters Have Opportunity At Tenth Annual Kid’s Rodeo
All you rootin’ tootin’ cowboys and cowgirls are invited to come join the fun at the eighth annual kid’s rodeo to be held right after the parade, approximately at 11 a.m. Saturday, on the lawn of the Ponca City Library.

Events will include:
  • In The Street (Grand Avenue)

Music by Don Long and the “Longshot Gang” sponsored by ConocoPhillips, 11 am until 12:30 pm
Native American Dancers sponsored by ConocoPhillips, 11:30 am

On-going events on the Library and Civic Center Lawns:

Hoppy Horse Corral sponsored by ConocoPhillips,
Stick Horse Flag Race sponsored by the Library,
Musical Hay Bales sponsored by Friends of the Library,
Money in the Hay sponsored by Eastman National Bank.

Also, there’s Horse Beanbag Toss sponsored by Friends of the Library, Rodeo Queens Autographs sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation, Pony Rides sponsored by the 101 Rodeo Foundation.

Oh yes, there’s the Dummy Roping sponsored by the Library, Face Branding sponsored by Friends of the Library, Cactus Hat Throw sponsored by ConocoPhillips.

And there will be a Book Sale sponsored by Friends of the Library (lots of children’s books). The 101 Ranch Picture Display sponsored by 101 Ranch Collectors will be available and Children’s
Fingerprinting at the corner of Fifth Street and Grand Avenue.

Drinks and Ice are furnished by: Wal-Green’s and Ponca Ice Company.
 

Andrews Rodeo Company Brings Top Animals Here
Again this year the rodeo will be produced by Andrew’s Rodeo Company of Addielou, Texas – Sammy Andrews was introduced to rodeo at a young age. He is the son of B.D. Andrews who was a PRCA Stock Contractor in the forties and fifties. Sammy started producing amateur rodeos in 1980 and received his PRCA Card in 1987. James Andrews, son of Sammy Andrews, is a third generation of Rodeo and shares the responsibilities of producing outstanding Rodeos and award winning Breeding Program at the Andrews Ranch.

Andrews was nominated as Stock Contractor of the Year 2000, 2002, and 2004 by PRCA members. Sammy was selected as Stock Contractor of the Year 2002. Stock recognized by PRCA such as 1990 Runner-up Bull of the Year and 1991 Bucking Bull of the Year, Skoal’s Outlaw Willie. Skat Kat was Bucking Bull of the NFR 1996, 1998, and Runnerup Bull of the Year in 1999. In 2000 Omalene was the Runner-up NFR Bareback Horse, 2001 Roly Poly was Runner-up Horse of the Year and Bareback Horse of the NFR finals, and in 2004 he was Bareback Horse of the National Finals.

In the Year 2003, Omaha Tour Finals, Big Time was selected Bull of the Finals; at the 2003 Dallas Tour Finals, Wild Weed was selected as Bull of the Finals. And a new young bull Cat Daddy was selected as Bull of the Finals at the 2004 Winter Finals in Las Vegas. At the 2004 Texas Circuit Finals, Roly Poly was selected as Bareback Horse of the Year and Erksme was selected as Bull of the Year. 2005 San Antonio began recognizing top ranked stock performance during the San Antonio Rodeo. Andrews bull Cat Daddy walked away with the check and recognition for the bull of the event and in 2006 Fender Bender received the honor, Thanks to San Antonio. Cat Daddy was voted Runner-Up Bull of the Year 2005. Texas Circuit Finals for 2005, Roly Polly 2nd bare back horse, Broncs Faded Star 3rd, in the Bulls Cat Daddy received Bull of the year with Rompus and Erksme tying for 2nd and 3rd. Year 2006 Fender Bender received the honor of runner up PRCA BULL of the Year, Texas Circuit Finals Bull of The Year. Rompus was 2nd Bull of the year Texas Circuit Finals.

Andrew’s ability to produce quality stock is well noted with 1999 Hall of Fame Bucking Bull, BODACIOUS, with 135 outs and only 8 qualified rides. Bodacious won Bucking Bull of the Year 1994, 1995, and Bucking Bull of the NFR 1992, 1994, and 1995. Son of Bodacious, Bo Dipping, began taking the spotlight in the Rodeo Circuit. He was awarded Rankest Bull Summer Finals in Dallas 2001 and 2002.

Sports Illustrated followed his career with an article in June 2003. Ft. Worth Star Telegram and Dallas Morning News visited the Andrews Ranch summer 2003 publishing a full-page article on Sammy and Bo Dipping. In 2004, Outdoor Life visited the Andrews Ranch and aired a documentary called FEARLESS BODACIOUS. Houston Rodeo and Livestock Show honored Sammy during the year 2004 awarding him with a bucking chute to use as a memorial for Bo’s grave. ESPN has recently visited the Andrews Ranch and aired an insert of Sammy and Bodacious throughout the telecast of the 2005 NFR displaying the much-appreciated bucking chute.

The greatest pride came when the fourth generation of the Andrews Rodeo Co. Summer Andrews at the young age of five, displayed the Texas Flag during the Saturday night performance of the 2004 Texas Stampede in Dallas, Texas. Summer and Savana Waller often display the American Flag, riding their ponies during the National Anthem. Everyone loves a youngster on a pony.

Andrews Rodeo Co. takes pride in producing bucking bulls from rodeo legends. These include many of the rankest bucking bulls in rodeo history, such as: BODACIOUS, Skat Kat, Tumble Weed, Wild Toad, Super Dave, and Erkel. The sons of these legends that are now being produced by Andrews Rodeo Co. are Bo’s Excuse, Fender Bender, Erksme, Wild Weed, Little Weed, Jim Dipping, Rena’s Pet, Red Onion, and Rocking Synde The knowledge gained from a lifetime of Rodeo experience, including founding and operating Andrews Rodeo Co., has given Andrews the opportunity to represent the Stock Contractors on the Executive Council of the PRCA for the past eight years. Andrews Ranch is located in Addielou, Texas where Sammy and his wife Rena make their home.

Sammy and his son James along with his family, wife Pepper and their children Summer, Kelon, and Alley continue producing outstanding rodeos with stock from their award winning breeding program.

It’s 50th Anniversary Time for 101 Rodeo

Starting Rodeo Week off this year will be the 101 Wild West Rodeo 50th Anniversary Celebration on Wednesday, on Grand Avenue between Fifth and Seventh Street in front of City Hall (bring your own lawn chairs) from 7-9 p.m. There will be free charcoaled hamburgers and fixings. Entertainment will be provided by the John Payne a.k.a. The One Armed Bandit and Barrelman Slim Garner.

A Terrapin Derby (bring your own turtle) will be held at the intersection of Fifth and Grand and Cow Patty Bingo will be available at the intersection of Sixth and Grand. Rodeo announcer Dr. Lynn Phillips will emcee the program with special guest speakers Lt. Governor Jari Askins, Mayor Homer Nicholson, Rep. Ken Luttrell, and Sen. David Myers.


Dedication of the Downtown Murals with a special announcement for the next mural project.

Dates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo this year will be Aug, 6-8, with performances at 8 p.m. nightly.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo will be held at the 101 Ranch Rodeo Arena, located on West Prospect Avenue at North Ash Street. Beautification efforts of the arena parking lot have changed entrance roads to the parking lot areas, to Ash Street and to West Prospect Avenue. The new substation has taken up the space that had been used as an entryway, at the corner of Ash Street and Prospect Avenue.

The 2009 Rodeo will mark the 50th running of the rodeo honoring what historians have described as the birthplace of rodeo — the once mighty 101 Ranch.

The fabulous 101 Ranch, with a 50-year history both rich and tragic, influenced Oklahoma and agriculture like no other ranching operation in the world.

The 101 Ranch, established by Col. George W. Miller in 1879 on the banks of the Salt Fork River southwest of what is now Ponca City, began with thousands of acres of land which Miller both leased and purchased from his friends — the Ponca, Tonkawa and Osage tribes.

The Colonel, who died in 1903 at the age of 61, and the ranch, which was already successful came into the capable hands of his sons, George, Joe and Zack.

It was 1905 when the Millers offered to perform what they called a “round-up” or “buffalo chase” as an entertainment for a National Editorial Association convention. Visitors were said to come to the ranch in 30 regular and special trains, and the crowd estimated at nearly 60,000 was thrilled to the exhibition of cowboys recreating real life ranch work from bronc riding and roping to Tom Mix’s debut as a roper and rider.

After years of success as the “101 Ranch Real Wild West and Great Far East Show” things at the ranch began to crumble in the late 1920s, due to the deaths of Joe in 1927 and George in 1929.

But the rodeo returned to the Ponca City scene, when the Ponca City Cherokee Strip Rodeo Committee came up with the idea of having a rodeo during the Cherokee Strip Celebration in September 1960. By 1962 the financial success of the Cherokee Strip Rodeo proved that people wanted the return of a show similar to the 101 Ranch Wild West Show. The present bleachers were constructed in 1962, however additional improvement in chute heaven, the press box, and the new left and right release chutes have made the rodeo arena a top notch attraction.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation headed by Larry Goodno, in his ninth year as president, contracts with a number of interesting one act exhibitions for the threenight stand. Other foundation officers include Gary Parli as vice president; Darleanna Wamecke as secretary and Shawndra Sheik as treasurer.

Are you tough enough to wear pink? The 101 Wild West Rodeo will continue the tradition with the implementation of a Tough Enough To Wear Pink? Night. Thursday evening’s performance will be designated as “Pink Night”. The color pink is not something you would usually associate with the tough sport of rodeo; however, breast cancer has touched the lives of many rodeo and western lifestyle families. Rodeo committees, western event producers and western manufacturers have joined together to raise awareness and funds for the fight against breast cancer.

The TETWP campaign puts this important health issue top-of-mind at rodeos and western events across America and Canada. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation which organizes and puts on the 101 Wild West Rodeo is pleased to join those who have already gotten behind this campaign and the momentum continues to build.

At Thursday’s performance, the foundation will give $1 for each person in the audience who is wearing pink and $50 for each event winner who is wearing pink to the Breast Cancer Assistance Program
Fund out of Tulsa.

Thursday will also be Community Appreciation night. Come out early and enjoy a free barbeque dinner with ticket purchase from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on the east-side of the rodeo grounds.

On Friday and Saturday there will be a live concert and dance with “The Jason Savory Band” immediately following each night’s Rodeo Performance on the east-side of the arena. Meet the cowboys and contract personnel, visit with some old friends or maybe make some new ones.

Back again to the rodeo this year and sure to be a crowd pleaser is the 101 Women’s Drill and Grand Entry Team. Organized by Janie Campbell, this array of talented and spirited women is kicking off the grand entry each night. They will be displaying talented horsemanship in flag bearing and synchronized routines.

Dr. Lynn Phillips will return to announce the rodeo. Dr. Phillips has become a regular at the 101, providing exciting and entertaining commentary.

This year’s rodeo is again being produced by Andrew’s Rodeo Company of Addielou, Texas, promises to be greater than ever with an excellent lineup of contestants, specialty acts, bull fighters, and stock. Andrew’s Rodeo Company has become quite popular with the rodeo associations and cowboys, providing stock for a three-night plus slack rodeo.

Andrew’s ability to produce quality stock is well noted with 1999 Hall of Fame Bucking Bull, BODACIOUS, with 135 outs and only 8 qualified rides. Bodacious won Bucking Bull of the Year 1994, 1995, and Bucking Bull of the NFR 1992, 1994, and 1995. Son of Bodacious, Bo Dipping, began taking the spotlight in the Rodeo Circuit. He was awarded Rankest Bull Summer Finals in Dallas 2001 and 2002. Sports Illustrated followed his career with an article in June 2003. Fort Worth Star Telegram and Dallas Morning News visited the Andrews Ranch summer 2003 publishing a full-page article on Sammy and BoDipping.

In 2004, Outdoor Life visited the Andrews Ranch and aired a documentary called FEARLESS BODACIOUS. Houston Rodeo and Livestock Show honored Sammy during the year 2004 awarding him with a bucking chute to use as a memorial for Bo’s grave. ESPN has recently visited the Andrews Ranch and aired an insert of Sammy and Bodacious throughout the telecast of the 2005 NFR displaying the much-appreciated bucking chute.

Serving as Barrelman this year is Jeff “SLIM” Garner. With a 2000-pound bull bearing down on you, it helps to have a sense of humor. It also helps to have a barrel to hide in. Jeff Garner is a second-generation clown, who started clowning around when he was 17 years old. Jeff has a arge variety of rodeo acts to keep the crowds entertained. Anything that is loud and can catch people’s attentions is what he likes. Jeff gets a huge thrill just stepping into the rodeo arena. He loves what he does and he’s living out his dream performing in the middle of rodeo arenas.

The Bullfighters will be Wacey Munsell returning to the Ponca City Rodeo scene and for the first time here in Ponca City will be Bullfighter Jeremy Muntz.

This year’s specialty act will be John Payne — The One-Armed Bandit ... this act has been awarded PRCA Specialty Act of the Year in 1989-90- 91-92-93-94-95-96 and 2008 and is always a crowd pleaser in Ponca City.

Take an Oklahoma horseman, two dogs and a whip. Add a herd of buffalo, mustangs or longhorn cattle right off the range. Now round ‘em up, and put them ON, that’s right, on, not IN, your trailer.

Since first appearing at the 101 Wild West Rodeo in 1988, the One Armed Bandit & Company has appeared in 1993, 1996, 2000, 2003, and 2006. So you see it just doesn’t seem right without The One Armed Bandit & Company being here to be a part of the 50th Anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

The official crowning of the 101 Rodeo Queen is immediately following the Grand Entry at the Saturday night performance.

Reigning queen, Rachael Smith of Ponca City, will hand over her authentic hand beaded 101 Wild West Rodeo crown. Audiences will have many opportunities to meet and greet queens at each nightly performance.

“Rodeo Week” in Ponca City is celebrated with several exciting activities in the Ponca City areas including a parade downtown along Grand Avenue on Saturday morning. Grand Marshal this year is Tom Muchmore, Editor/Publisher of The Ponca City News. The parade which starts at 10 a.m. is immediately followed by the annual Kids Rodeo held in front of the Ponca City Library located at the east end of Grand Avenue. The Kids Rodeo has become an exciting tradition of the parade offering kids the opportunity to meet queens, visit rodeo clowns, and get up close to rodeo affiliated livestock.

Horse rides, goat tail tying, and stick horse barrel races are just a sample of the fun activities slated for the kids.

The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation, its 16 board members, and numerous supporters, invites everyone to attend this year’s rodeo. “Family Night” is Thursday with adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, & kids ages 12 & under FREE. Friday and Saturday performances are adults just $8 in advance, $10 at the gate, kids ages 7-12 $5, & kids ages 6 & under FREE, or buy a weekend pass and enjoy all 3 nights for $20. Advanced tickets can be found at select local businesses.

Are You Tough Enough To Wear Pink Thursday?
Are you tough enough to wear pink? The 101 Wild West Rodeo will continue the new tradition with the implementation of a Tough Enough To Wear Pink? night. Thursday evening’s performance will be designated as “Pink Night”. The color pink is not something you would usually associate with the tough sport of rodeo; however, breast cancer has touched the lives of many rodeo and western lifestyle families. Rodeo committees, western event producers and western manufacturers have joined together to raise awareness and funds for the fight against breast cancer.

The TETWP campaign puts this important health issue top-of-mind at rodeos and western events across America and Canada. The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation which organizes and puts on the 101 Wild West Rodeo is pleased to join those who have already gotten behind this campaign and the momentum continues to build.

At Thursday’s performance, the foundation will give $1 for each person in the audience who is wearing pink and $50 for each event winner who is wearing pink to the Breast Cancer Assistance Program Fund out of Tulsa.

Lieutenant Governor Featured Speaker at 101 Rodeo Picnic
This year the 101 Rodeo Foundations is conducting a special community celebration in honor of the 50th Anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo. The rodeo named after the famous 101 Ranch Round-Up was established in 1959 and takes place at the rodeo grounds on Ash Street in the industrial park area each August.

To celebrate the history of the event a free community picnic will be offered on the lawn of the City Hall, Wednesday at 7 p.m. Hamburgers by Danny Head of Head Country will be served to the first 1,500 visitors. Homemade ice cream and pop will also be available for sale.

Free entertainment will include John Payne, the One Arm Bandit and Slim Garner, rodeo clown, both of 101 Wild West Rodeo fame.

In addition to the more common rodeo entertainers will be the simulation of the original 101 Ranch Terrapin Derby of the 1920’s hosted by the 101 Ranch Old Timers Assoc. at the intersection of Fifth and Grand Avenue. Entrants are asked to provide their own terrapin (alligator turtles are not permitted) and pay a $2 entry fee. Trophies, ribbons and rodeo ticket prizes will be awarded to the 1st, 2nd, and
3rd place winners. Registration for the derby will begin at 6:30 p.m.

The high school FFA group will host a Cow Chip Bingo contest. Chances will be available for $5 a ticket at the intersection of Sixth and Grand Avenue.

Guest speakers for the evening’s festivities will include emcee, Dr. Lynn Phillips, professional rodeo announcer from Enid, Mayor Homer Nicholson, Oklahoma State Rep. Ken Luttrell, Oklahoma State Sen. David Myers and Oklahoma Lt. Gov. Jari Askins.

Rodeo queens and princess will make an appearance selling rodeo tickets for the week. The 101 Ranch Rodeo will take place the following night extending through Saturday at the 101 Ranch Rodeo grounds, located off North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue.

With the help of the lieutenant governor, the Downtown Mural Committee will dedicate the Arcade and Santa Fe Depot and Train Murals painted this past year. During the presentation the committee will also launch a fundraising drive for a new mural of the 101 Ranch and Wild West Show to be painted on the old Nonamaker building at 205 West Grand this fall. Ponca City Main Street will conduct a COOKSHACK smoker donation booth donated by owner Stewart Powell at the event to raise needed funding for the mural project.

For more information regarding the event or the 101 Wild West Rodeo, call Brad Beaty, special projects coordinator for the Rodeo Foundation, at 580-761-0167.

101 Wild West Rodeo Queen Competition for Historic Title
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen’s Competition continues to attract top-notch horsewomen for the honor of serving as the historic rodeo queen.

This year, there are seven contestants for the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen. They include Kelly Bergin, Cheyene Bergman, Kelbi Ann Campbell, Malory Lynn Scott, Destiny Shelton, Rebecca Jo Nester, and Tara Wilde.
 
Introducing.....Kelly Bergin
Kelly Bergin is the seventeen year old daughter of Chris Bergin and Melinda Barr of Oklahoma City. She is a junior at Classen School of Advanced Studies where she is a member of the competitive debate team. Kelly has been riding drill for three years, and currently both rides and coaches with the Bridle Path 4H drill team of Canadian County.


She and her horse Bandit also run barrels, poles, and anything else that they can try.

Introducing.....Cheyene Bergman
Cheyene Bergman is the sixteen year old daughter of Wanda and Robbie Bergman of Newkirk Oklahoma.

Cheyene will be a junior at Newkirk High School. She is involved in basketball, track, 4H, an active member of St. Francis Catholic Church, and will be the 2009-2010 president of the Newkirk FFA Chapter.

She enjoys riding horses and being outside. With future plans of becoming a vet she enjoys helping her family with looking after their cow calf operation.
Introducing.....Kelbi Ann Campbell
Kelbi Ann Campbell is the eighteen year old daughter of Dick and Revalee Campbell of Blackwell, Oklahoma.


She attended Peckham schools from kindergarten till the eighth grade, and then she attended Blackwell High School where she is a graduate of 2009. While in high school she was on the honor role all four years of high school, she served as the Chaplin for the Blackwell FFA chapter and was a member of the pep club, she also enjoyed playing basketball and softball.

Kelbi doesn’t have much of a rodeo background other than going with her dad when she was much younger; Kelbi does however ride in the Kay County Free Fair and have been since she was two.

Her future plans are to attend Oklahoma State University, where she will obtain a double major for Agricultural Education and Animal Science. Kelbi would like to receive her degrees and start teaching soon after, and then start a family!!

Introducing.....Rebecca Jo Nester
Rebecca Jo Nester is the fourteen year old daughter of Joe and Teri Nester of Ponca City. And she has an older sister named Jessica.

Rebecca has been riding horses most of my life, and she and her family owns 15 horses. Her two geldings are named Ace and Bo. She has had Ace since he was born; he is a 4 year old Tri/Tobiano Pinto. She recently got Bo June of this year. Bo is a 6 year old Palomino AQHA that her dad got for her. She enjoys competing and showing. Rebecca’s first title as royalty was Marland Round-Up Club 2008 Princess.

Rebecca loves to ride and enjoys trail riding and frequent rides to the river. When she’s not riding, she either reads, hangs out with her friends or is working.
 
Introducing.....Malory Lynn Scott
Malory Lynn Scott is the 14 year old daughter of Gary & Tonya Scott of Newkirk.

Malory will be entering the 9th grade at Newkirk High School this year, and is active in 4-H and FFA where she shows pigs and cattle; Malory is also active in the Kay County 4-H Teen Leaders. Malory enjoys the theatre, and recently performed in the Ponca Playhouse production of “Fiddler on the Roof’.

While acting is her passion, she is interested in pursuing a career in medicine or science. Malory enjoys listening to music, singing, and attending local school events with friends.

Her horse, Buzz, is a 7 year old sorrel over paint gelding. Malory’s favorite rodeo sport is bull riding.
Introducing.....Destiny Shelton
Destiny Shelton is the 14 year old daughter of Tommy and Alice Shelton. She proudly hangs her hat in the small town of Colcord, Okla. Destiny is excited to attend Colcord High school next year where she will be a freshman. She is an honor student and one day wants to become a veterinarian scientist.

She enjoys job shadowing at the vets office, barrel racing, queening, and meeting new friends. Destiny hopes to win Miss 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen because she believes it would influence other young girls to dream big and would be a great honor to represent the PRCA throughout Oklahoma.
Introducing.....Tara Wilde
Tara Wilde is the 20 year old daughter of Pat and Patti Wilde of Ponca City. And is a 2007 Graduate of Ponca City Senior High School.

Over the last 6 years she has competed in numerous events in the sport of Rodeo.

In 2003 she won the winter series Team Penning Jackpot at the Play Pen Arena. In 2004 she was crowned the Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Queen, and also in 2004 she won the Champion Pole Bending title in the Oklahoma Junior Rodeo Association (O.J.R.A.) and second place in Barrel Racing. In 2005 she was also Champion Pole Bender in the O.J.R.A. In 2006 she was Champion Header in Team roping at the 60th annual Cavalcade in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. For The last year she has been a member of the Women’s Ranch Rodeo Association.

Since 2003 she has been a member of the 101 Women’s Grand Entry Team.

Tara has worked for Osage Feed and Tack for the last 2 years and in her spare time she rides and trains horses for other people. She is currently taking an online Equine Management Course.

Tara has loved the sport of rodeo since she was a little girl and will continue to compete and be a part of the sport for as long as she can.

Many ‘Thanks’ for Sponsorship Individuals and Groups for 101 Queen
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation expresses a sincere “thanks” to the following individuals, firms, and organizations who have contributed to the success of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen contest.


Queen’s Saddle…..Osage Million Dollar Elm Casino
Queen’s Buckle…..Blanton Chiropractic, Dr. Tim & Echo Blanton
Queen’s Traveling Chaps…..Leather, etc., Joyce Crouch
$400 in Gift Certificates…..Ponca City Rodeo Foundation
Queen’s Head Stall & Breast Collar…..Garroutte Products
Hand-Woven Saddle Blanket…..Tres Hermanas Wool Works
First Runner-up: Sterling Silver Bracelet…..Nga Ly Wells, State Farm Insurance
First Runner-up: Wool Blanket w/Engraved Leather…..Laser Mills & Garroutte Products
Horsemanship Winner: Handmade Leather Breast Collar…..Beaver Express - Independent Contractors - Ponca City
Ticket Sales Winner: Leather Weekender Bag…..Darling Companies
Miss Congeniality: Leather, Hairon Day Planner…..Osage Feed & Tack
Speech Winner: Leather Pillow…..Dennis Schneeberger Custom Mowing
Contestant’s Flowers…..Carriage House Flowers
Queen’s Sashes…..Creative Monogramming

Board of Directors Put Rodeo All Together As They Seek Title of ‘Rodeo of the Year’
The Ponca City Rodeo Foundation board of directors put in a lot of time on the road as well as in session for getting the best rodeo in the state, as well as the Prairie Circuit, for which is a coveted title “Rodeo of the Year.”

That opportunity comes from the outstanding group of board of directors, including Larry Goodno, Chairman; Gary Parli, Vice Chairman; Darleanna Warnecke, Secretary and Shawndra Sheik,
Treasurer.

Then there’s others with important committee responsibility, including Brad Beaty/Steve Peresko, Sponsorship; Raymond Ball/Darrel Dye, Promotions; Robin Carpenter/Hank Hainsinger, Events;
Shannon Chambers/George Pease, Concessions; Tyson Morton/Scott Burries, Grounds; Dr. Tim Blanton/Steve Powell, Contract Personal.

The board also has some important members from years ago, including Honorary Lifetime Members, Bethel Freeman, John Heinze, Harold Horton and Lois Scott.

Specialty Act: John Payne, A.K.A. The One-Armed Bandit
Taken from The Ponca City News written in August of 1988 — “John Payne from Shidler entertained the crowd with his trained horse and dog giving a demonstration of herding techniques with several steers. The high point of the act, known as the One-Arm Bandit & Company, was when the dog drove the steers to the top of Payne’s customized trailer, Payne rode his horse onto the trailer with the cattle, and then he got up into his saddle and waved his hat to the crowd”.

Since that time The One Armed Bandit & Company has appeared at the 101 Wild West Rodeo in 1993, 1996, 2000, 2003, and 2006. So you see it just doesn’t seem right without The One Armed Bandit & Company being here to be a part of the 50th Anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Take an Oklahoma horseman, two dogs and a whip. Add a herd of buffalo, mustangs or longhorn cattle right off the range. Now round ’em up, and put them ON, that’s right, on, not IN, your trailer.

The One Arm Bandit & Company have been doing all of that and more with wild west flair since 1988 at major rodeos, shows, and fairs. This act is the only one like it in the world. It truly is a “must see to believe”.

Born to a rancher in 1953, this Oklahoma cowboy has spent his entire life on a back of the horse, with dogs along side. The breed Florida cur head dogs. Which he raises and trains himself, can trail and bayed, the meanest bovine in the woods or plains! Cattle gathering expeditions have taken John as far south as Southern Florida, where alligators lay and wait for hot, thirsty dogs to come to the water’s edge, to Georgia, where large timber companies like Weyerhaeuser harbor maverick cattle in brush and vines so thick that is almost impossible to walk in, much less ride a horse. Then to New Mexico, the west coast of California and the vast plains of the Kansas Flint hills, where fattened cattle are gathered for market, sometimes weighing in excess of 1,100 pounds and proving to be a real pain to handle. And, of course, his native state of Oklahoma, where he has been in partnership with his dad and four brothers for the past 45 years.

On June 12, 1973, John took the place of an electrician for one day, thinking the electricity was off. John sustained 7,200 volts for 10 seconds. The electricity exited his abdomen, leaving intestines showing. While the voltage was destroying his leg muscle, it burnt through his fingers, allowing John to fall to his death. But John received CPR, licked his wounds for two months and went back to ranching, through this shocking experience; John became ... John S. Payne a.k.a. “The Notorious One Arm Bandit”.

Discovered on a ranch in Oklahoma by Walter Alsbaugh, John was hired to pen some bucking bulls that Walter had bought. The bulls didn’t seem to know any boundaries, nor would they respect a cowboy on horse. But after a short while, they learned to respect John’s Cur head dogs. They were penned and Walter was Very much impressed with John’s talent. This led to John’s appearance in the
rodeo arena.

In 1975, John took a liking to Judy C. Crabtree, and they later married.

On January 8, 1976, David L. Payne “LYNN” was born. Lynn learned to be a cowboy early in life. He rides a multitude of horseflesh popping a bullwhip in each hand while steering his horse with his legs. He has been spotted in Canada and the lower 48 states. Lynn has been on the run since the early 90s, when his name appeared on the most wanted list.

On May 2, 1978, Amanda J. Payne was born. Quickly picking up the cowboy life style, she started riding horses at a very early age. Amanda hit the road at the age of 18, traveling back and forth to North America. She has proven a woman can catch a fish and skin a deer just as well as any man. Don’t let her smile fool you . . . she is just as captive as the men in the gang.

She’s the only girl to ever attempt to follow in the Bandits footsteps. Don’t let your guard down either. She can handle two bullwhips at the same time while guiding her horse with legs and her Cur Head Dogs are always watching you. If you’re lucky you might get a glimpse of her. She too is on the most wanted list . . .Together John and Judy are responsible for what now is the most sought after gang in
the rodeo world today—the One Arm Bandit Gang. They have been on the most wanted list since 1988.

The One Arm Bandit and Company has now taken their legendary act throughout the United States and Canada. This act has been seen at some of the top horse shows and rodeos. This entertainment has been awarded PRCA Specialty Act of the Year in 1989-90-91-92-93-94-95-96 and 2008.

The News Editor-Publisher To Be ‘101’ Grand Marshal
This year, the 101 Wild West Rodeo Parade will have as it’s Grand Marshal, the Editor-Publisher of The Ponca City News. Following are some remembrances of Muchmore, recalled when contacted to the this year’s parade marshal.

“I am honored to be selected as Parade Marshal for the 50th Anniversary 101 Wild West Rodeo. It doesn’t seem that long ago that I worked with my father, Allan Muchmore, who was president of the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce as he coordinated the efforts for the first modern day rodeo in 1960.

“The secret that year and every year since has been the dedicated work of many volunteers and help from businesses and ranchers throughout the area.

“Although most of the group had no idea how to put on a rodeo but they believed it would be good for Ponca City and Kay County and they bent to the task of learning how and making it happen. That
group laid the ground work for what is now one of the premier events in our area.

“My brothers and I helped as much as we could at the time but we marveled at the abilities and tenacity of those who were making things happen. Whenever a certain ability or special knowledge was
needed, someone knew someone who could handle the situation.

“The organizers did misjudge the popularity of the rodeo however. I recall watching my father with some trepidation as he waded out into a crowd of very unhappy people who had tickets that first night
but couldn’t get in because the seating was filled. He offered refunds and promised everyone that their tickets were good for any of the three performances. It turned out they needed to add a fourth performance on Monday to accommodate everyone. I was proud of the way he worked with the crowd to calm a potentially bad situation.

“So many other memories crowd in. Jimmie Adams the thrilling Roman Rider and Bill O’Connor the announcer. We had fun selling programs and running errands for whomever needed them. It was an
exciting time for all of us.

“Lastly, I remember being thrilled to meet James Garner, the Grand Marshall that year. He was as nice and down to earth as anyone could hope. He participated in everything he was asked to attend and
always had time for those who came to see him. A class act all the way around.

“Little did I realize the rodeo would become the permanent event that it has. Those who worked so hard had the vision and the desire to make it happen and they would be more than pleased with the result,” Muchmore concluded.

The President of the 101 Rodeo
When the 101 Wild West Rodeo began 50 years ago the founders’ goal was to create an event that would bring area residents together to enjoy a true rodeo experience.

The passing of fifty years has seen a few changes to our area. But our 101 Wild West Rodeo is still thriving despite these changes. This is due to the careful guidance and dedicated effort given by rodeo foundation volunteers. Each deserves our thanks.

Thanks also goes to the community support we’ve generously received from businesses — some of which have been supporting this event since the beginning — through the sponsorship of Chute Heaven seats and box seats, advertising, adding money for event purses, and, of course, through countless donations of goods and services.

But you, our rodeo fans, are the reason why the cowboys and cowgirls drive hundreds of miles to compete and area volunteers donate thousands and thousands of man-hours in labor and a small fortune in materials. Producing a memorable athletic event that keeps you coming back for more is the reason why we’re here.

Without the support of the communities and businesses and, especially, you we could not be celebrating the 101 Wild West Rodeo’s golden anniversary. Everyone on the 101 Rodeo Foundation truly appreciates all the support that is so generously given.

We feel that we have a special 50th Anniversary event planned for all. So, let’s sit back and enjoy a real Wild West time!

Also, check out our brand new Web site. It is packed with history and photographs from the past 50 years. Visit it at www.101WildWestRodeo.com

With gratitude,
Larry Goodno, President
101 Rodeo Foundation

Enjoy Barbeque Thursday Night
Thursday will also be Community Appreciation night come out early and enjoy a free barbeque dinner with ticket purchase from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the tent on the east-side of the rodeo grounds.

Barrelman Delights Fans
With a 2000-pound bull bearing down on you, it helps to have a sense of humor. It also helps to have a barrel to hide in.

Jeff Garner is a second-generation clown, who started clowning around when he was 17 years old. He has been traveling coast to coast for the past 10 year’s full time, but has been a rodeo clown for a
total of 15 years.

He obtained his Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association card in 2000, and he has been traveling to 25 to 35 rodeos a year. Jeff has a large variety of rodeo acts to keep the crowds entertained. Anything that is loud and can catch people’s attentions is what he likes.

Jeff took some time off from rodeo clowning to go to college. He went to college at Garden City Community College in Garden City, Kan. He obtained his associates degree in animal science while he was there. He came to miss the rodeo arena, and found out where his true passions lie, and that was in entertaining people.

Jeff likes to ride horses, rope, and help his dad on the ranch in his spare time. He also likes to see what other inventions he can come up with so that his rodeo acts can be better and the crowd will always be entertained. Jeff gets a huge thrill just stepping into the rodeo arena. He loves what he does and he’s living out his dream performing in the middle of rodeo arenas.

Third Generation Bullfighter Here This Week at 101 Wild West Rodeo
It seems almost natural that Wacey Munsell become a bullfighter, as he is a 3rd generation bullfighter following in the steps of his granddad, father and uncle. Wacey has honed his bullfighting skills almost from the time he could walk using practically anything that he could make an imaginary bull out of; the dogs, a ram, a goat, and swing sets. Those imaginary bulls have now become the real thing.

At 22 years old he already has 9 years of experience fighting bulls at rodeos across the Midwest. In 2004 Wacey was the youngest ever to be allowed on the Two Bulls Professional Bullfighters tour and the World Championship Rodeo Bullfighting tour. Not only did he join the tour he ended up the 2004 World Champion!

In October 2004 he won the finals of the world championship rodeo bullfights tour and the gold buckle just 8 days after his 18th birthday, and struck gold again in October 2006 claiming his second World Championship!

In late 2004 Wacey was approved for his PRCA bullfighter’s card and in December of 2004 he won the PRCA’s Benny Binion NFR Bucking Stock Sale bullfighting championship. His goal is to someday
work the NFR and PBR finals.

Twice he has been nominated to fight the Kansas High School Rodeo Finals (2004-2005), and was crowned the 2005 and 2006 California Rodeo Salinas freestyle bullfighting champion in Salinas, Calif. In October of 2005 Wacey was shared the crown of Dickies National Champion bullfighter of the PBR with good friend Sam Gress, but was the stand alone champion in 2006 by a narrow margin of three points. In January 2006 Wacey got the opportunity to work the National Western PRCA Rodeo in Denver, Colo.

Wacey is a quality cowboy protector during the bullriding and one that bullriders trust to keep them safe, but he is a world champion freestyle bullfighter so don’t take your eyes off of him after a bullrider leaves the arena, because this is when his fun begins and he will leave you on the edge of your seat with crowd thrilling, heart stopping freestyle bullfighting. Get caught up in the action with Wacey Munsell, the new young gun in town and smoking hot!

Wacey Munsell is attending Dodge City Community College in Dodge City, Kan., with interests in Artificial Insemination, Embryo Transfer and Ag business management.

Bullfighter Makes First P.C. Visit
Jeremy Muntz — here for his first visit to the Ponca City rodeo scene has a passion for the sport of rodeo.

He provides one major function, and that is cowboy protection. It is his job to keep the Bullrider out of harm’s way in the rodeo arena and put his life on the line for a fallen cowboy.

Jeremy is 28 years old and is from Denton, Neb., he has been a PRCA Bullfighter for 2 years.

Jeremy is very familiar with the rodeo industry and has a dedication to the sport and cowboy way of life. He is recognized for his bullfighting ability and cowboy protection in the rodeo arena and professionalism and hard work wherever he may go.

This Doctor Great Rodeo Announcer
Here’s a switch. During the week, he calls the shots in the tense, sterile arena of a hospital operating room.

But on weekends, Dr. Lynn Phillips trades his stethoscope and surgical greens for a silver felt cowboy hat, a silver belt buckle and a silk bandanna and picks up a microphone as a professional rodeo announcer.

During his career as a rodeo announcer, Lynn can truthfully say, “I’ve announced everywhere from Wahoo to Kalamazoo.” A few years ago, he announced a rodeo in the Wings Hockey Stadium in Kalamazoo, Mich., and then he had the pleasure of announcing the PRCA rodeo in Wahoo, Neb. Lynn commented, “Traveling is one of the things I enjoy most about announcing.”

Medicine can’t match his weekend rodeo hobby for excitement, “I still get butterflies before I start announcing,” Phillips smiles, “but unlike years ago, now they fly in formation.”

As long as this announcer is behind the microphone, you will probably never hear the question “Is there a doctor in the house?”

New Activity for 101 Wild West Rodeo is Naming Princess
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation will have a new activity this year, the naming of a 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess.
Introducing.....Charity Rose Pulliam
Born in the heart of 101 Ranch country, nine year old Charity Rose Pulliam hails from Marland,. She is the daughter of Yvonne (Kelly) Tarr and Kevan Pulliam.Charity attends the United Methodist-Christian Church in Marland.

She will be a 4th grader at Frontier Public School. On the Superintendent’s Honor Roll, Charity received the Most Improved and Outstanding Student Award in Reading for the 2008-2009 school year. She is a member of the Frontier Elementary Basketball team and a Frontier mini Cheerleader.

Charity is a new member of the Frontier 4-H and is eagerly awaiting the Noble County Fair when she and her horse “Buddy” can compete in the horse show. In addition to showing “Buddy”, Charity intends to take advantage of all that 4-H has to offer. Her summer activities have included swimming lessons, YMCA T-Ball and Karate lessons. She has attended Northern Oklahoma Flight Academy for the past two years.

Charity was given the honor to sing the National Anthem at the opening ceremonies for the Equestrian Special Olympics in Stillwater. She has collected pledges and ridden in the St. Jude’s Bikea-thon for several years.

Charity has had her hair cut twice in the past three years (12+ inches the first time and 10 inches in January) for the Locks for Love program. It was only natural for Charity to be involved with rodeos as her entire family has always been a part of this great sport. The Evans & Pulliam families were members of the 101 Ranch Memorial Trail riders, an organization that caravanned to surrounding towns to advertise the Rodeo. The Evans family was instrumental in re-organizing the Marland Round-Up Club in 1963. Since 1976 the Kelly families host the annual Dewey Kelly trail ride, the un-official kick off for the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

Charity was the Marland Round-Up Club Sweetheart 2005 & 2006. She was a contestant in the Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Sweetheart Contest 2005, 2006 & 2007 and was High Ticket Salesman in 2005. In 2008, Charity was 1st runner-up in the Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Princess contest. Charity competed in the Cherokee Strip Riding Club and Rodeo Sweetheart contest in 2007 and in the Princess division in 2008 where she received the Tough Cowgirl Award. Charity was a Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Sweetheart for 2006, 2007 and 2008. As a Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Sweetheart, she was invited Royalty at the Miss Old Fort Days Rodeo Pageant in Fort Smith, AR. She received the “Best Dressed” award at their Mardi Gras luncheon.

Compassionate in nature, she especially enjoyed helping with the “Super Kids Rodeo” at the Old Fort Days Rodeo. Charity was given the opportunity to sing “Oklahoma!” at the opening of the Horsemanship portion of the pageant.

She has been a contestant in the 2009 and 2010 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Pageant Princess division.

Charity was nic-named “Miss Social Butterfly” in Pre-School by her Elementary Principle and this name fits her to a T. She is compassionate by nature and is committed to being a great ambassador for the 101 Wild West Rodeo as their new Rodeo Princess.
Introducing.....Trinity Dawn St. Andrews
Trinity Dawn St. Andrews is the nine-year-old daughter of Brian and Lacy St. Andrews. She is from Ponca City, and attends Kildare School and will be going into the fourth grade.

She has two younger sisters Rachel and Payton St. Andrews, which she provides a can, do attitude influence. She’s always there to support and help them in everything they do.

She is an active member of the Newkirk Range Riders club. Where she has participated in the Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo, their play days, trail challenge and their Rodeo Queen Pageant as a sweetheart. She is their 2008 sweetheart horsemanship winner.

Also in 2008 she competed in the Miss Rodeo Oklahoma pageant and is currently a 2009 Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Sweetheart.

This year Trinity joined the COJRA (Central Oklahoma Junior Rodeo Association) where she has made new and wonderful friends. Showing a sportsmanship attitude while competing in barrels, poles, goat tying, and goat undercoating.

Trinity’s goals this year are to get her new horse Callie ready for the 2010 rodeo year, learn to rope, and become a rodeo princess.

Her other enjoyments are swimming and reading, when she’s not practicing or brushing the hair off her horse you will more than likely find her nose stuck in a book. Trinity has always enjoyed horses and learning all aspects of horsemanship. This sport has given her a chance to meet new and interesting people wherever she goes.
Introducing.....Sierra Sidlo
My name is Sierra Sidlo, I’m the 9 year old daughter of Kristy Buck and Edward Sidlo. I have a little brother named Trent, who I enjoy spending some time with. I enjoy spending time with my family and friends.

I got my very own horse for Christmas last year. I enjoy learning new things with my horse Tigger. I ran for the Newkirk Rodeo Sweetheart in 2005 and 2006, and the Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Sweetheart
in 2006. I had a lot of fun running for them and I made a lot of friends. I enjoy riding on trailrides, in showdeos, or just riding for the fun of it. I am a member of the new 4-H club here in Kay County, the Western Wranglers 4-H Club. I am trying to learn as much as possible about my new horse and what we can do together.

I’m looking forward to school starting. I will be in the 4th grade at Union Elementary this year. In school I enjoy reading, math, gym, music, and of course recess.
Introducing.....Madison LeAnn Smith
Madison LeAnn Smith lives North of Ponca City, Oklahoma with parents. Jimmy and Stacie Smith, Sister Rachael and Brother Wyatt. Madison is 11 years old and a Newkirk Middle School Student.

Madison holds the office of Vice-President of the Western Wranglers 4-H Horse Project Club. In 2008 She won the High-point Hunter judged buckle at the NW District 4-H Horse Show. In 2004 Madison won her first Rodeo Sweetheart pageant and took that title to the 2005 Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Scholarship Pageant where she and seven other girls were named Miss Oklahoma Rodeo Sweethearts. She won the title of Miss Newkirk Range Riders Rodeo Princess as well as the Horsemanship award and speech category in 2008.

When she is not riding her horse OSU Triple My Check at horse shows, rodeo’s or helping her dad gathering cattle on the ranch; Madison enjoys hunting, fishing, cooking, and arts and crafts.

Madison’s future goals include being named Valedictorian other Senior class and graduating Veterinary Medicine School at OSU before opening a successful Veterinary Clinic.

National Anthem Singers
Special singers will perform the National Anthem at the 101 Wild West Rodeo during its 50th Anniversary.
On Thursday Night, it will be Shelby Carpenter.
Shelby is the 16 year old daughter, of Sonny and Robin Carpenter.


As a junior at Newkirk High School she enjoys the sport of rodeo, choir, basketball and FFA.


Competing in rodeos at a very early age has been very rewarding to her with the winnings of many buckles and saddles by competing in the barrel racing, pole bending, goat tying and break-away calf roping. Also, this year she has added team roping to list of events and enjoys partnering up with her dad, Sonny and states rodeo is a great way to spend time with family and friends.


To go along with rodeos, Shelby has competed in all levels of choir and received many awards. Her most recent award was excellent ratings received her sophomore year at State and District Competitions for singing her first foreign language song. This song was a great experience and is looking forward to expanding her singing abilities.


She wishes all contestants of 101 Wild West Rodeo the best of luck in their events and thanks all the spectators for coming out to support the Greatest Sport on Dirt!

Then, on Friday night, it will be Lenin Thomas.
Lerin Thomas is the 14 year old daughter of Jim Thomas and Sharla Thomas of Newkirk. She will be a freshman at Newkirk High School where she is active in 4-H and FFA and plays basketball and softball.

She enjoys spending time with her family and friends, jugging at the lake, hunting, going to rodeos, singing and texting. Lerin says she loves singing the National Anthem at events because she feels it is her way of supporting her country and our troops.
The third night of the rodeo on Saturday, fans will hear Chelsea Gann.
Chelsea is from Liberty Mounds, Okla. She is 20 years old and has been singing all her life.

She has sung the National Anthem at the IFR for the last 3 years.

She also sings for the Tulsa 66’ers basketball team, the Tulsa Drillers, Tulsa University, NSU, and many other High School sporting events. She is the daughter of Duane and Debbie Gann both of Liberty.

She works at Sky Fitness in Tulsa and enjoys singing and hanging out with friends and family.

Annual 101 Rodeo Kicks Off Thursday
By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Rodeo fans will get an opportunity Thursday to see not only the regular performance of the opening night of the 50th anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, but to view extra competition if they wish.

That’s because of the past several years, the 101 Rodeo Foundation has requested stock contractors bring enough extra stock for timed events. As a result there’s a term called “slack” that puts competitors into the arena for additional competition.

And there’s also a competition of steer roping, which is not provided on the regular three or four nights of competition, depending on the number of nights the foundation wants to run the rodeo. A few years ago, there were four-night rodeo performances, providing fans with an opportunity to see some competitors twice in various events.

Steer roping will be held Thursday morning starting at 8 a.m. at the 101 Ranch Rodeo arena located on North Ash Street at West Prospect Avenue. The Andrews Stock Company from Texas will be bringing enough stock for this year’s rodeo also, to have an addition amount of “slack” when the first night of the rodeo on Thursday is completed. After that first night, there will be some “slack” in tie-down roping, steer wrestling and team roping, in addition to some extra runs in the girls barrel racing. So, Thursday will be a big day at the arena, with a total of 49 steer ropers set for two “go-rounds” starting at 8 a.m.

Then, at 8 p.m. Thursday, the gates will open for the official Grand Entry featuring the 101 Wild West Rodeo Women’s Drill Team along with competitors and others who enjoy taking their turns around the arena.

Included, but not necessarily on horseback, will be the 101 Rodeo Foundation board of directors, including Larry Goodno, Chairman; Gary Parli, Vice Chairman; Darleanna Warnecke, Secretary and Shawndra Sheik, Treasurer. Then there’s others with important committee responsibility, including Brad Beaty/Steve Peresko, Sponsorship; Raymond Ball/Darrel Dye, Promotions; Robin Carpenter/Hank Hainsinger, Events; Shannon Chambers/George Pease, Concessions; Tyson Morton/Scott Burries, Grounds; Dr. Tim Blanton/Steve Powell, Contract Personal.

The board also has some important members from years ago, including Honorary Lifetime Members, Bethel Freeman, John Heinze, Harold Horton and Lois Scott.

Expected also in the grand entry, are the seven queen candidates for the 101 Wild West Rodeo, and the four candidates for the new royalty, a 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo parade will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday along Grand Avenue, and the Kid’s Rodeo, following immediately in the area of the Ponca City Library.

50th Anniversary Celebration Held
Annual 101 Rodeo Activities Begin in Ponca City

 
     
 

Lightning Puts a Halt to Steer Roping During ‘Slack’ Running
By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Lightning put a stop at 9:30 a.m. of the second “go-round” of steer roping during this morning’s “slack” running of the 101 Wild West Rodeo.

The competition picked back up after a slight delay and finished around 10:45.

The Sammy Andrews Stock Company worked through the first “go-round” in cloudy, then sprinkles and then a good shower. At the time of drawing steers for the second “go-round” the arena was beginning to get a bit slick from the rain, but it wasn’t until nine of the ropers had tried their efforts in that second “go” when officials put a stop to the rest of the action.

Unless the weather really turns much worse, tonight’s opening performance of the 50h anniversary of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, is set to begin at 8 p.m. It is “Are You Tough Enough to Wear Pink?” night, so put on those pink shirts and blouses and provide the 101 Rodeo Foundation enough reason to donate big to cancer research. Prior to the lightning, the first “go-round” went rather smooth.

It was cloudy, but in the west, one could very well sense that some tough weather could prevail during the morning “slack” period.

And while the first three ropers had a tough time fitting the lasso around the steer, Jason Stockton of Alderson, did it in 16.7 while two others had no time. And then Jim Falk of South Coffeyville got
a 12.7.

But that went by the boards pretty quick, when J.B. Whatley of Gardendale, Texas, had an 11.3 and then it was topped by a full second at 10.3 by J. Tom Fisher of Andrews, Texas. That 10.3 stood up for first in the first “go-round” for $934. Similar payoffs will come in the second “goround” and the “best average” which is total time on two steers.

C.A. Lauer of Buffalo had an 11.1 which eventually got him $773 and then Scott Snedecor of Uvalde, Texas, had another 11.3 for $531.64, tying Whatley, who also got $531.64.

The first “go-round” finished at 8:58 a.m. and following the drawing of steers for the second “go-round” action began at 9:17 a.m. But it wasn’t but 10 minutes or so for the officials to end the efforts as a result of strong lightning. However, prior to calling a halt at that time, Rocky Patterson of Pratt, Kan., got a steer in 10.6 to go with his first “go-round” of 11.9 that made a 22.5 on two. That should force other steer ropers to really try their best once activity resumed.

Tonight’s performance will include all the usual activity, provided the weather cooperates.

The 101 Wild West Rodeo parade will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday along Grand Avenue, and the Kid’s Rodeo, following immediately in the area of the Ponca City Library.
 

Nice Crowd on Hand For First Rodeo Night
By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

A rather good “Are You Tough Enough to Wear Pink?” night crowd showed appreciation Thursday night as the opening night of the three night 101 Wild West Rodeo got under way. The rodeo is in its 50th Anniversary year.

Despite a mid-morning rain and lightning that eventually held up action during “slack” of steer ropers at the 101 Ranch Arena Thursday, rodeo officials were able to get the arena in good shape for the performance. There were some areas along the west fence line that drew attention and a few other slick spots, but it did not keep the Sammy Andrews Stock Company from presenting quite a show.

There were some anxious moments (some fans got a good laugh at others, who were splattered with mud and water during part of the early events).

Best ride in the bareback went to Justin Anderson of Sperry with a 74 on Firelane while Jacob Kendrick Duncan of Malakoff, Texas, had 70 on Jamboree. There were some local ranch hands trying their best to stay on in an event sponsored by 7-Clans Paradise and First Council Casinos. Best was Lee Chambers with a 77 and then E.J. Gagon had a 70.

Regular night performance fans got a treat then in the steer wrestling, when Skyler Strassman of Warner, turned the steer in 4.4. It held up even through “slack” which followed the regular night’s performance Thursday. However, Eldon Day of Morris had a 4.8 in “slack” and that put him second while Stockton Graves of Newkirk had 5.4 in front of the crowd that got tied later in “slack” by Justin Rumford, now of Ponca City.

Spud Duvall of Checotah had 5.7 and then in “slack” Dru Melvin of Tryon, Neb., had 5.9. Tops in the tie-down roping in the early part of the program was by Ponca City’s Jerome Schneeberger, as he showed off his National Finals Rodeo style with a 9.5. But it wasn’t able to withstand the 8.9 effort produced by Blair Barr of Durant during “slack” that put him in first place. Whether any of the efforts will keep their spots will be decided later tonight and Saturday, as the rodeo continues its three-day run, starting each night at 8 p.m. Saddle bronc riding gave the crowd something to cheer about, when Bradley Harter of Weatherford, Texas, had a 76 on Baccarat to nip Justin Arnold of Santa Margarita, Calif., who had 75 on Jam Bone. Third presently is Casey Sisk of Corona, N.M., with a 74 on Tango.

Team ropers in front of the large crowd showed some top efforts, when Luke Brown of Rock Hill, S.C.., and Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, had a 6.0 and Ty Blasingame, Olney Springs, Colo., and J.W. Borrego, Pueblo West, Colo., had 6.2. But they actually came up third and fourth after “slack” performers took over the top two spots. Those went to Chad Lehew of Marlow and Jay Morgan of Duncan with a 5.3 and then Jake Weddle of St. Joe, Ark., and Shawn Harris of Searcy, Ark., had 5.9. Fans were treated also to two sections of bull riding, with a total of 16 scheduled on Thursday. Fans tonight and Saturday will see a similar program with 15 scheduled. However, the Andrews Stock Company is famous for having some of the toughest bulls in the nation, and have had several at the National Finals Rodeo. None of the first five to attempt it were successful in staying on the bull, but later in the program, fans were thrilled to the 76 score of Souli Shanklin of Rocksprings, Texas, who stayed on 604. Six others were not able to do that (stay on), and a total of four were not at the event. In local team roping, sponsored by Osage Million Dollar Elm Casino, best effort was that of Brad Dickson and Chris Smith with 7.6, the first two to take on the challenge. Others with good times included L.J. Case and Tanner Case with a 14.4 and Jarrod Smith and Earl Smith with 14.6. There will be more efforts Friday and then several after the regular performance in “slack” with attempts to become one of the eight teams vying for the coveted saddles presented by the sponsors on Saturday.

Diane Martin of Ulysses, Kan., had a 17.81 during the regular performance in girls barrel racing and that stood up throughout the night, since no other racer was able to get under 18-seconds. Rachelle Holt of Gruver, Texas had 18.53, but that is third, after the “slack” competitors took over shortly after 10:30 p.m. Thursday. Shari Amiotte of Fort Pierre, S.D., had 18.36 for second while June Holeman of Arcadia, Neb., had 18.66 for fourth and Natalie Overholt of Burr Oak, Mich., had 18.67. fifth.

Melissa Navarre, secretary of the Andrews Stock Company, reported that “slack” competition in the steer roping event on Thursday had been completed and that results posted included besides the first “go-round” that had earlier been noted. Finishing fifth in the first go was Mike Chase of McAlester, with 11.5 for $289.99 and sixth Rocky Patterson of Pratt with 11.9 for $161.10.

Patterson won the second go for $934.40 with a 10.6 and the average with a 22.5 for another $934.40.

In the second go, Cody Lee of Gatesville, Texas, had 1.0 for $773.30 and a tie for third and fourth found at 11.4 by Shane Suggs, Granbury, Texas and Cody Garnett of McAlester got them $531.64 each. Fifth went to Chance Kelton of Mayer, Ariz., with 11.6 for $289.99 and sixth was Kim Ziegelgruber of Edmond, with 11.8 for $161.10. Besides Patterson, other aggregate results were J.B. Whatley, Gardendale, Texas, with 25.7 on two for $773.30; Will Gasperson, Decatur, Texas, with 25.8 on two for $612.20 and Ziegelgruber, 26.1 on two for $451.09. Fifth went to Pawhuska’s Chet Herren with 27.3 on two for $289.99 and Chance Kelton of Mayer, Ariz., 28.4 on two for $161.10.

The rodeo continues with two performances Friday and Saturday, both starting at 8 p.m., and then at 10 a.m. Saturday, the 101 Wild West Rodeo parade will be held along Grand Avenue. A Kid’s Rodeo will be on tap shortly after the parade, in the area along the 600 block of East Grand Avenue, at the Ponca City Library.

Revealing who will be the 101 Wild West Rodeo queen from seven contestants will be held at the Saturday performance.

 
     
 

Thanks
The 101 Wild West Rodeo Foundation expresses a sincere “thanks” to the following individuals, firms, and organizations who have contributed to the success of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess Pageant.

Princess’s Saddle…..Trout Funeral Home.
Princess’s Head Stall & Breast Collar…..URIBE Saddlery.
Princess’s Buckle…..Trout Funeral Home.
Princess’s Crown…..Calie Jo’s.
Princess’s Sash: …..Leather, etc., Joyce Crouch.
First Runner-up: $100 Concho pendant…..Morton Brothers.
Horsemanship Winner: Blanket…..Morton Brothers.
Ticket Sales Winner: Tote Bag…..Leather, etc.,Joyce Crouch.
Contestant’s Flowers…..Bella Flora and Gifts.
Horsemanship Sponsor…..Play Pen Arena, Tim & Kathy Gilbert.
Pageant Director…..Connie Morton.

Perfect Conditions for 101 Rodeo Rodeo Celebration Continues
By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Weather and obviously super efforts by the 101 Rodeo Foundation took Thursday’s muddy arena and turned it into perfect conditions for Friday night’s 101 Wild West Rodeo. Contestants and anybody entering the arena had to be quite pleased with the way things were for the second night of the 50th anniversary of the rodeo.

That said, there’s no better way to explain it than to provide the results that came about Friday, and will have been tough to beat out during Saturday’s performance.

Then, too, rodeo fans will have had a big day in Ponca City with a 10 a.m. parade and Kid’s Rodeo, plus during Saturday’s performance, the coronation of the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen for 2009 will be held. Seven contestants have been participating throughout the week in activities leading up to the coronation, including Kelly Bergin, Cheyenne Bergman, Kelbi Ann Campbell, Rebecca Jo Nester, Malory Lynn Scott, Destiny Shelton and Tara Wilde.

Team ropers Chad Lehew of Marlow and Jay Morgan of Duncan on Thursday during slack posted a 5.3, and it stood up despite some really good efforts on Friday.

Other performers in the Friday rodeo that were not able to better Thursday efforts were local team ropers in the regular schedule. However, shortly after the show came to a close, a total of 20 team roping teams awaited for numbers to be drawn on steers and a total of eight teams were able to post times. That was unlike the “no time” posted on the board for the eight teams in the regular performance.

The team of Steve Griffith and Joey Denny posted a 7.1 and that bested the 7.6 of Thursday’s top time from Brad Dickson and Chris Smith. Other note-worthy efforts, under 10 seconds at least, were turned in by Justin Howell-Cody Lane at 8.1 and Lonnie Ware-Ted McKee at 8.3. Plus Troy Christianson-Jeff Franks with an 8.6 and Matt Garrett and Paul Lee Forman had 9.2.Former national champion Billy Etbauer, now of Edmond, put a 76 on the scoreboard during his ride in the saddle bronc competition as he rode Andrews Stock Company’s Snort to the limit. That tied him with Thursday’s best effort on the saddle broncs by Bradley Harter of Weatherford, Texas, on Baccarat.

All other professional events got new leaders from Friday’s performance. And it all started in the bareback event, first up for rodeo fans following the Grand Entry. Justin McDaniel of Porum had an 84 on Phantom, and that topped an earlier night’s effort of 79 by D.V. Fennell of Neosho, Mo., on Shady Lady. Also, Bee Jay Scott of Otley, Iowa, had 75 on Jitterbug. The best on Thursday had been a 74 by Justin Anderson of Sperry on Firelane.

Steer wrestlers really found good footing, with Kyle Hughes of Olney Springs, Colo., posting a 4.6. That went along with Steven Teague, Wichita Falls, Texas and Mark Scales of Pittsburg, Kan., each with a 4.8. Best on Thursday came in slack when Eldon Day of Morris had 4.8 while Stockton Graves of Newkirk and Justin Rumford of Ponca City had wowed the home crowd with 5.4 during the regular Thursday performance.

Jarrett of Summerville, Ga., had 8.8 and that put him in the lead, just ahead of a slack performer Thursday, Blair Burk of Durant, who had 8.9 Jerome Schneeberger of Ponca City also wowed the home crowd during the regular performance Thursday with a 9.5, but it stands third heading into the Saturday efforts.

Team ropers also showed better times in the improved arena, when Adam Rose of Willard, Mo., and Jake Long of Coffeyville, Kan., had a 5.4, which was a tenth of a second behind that posted during Thursday slack by Lehew-Morgan. Third into Saturday’s effort came also on Friday with Mitch Murray of Alma, Kan., and Darin Suit of Ames with a 5.8.

The real show came Friday in girls barrel racing when three were under the 17.81 posted during the regular Thursday performance by Diane Martin of Ulysses, Kan. The three included leader Hollie Etbauer of Edmond with 17.42 and then Kasey Etbauer of Goodwell with 17.62 followed by Tara Timms of Leedy with 17.75. Kim Squires of Carnegie had 17.82.

There are two sections of bull riding for rodeo fans to enjoy. In the first section Friday, Beau Schroeder of China, Texas, had an 85 on Wacky Weed. Thursday, Souli Shanklin of Rocksprings, Texas, had 76. Only one other bull rider was successful through the eight-second regulation, with Luke Haught of Weatherford, Texas, getting a 71 on Avatar.

 
 
 

Annual 101 Rodeo Comes to an End
By BOB PATTERSON
News City Editor

Most of the regular events of rodeo escaped pressure packed action at Saturday’s third night running of the 101 Wild West Rodeo, the 50th Anniversary of the rodeo.

However, there were some exciting times and scores during the early stages at least, and then near the end of the rodeo as well. So fans who wanted to see some real great efforts got their wishes for the most part, despite seeing that none of the bull riders could match the efforts of the Sammy Andrews Rodeo Company’s bulls.

Prior to the contestants entering the arena, the 101 Rodeo Foundation held its first coronation of a 101 Wild West Rodeo Princess. The title went to Madison LeAnn Smith, the daughter of Jimmy and Stacie Smith from Ponca City. Then shortly after the opening contestant event of the rodeo the 101 Wild West Rodeo Queen was crowned. She is Kelly Bergin, a 17-year-old, daughter of Chris Bergin
and Melinda Barr of Oklahoma City.

Following the Grand Entry, narrated so successfully again by the popular Dr. Lynn Phillips of Enid, and featuring the 101 Wild West Rodeo Women’s Drill Team, the third night of rodeo got under way.

And fans had to be on time this third night, as two of the top scores in the bareback riding event put on quite a show. Best was that of Jared Keylon, Fort Scott, Kan., who rode the Andrews Rodeo Company’s Power Play for an 89 score to eventually win the event hands down. That got him $1,097.25. He had company in the winnings on Saturday night in bareback riding, when Justin Williams, another Kansan from DeSoto, rode Roly Poly for a 77 marking to finish in fourth money that got him $399.

Tops in the bareback had been a ride by Justin McDaniel of Porum on Phantom for a score of 84. That got him second money of $831.25.

Saturday’s local ranch bronc riding contestant, sponsored by 7 Clans Paradise and First Council Casinos, saw Drew Lockwood get a 66. He was the only successful rider during the night in the four that participated.

And then, following the queen coronation, the fans got a great showing of steer wrestling. The guys, who Dr. Phillips claims “like to get down and dirty on the arena floor,” provided some good times, but it wasn’t until Ricky D. Riley of Checotah “the steer wrestling capital of Oklahoma,” got a 4.2. Wow, that was best of the entire rodeo, and a winning effort of $1,770.09 for Riley. It was a good four-tenths of a second better than what had been posted throughout the other two nights of action.

And, two others on Saturday got into the money. They were Cole Edge of Durant and Casey Martin of Sulphur, La., who shared sixth place with their time of 4.9 and $152.69 each. Best prior to the 4.2 of Riley was a 4.6 by Kyle Hughes, Olney Springs, Colo., which got him second money of $1,464.90. That’s not bad for less than five seconds work!

That brought the rodeo to its next stage, tie-down roping. Ryan Jarrett of Summerville, Ga., had set the stage with an 8.8 earlier in the three-night performance, and it withstood all comers Saturday. Jarrett finished on top for $1,811.41.

However, Rick Greiner of Highmore, S.D., had a 9.5 Saturday night and that pulled him into a third-fourth place tie with Ponca City’s Jerome Schneeberger, and the two received $1,030.63 each for
their efforts.

Andrews Rodeo Company secretary Melissa Navarre and her assistant as timer Jodi Peterson noted a slight error in the scoring effort during earlier riding scores of saddle bronc. Billy Etbauer of Edmond had been reported as having a 76, but it was indeed a 75, which dropped him into a third place tie with Matt McCoy of Stephenville, Texas, each getting $555.75. Best for the saddle bronc riders were a pair of 76s turned in by Justin Arnold of Santa Margarita, Calif., and Bradley Harter of Weatherford, Texas, each getting $1,074.45.

Best on Saturday was a 74 by Brad Pierce, of Baird, Texas, on Jet Ski and that got him into a three-way tie for fifth and sixth money, with the trio getting $148.20 apiece.

Team ropers on Saturday were faced with having to best a 5.3 posted by the header heeler team of Chad Lehew, Marlow and Jay Morgan, Duncan, respectively, who ended up in first place for $1,315.51 each. Fans did witness some good efforts on Saturday, but what could have won for a pair of the teams, at 4.8 and 5.3 turned out to be too quick out of the chute by the header in each case, and they wound up down the list with each getting 10-second penalty tacked onto their times.

Shane McLemore of Anadarko and Darrel L. Radacy of Lookeba did have a 6.2 that got them into the money, sharing the sixth place with Ty Blasingame of Olney Springs, Colo., and J.W. Borrego, Pueblo West, Colo., at $113.41 each.

Providing a thrilling time as the first racer in the girls barrel racing Saturday was something that rodeo fans were happy to see, when Tana Poppino of Big Cabin turned the clover-leaf pattern into a 17.32 effort. That got her top prize money in the event of $1,171.06 and a full tenth of a second better than second, that went to Hollie Etbauer of Edmond, who had a 17.42 for $1,003.77.

Other Saturday racers getting into the money included Amy Prather of Goddard, Kan., with an 18.01 for ninth at $167.29 and Rachael Reichenberg of Hershey, Neb., with an 18.15 for tenth at $111.53.

So, with none of the bull riders on Saturday able to finish the eight-seconds required on the back of the bulls, top prize money went to an 85 score turned in earlier in the three-night running by Beau Schroeder of China, Texas, on Wacky Weed. That got him $2,683.82.

The Osage Million Dollar Elm Casino saddles for the best team effort in the local team roping went to Brad Dickson and Chris Smith, as they posted a 6.7 to go with an earlier 7.6 for 14.3 on two. Second went to the team of Shane Jones and Doug Belair, who had a 7.3 Saturday to go with a 12.5 for 19.8 and third was the best run of the night by Jarrod Smith and Earl Smith with a 6.6. But their 14.6 was a bit too slow as they finished with 21.2 on two head.

101 Wild West Rodeo Money Winners
(Andrews Rodeo Company, Secretary Melissa Navarre)

Bareback Riding
1. Jared Keylon, Fort Scott, Kan., 89, $1097.25.
2. Justin McDaniel, Porum, 84, $831.25.
3. D.V. Fennell, Neosho, Mo., 79, $598.50.
4. Justin Williams, DeSoto, Kan., 78, $399.00.
5. Bee Jay Scott, Otley, Iowa, 75, $232.75.
6. Justin Anderson, Sperry, 74, $166.25.

Saddle Bronc Riding
1-2. Justin Arnold, Santa Margarita, Calif., 76, $1,074.45.
1-2. Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas, 76, $1,074.45.
3-4. Billy Etbauer, Edmond, 75, $555.76.
3-4. Matt McCoy, Stephenville, Texas, 75, $555.76.
5-6. Casey Sisk, Corona, N.M., 74, $148.20.
5-6. Travis Sheets, Hyannis, Neb., 74, $148.20.
5-6. Brad Pierce, Baird, Texas, 74, $148.20.

Bull Riding
1. Beau Schroeder, China, Texas, 85, $1,683.82.
2. Souli Shanklin, Rocksprings, Texas, 76, $1,275.62.
3. Luke Haught, Weatherford, Texas, 71, $918.45.

Steer Wrestling
1. Ricky D. Riley, Checotah, 4.2, $1,770.09.
2. Kyle Hughes, Olney Springs, Colo., 4.6, $1,464.90.
3-4-5. Steven Teague, Wichita Falls, Texas, 4.8, $854.52.
3-4-5. Mark Scales, Pittsburg, Kan., 4.8, $854.52.
3-4-5. Eldon Day, Morris, 4.8, $854.52.
6-tie. Cole Edge, Durant, 4.9, $152.59.
6-tie. Casey Martin, Sulphur, La., 4.9, $152.59.

Tie-Down Roping
1. Ryan Jarrett, Summerville, Ga., 8.8, $1,811.41.
2. Blair Burk, Durant, 8.9, $1,499.10.
3-4. Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, 9.5, $1,030.63.
3-4. Rick Greiner, Highmore, S.D., 9.5, $1,030.63.
5. Heath Humble, Cherokee, Kan., 10.2, $562.16.
6. Kurt A. Goulding, Comanche, 10.9, $312.31.

Team Roping
1. Chad Lehew, Marlow and Jay Morgan, Duncan, 5.3, $1,315.51 each.
2. Adam Rose, Willard, Mo., and Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan., 5.4, $1,088.70 each.
3. Mitch Murray, Alma, Kan., and Darin Suit, Ames, 5.8, $861.89 each.
4. Jake Weddle, St. Joe, Ark., and Shawn Harris, Searcy, Ark., 5.9, $635.08 each.
5. Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C., and Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, 6.0, $408.26 each.
6-tie. Ty Blasingame, Olney Springs, Colo., and J.W. Borrego, Pueblo West, Colo., 6.2, $113.41 each.
6-tie. Shane McLemore, Anadarko, and Darrel L. Radacy, Lookeba, 6.2, $113.41 each.

Barrel Racing
1. Tana Poppino, Big Cabin, 17.32, $1,171.06.
2. Hollie Etbauer, Edmond, 17.42, $1,003.77.
3. Kasey Etbauer, Goodwell, 17.62, $836.47.
4. Mary Burger, Pauls Valley, 17.65, $724.94.
5. Mattie Little, Ardmore, 17.66, $557.65.
6. Tara Timms, Leedey, 17.75, $446.12.
7. Diane Martin, Ulysses, Kan., 17.81, $334.59.
8. Kim Squires, Carnegie, 17.82, $223.06.
9. Amy Prather, Goodard, Kan., 18.01, $167.29.
10. Rachel Reichenberg, Hershey, Neb., 18.15, $111.53.

 
 
 
 
 

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Disclaimer - The information found on these pages is only meant to be a concise chronological collection of happenings as they relate to each year's 101 Ranch Rodeo and not a complete or total recreation of each year's events and/or happenings. If you have additional information pertaining to the 101 Ranch Rodeo and would like to share it with us and others that visit this website, please feel free to submit your information to us and we will be glad to review it and consider adding it to these pages.

 

   
 
 
   
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